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Mark 6:51-52

Context
6:51 Then he went up with them into the boat, and the wind ceased. They were completely astonished, 6:52 because they did not understand about the loaves, but their hearts were hardened.

Mark 7:17-19

Context

7:17 Now 1  when Jesus 2  had left the crowd and entered the house, his disciples asked him about the parable. 7:18 He said to them, “Are you so foolish? Don’t you understand that whatever goes into a person from outside cannot defile him? 7:19 For it does not enter his heart but his stomach, and then goes out into the sewer.” 3  (This means all foods are clean.) 4 

Mark 8:1-10

Context
The Feeding of the Four Thousand

8:1 In those days there was another large crowd with nothing to eat. So 5  Jesus 6  called his disciples and said to them, 8:2 “I have compassion on the crowd, because they have already been here with me three days, and they have nothing to eat. 8:3 If I send them home hungry, they will faint on the way, and some of them have come from a great distance.” 8:4 His disciples answered him, “Where can someone get enough bread in this desolate place to satisfy these people?” 8:5 He asked them, “How many loaves do you have?” They replied, “Seven.” 8:6 Then 7  he directed the crowd to sit down on the ground. After he took the seven loaves and gave thanks, he broke them and began giving them to the disciples to serve. So 8  they served the crowd. 8:7 They also had a few small fish. After giving thanks for these, he told them to serve these as well. 8:8 Everyone 9  ate and was satisfied, and they picked up the broken pieces left over, seven baskets full. 8:9 There were about four thousand 10  who ate. 11  Then he dismissed them. 12  8:10 Immediately he got into a boat with his disciples and went to the district of Dalmanutha. 13 

Mark 8:14-21

Context
The Yeast of the Pharisees and Herod

8:14 Now 14  they had forgotten to take bread, except for one loaf they had with them in the boat. 8:15 And Jesus 15  ordered them, 16  “Watch out! Beware of the yeast of the Pharisees 17  and the yeast of Herod!” 8:16 So they began to discuss with one another about having no bread. 18  8:17 When he learned of this, 19  Jesus said to them, “Why are you arguing 20  about having no bread? Do you still not see or understand? Have your hearts been hardened? 8:18 Though you have eyes, don’t you see? And though you have ears, can’t you hear? 21  Don’t you remember? 8:19 When I broke the five loaves for the five thousand, how many baskets full of pieces did you pick up?” They replied, “Twelve.” 8:20 “When I broke the seven loaves for the four thousand, how many baskets full of pieces did you pick up?” They replied, 22  “Seven.” 8:21 Then 23  he said to them, “Do you still not understand?” 24 

Mark 8:27-30

Context
Peter’s Confession

8:27 Then Jesus and his disciples went to the villages of Caesarea Philippi. 25  On the way he asked his disciples, 26  “Who do people say that I am?” 8:28 They said, 27  “John the Baptist, others say Elijah, 28  and still others, one of the prophets.” 8:29 He asked them, “But who do you say that I am?” Peter answered him, 29  “You are the Christ.” 30  8:30 Then 31  he warned them not to tell anyone about him. 32 

Mark 8:33

Context
8:33 But after turning and looking at his disciples, he rebuked Peter and said, “Get behind me, Satan. You are not setting your mind on God’s interests, but on man’s.” 33 

Mark 9:5

Context
9:5 So 34  Peter said to Jesus, 35  “Rabbi, it is good for us to be here. Let us make three shelters 36  – one for you, one for Moses, and one for Elijah.”

Mark 9:10

Context
9:10 They kept this statement to themselves, discussing what this rising from the dead meant.

Mark 9:33

Context
Questions About the Greatest

9:33 Then 37  they came to Capernaum. 38  After Jesus 39  was inside the house he asked them, “What were you discussing on the way?”

Mark 10:28

Context

10:28 Peter began to speak to him, “Look, 40  we have left everything to follow you!” 41 

Mark 10:35-45

Context
The Request of James and John

10:35 Then 42  James and John, the sons of Zebedee, came to him and said, “Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask.” 10:36 He said to them, “What do you want me to do for you?” 10:37 They said to him, “Permit one of us to sit at your right hand and the other at your left in your glory.” 10:38 But Jesus said to them, “You don’t know what you are asking! Are you able to drink the cup I drink or be baptized with the baptism I experience?” 43  10:39 They said to him, “We are able.” 44  Then Jesus said to them, “You will drink the cup I drink, and you will be baptized with the baptism I experience, 10:40 but to sit at my right or at my left is not mine to give. It is for those for whom it has been prepared.” 45 

10:41 Now 46  when the other ten 47  heard this, 48  they became angry with James and John. 10:42 Jesus called them and said to them, “You know that those who are recognized as rulers of the Gentiles lord it over them, and those in high positions use their authority over them. 10:43 But it is not this way among you. Instead whoever wants to be great among you must be your servant, 10:44 and whoever wants to be first among you must be the slave 49  of all. 10:45 For even the Son of Man did not come to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom 50  for many.”

Mark 14:19

Context
14:19 They were distressed, and one by one said to him, “Surely not I?”

Mark 14:29-37

Context
14:29 Peter said to him, “Even if they all fall away, I will not!” 14:30 Jesus said to him, “I tell you the truth, 51  today – this very night – before a rooster crows twice, you will deny me three times.” 14:31 But Peter 52  insisted emphatically, 53  “Even if I must die with you, I will never deny you.” And all of them said the same thing.

Gethsemane

14:32 Then 54  they went to a place called Gethsemane, and Jesus 55  said to his disciples, “Sit here while I pray.” 14:33 He took Peter, James, 56  and John with him, and became very troubled and distressed. 14:34 He said to them, “My soul is deeply grieved, even to the point of death. Remain here and stay alert.” 14:35 Going a little farther, he threw himself to the ground and prayed that if it were possible the hour would pass from him. 14:36 He said, “Abba, 57  Father, all things are possible for you. Take this cup 58  away from me. Yet not what I will, but what you will.” 14:37 Then 59  he came and found them sleeping, and said to Peter, “Simon, are you sleeping? Couldn’t you stay awake for one hour?

Mark 14:50

Context
14:50 Then 60  all the disciples 61  left him and fled.

Mark 14:66-72

Context
Peter’s Denials

14:66 Now 62  while Peter was below in the courtyard, one of the high priest’s slave girls 63  came by. 14:67 When she saw Peter warming himself, she looked directly at him and said, “You also were with that Nazarene, Jesus.” 14:68 But he denied it: 64  “I don’t even understand what you’re talking about!” 65  Then 66  he went out to the gateway, and a rooster crowed. 67  14:69 When the slave girl saw him, she began again to say to the bystanders, “This man is one of them.” 14:70 But he denied it again. A short time later the bystanders again said to Peter, “You must be 68  one of them, because you are also a Galilean.” 14:71 Then he began to curse, and he swore with an oath, “I do not know this man you are talking about!” 14:72 Immediately a rooster 69  crowed a second time. Then 70  Peter remembered what Jesus had said to him: “Before a rooster crows twice, you will deny me three times.” And he broke down and wept. 71 

1 tn Grk “And.” Here καί (kai) has been translated as “now” to indicate the transition to a new topic.

2 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

3 tn Or “into the latrine.”

4 sn This is a parenthetical note by the author.

5 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “so” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

6 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

7 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

8 tn Grk “And.” Here καί (kai) has been translated as “so” to indicate the implied result of previous action(s) in the narrative.

9 tn Grk “They.”

10 sn The parallel in Matt 15:32-39 notes that the four thousand were only men, a point not made explicit in Mark.

11 tn The words “who ate” are not in the Greek text but have been supplied for clarity.

12 sn Mark 8:1-10. Many commentators, on the basis of similarities between this account of the feeding of the multitude (8:1-10) and that in 6:30-44, have argued that there is only one event referred to in both passages. While there are similarities in language and in the response of the disciples, there are also noticeable differences, including the different number present on each occasion (i.e., 5,000 in chap. 6 and 4,000 here). In the final analysis, the fact that Jesus refers to two distinct feedings in 8:18-20 settles the issue; this passage represents another very similar incident to that recorded in 6:30-44.

13 sn The exact location of Dalmanutha is uncertain, but it is somewhere close to the western shore of the Sea of Galilee.

14 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “now” to indicate the transition to a new topic.

15 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

16 tn Grk “was giving them orders, saying.” The participle λέγων (legwn) is redundant in English and has not been translated.

17 sn See the note on Pharisees in 2:16.

18 tn Grk “And they were discussing with one another that they had no bread.”

19 tn Or “becoming aware of it.”

20 tn Or “discussing.”

21 tn Grk “do you not hear?”

22 tc ‡ A difficult textual problem is found here, involving three different variants: καὶ λέγουσιν (kai legousin) is found in א pc; οἱ δὲ εἶπον (Joi de eipon) is the reading of Ì45 A D W Θ Ë1,13 33 Ï it; and καὶ λέγουσιν αὐτῷ (kai legousin autw) is supported by B C L (Δ 579 892) 2427 pc. The first two variants would not be translated differently; the third reading, however, would add “to him” after “they replied.” What complicates the issue is that the external evidence is fairly evenly split between the second and third readings, though the first reading is in agreement with the second reading in lacking the dative pronoun. Indeed, another layout of the problem here could treat this as two distinct problems: καὶ λέγουσιν vs. οἱ δὲ εἶπον and αὐτῷ vs. omission of the word. In this second arrangement of the problem, the reading without the pronoun has slightly stronger support (Ì45 א A D W Θ Ë1,13 33 Ï it). Internally, Mark never elsewhere uses the form εἶπον for the third person plural indicative form of this verb (it is always εἶπαν [eipan]). And although only one other time in Mark is the object lacking after λέγουσιν (6:38), it is a similar context (viz., the disciples’ response before Jesus feeds the 5000). Very tentatively, the reading that is followed here is καὶ λέγουσιν. NA27 puts αὐτῷ in brackets, indicating some doubt as to its authenticity.

23 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “Then” to indicate the implied sequence in the narrative.

24 sn Do you still not understand? The disciples in Mark’s Gospel often misunderstood the miracles of Jesus as well as his teaching. Between Matthew, Mark, and Luke, Mark paints the most revealing portrait of the shortcomings of the Twelve (cf. 6:51-52; 7:17-19; 8:1-10, 14-21, 27-30, 33; 9:5, 10, 33; 10:28, 35-45; 14:19, 29-31, 32-37, 50, 66-72).

25 map Fpr location see Map1 C1; Map2 F4.

26 tn Grk “he asked his disciples, saying to them.” The phrase λέγων αὐτοῖς (legwn autois) is redundant in contemporary English and has not been translated.

27 tn Grk “And they said to him, saying.” The participle λέγοντες (legontes) is redundant in contemporary English and has not been translated.

28 sn The appearance of Elijah would mean that the end time had come. According to 2 Kgs 2:11, Elijah was still alive. In Mal 4:5 it is said that Elijah would be the precursor of Messiah.

29 tn Grk “Answering, Peter said to him.” This is redundant in contemporary English and has been simplified to “Peter answered him.”

30 tn Or “the Messiah”; both “Christ” (Greek) and “Messiah” (Hebrew and Aramaic) mean “one who has been anointed.”

sn The term χριστός (cristos) was originally an adjective (“anointed”), developing in LXX into a substantive (“an anointed one”), then developing still further into a technical generic term (“the anointed one”). In the intertestamental period it developed further into a technical term referring to the hoped-for anointed one, that is, a specific individual. In the NT the development starts there (technical-specific), is so used in the gospels, and then develops in Paul to mean virtually Jesus’ last name.

31 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “Then” to indicate the conclusion of the episode.

32 sn Mark 8:27-10:52. The entire section 8:27-10:52 is built around three passion predictions of Jesus (8:31; 9:31; 10:33). These predictions form the structure of the section, the content for the section (Jesus’ suffering, death, and the meaning of genuine discipleship) and the mood of the section (i.e., a somber mood). What is interesting is that after each passion prediction, Mark records both the misunderstanding of the disciples and then Jesus’ teaching on the nature of his death and what genuine discipleship is all about: (1) denying oneself (8:34-38); (2) humility and serving (9:33-37); (3) suffering, humble service, and not lording it over people (10:35-45). For further discussion of the structure of the passage, see W. L. Lane, Mark (NICNT), 292-94.

33 tn Grk “people’s.”

34 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “so” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

35 tn Grk “And answering, Peter said to Jesus.” The participle ἀποκριθείς (apokriqeis) is redundant and has not been translated.

36 tn Or “dwellings,” “booths” (referring to the temporary booths constructed in the celebration of the feast of Tabernacles).

sn Peter apparently wanted to celebrate the feast of Tabernacles or Booths that looked forward to the end and wanted to treat Moses, Elijah, and Jesus as equals by making three shelters (one for each). It was actually a way of expressing honor to Jesus, but the next few verses make it clear that it was not enough honor.

37 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

38 map For location see Map1 D2; Map2 C3; Map3 B2.

39 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

40 sn Peter wants reassurance that the disciples’ response and sacrifice has been noticed.

41 tn Grk “We have left everything and followed you.” Koine Greek often used paratactic structure when hypotactic was implied.

42 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

43 tn Grk “baptism I am baptized with.” This same change has been made in v. 39.

44 sn No more naïve words have ever been spoken as those found here coming from James and John, “We are able.” They said it with such confidence and ease, yet they had little clue as to what they were affirming. In the next sentence Jesus confirms that they will indeed suffer for his name.

45 sn After the first passion prediction in 8:31 Jesus rebuked Peter as having been used by Satan. After the second passion prediction in 9:31 the disciples were concerned about who would be the greatest in the kingdom. After the third passion prediction in 10:33 James and John asked for positions of honor and rulership in the kingdom, revealing their complete misunderstanding of the nature of the kingdom and exposing their inadequacy as true disciples of Jesus. Jesus replied that such positions were for those for whom it has been prepared.

46 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “now” to indicate the transition to a new topic.

47 tn Grk “the ten.”

48 tn The word “this” is not in the Greek text, but is supplied. Direct objects were often omitted in Greek when clear from the context.

49 tn Though δοῦλος (doulos) is normally translated “servant,” the word does not bear the connotation of a free individual serving another. BDAG notes that “‘servant’ for ‘slave’ is largely confined to Biblical transl. and early American times…in normal usage at the present time the two words are carefully distinguished” (BDAG 260 s.v. 1). The most accurate translation is “bondservant” (sometimes found in the ASV for δοῦλος), in that it often indicates one who sells himself into slavery to another. But as this is archaic, few today understand its force.

50 sn The Greek word for ransom (λύτρον, lutron) is found here and in Matt 20:28 and refers to the payment of a price in order to purchase the freedom of a slave. The idea of Jesus as the “ransom” is that he paid the price with his own life by standing in humanity’s place as a substitute, enduring the judgment that was deserved for sin.

51 tn Grk “Truly (ἀμήν, amhn), I say to you.”

52 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Peter) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

53 tn Grk “said emphatically.”

54 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

55 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

56 tn Grk “and James,” but καί (kai) has not been translated since English normally uses a coordinating conjunction only between the last two elements in a series of three or more.

57 tn The word means “Father” in Aramaic.

58 sn This cup alludes to the wrath of God that Jesus would experience (in the form of suffering and death) for us. See Ps 11:6; 75:8-9; Isa 51:17, 19, 22 for this figure.

59 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

60 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

61 tn Grk “they”; the referent (Jesus’ disciples) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

62 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “now” to indicate the transition to a new topic.

63 tn The Greek term here is παιδίσκη (paidiskh), referring to a slave girl or slave woman.

64 tn Grk “he denied it, saying.” The participle λέγων (legwn) is redundant in English and has not been translated.

65 tn Grk “I do not know or understand what you are saying.” In the translation this is taken as a hendiadys (a figure of speech where two terms express a single meaning, usually for emphatic reasons).

66 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

67 tc Several important witnesses (א B L W Ψ* 579 892 2427 pc) lack the words “and a rooster crowed.” The fact that such good and early Alexandrian witnesses lack these words makes this textual problem difficult to decide, especially because the words receive support from other witnesses, some of which are fairly decent (A C D Θ Ψc 067 Ë1,13 33 [1424] Ï lat). The omission could have been intentional on the part of some Alexandrian scribes who wished to bring this text in line with the other Gospel accounts that only mention a rooster crowing once (Matt 26:74; Luke 22:60; John 18:27). The insertion could be an attempt to make the fulfillment of Jesus’ prophecy in 14:30 more explicit. Internally, the words “and a rooster crowed” fit Mark’s Gospel here, not only in view of 14:30, “before a rooster crows twice,” but also in view of the mention of “a second time” in 14:71 (a reading which is much more textually secure). Nevertheless, a decision is difficult.

tn A real rooster crowing is probably in view here (rather than the Roman trumpet call known as gallicinium), in part due to the fact that Mark mentions the rooster crowing twice. See the discussion at Matt 26:74.

68 tn Grk “Truly you are.”

69 tn This occurrence of the word ἀλέκτωρ (alektwr, “rooster”) is anarthrous and consequently may not point back explicitly to the rooster which had crowed previously in v. 68. The reason for the anarthrous construction is most likely to indicate generically that some rooster crowed. Further, the translation of ἀλέκτωρ as an indefinite noun retains the subtlety of the Greek in only hinting at the Lord’s prediction v. 30. See also NAB, TEV, NASB.

70 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

71 tn Grk “he wept deeply.”



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