Internet Verse Search Commentaries Word Analysis ITL - draft

John 20:28

Context
NET ©

Thomas replied to him, 1  “My Lord and my God!” 2 

NIV ©

Thomas said to him, "My Lord and my God!"

NASB ©

Thomas answered and said to Him, "My Lord and my God!"

NLT ©

"My Lord and my God!" Thomas exclaimed.

MSG ©

Thomas said, "My Master! My God!"

BBE ©

And Thomas said in answer, My Lord and my God!

NRSV ©

Thomas answered him, "My Lord and my God!"

NKJV ©

And Thomas answered and said to Him, "My Lord and my God!"


KJV
And
<2532>
Thomas
<2381>
answered
<611> (5662)
and
<2532>
said
<2036> (5627)
unto him
<846>_,
My
<3450>
Lord
<2962>
and
<2532>
my
<3450>
God
<2316>_.
NASB ©
Thomas
<2381>
answered
<611>
and said
<3004>
to Him, "My Lord
<2962>
and my God
<2316>
!"
GREEK
apekriyh
<611> (5662)
V-ADI-3S
ywmav
<2381>
N-NSM
kai
<2532>
CONJ
eipen
<2036> (5627)
V-2AAI-3S
autw
<846>
P-DSM
o
<3588>
T-NSM
kuriov
<2962>
N-NSM
mou
<3450>
P-1GS
kai
<2532>
CONJ
o
<3588>
T-NSM
yeov
<2316>
N-NSM
mou
<3450>
P-1GS
NET © [draft] ITL
Thomas
<2381>
replied
<611>

<2036>
to him
<846>
, “My
<3450>
Lord
<2962>
and
<2532>
my
<3450>
God
<2316>
!”
NET ©

Thomas replied to him, 1  “My Lord and my God!” 2 

NET © Notes

tn Grk “answered and said to him.”

sn Should Thomas’ exclamation be understood as two subjects with the rest of the sentence omitted (“My Lord and my God has truly risen from the dead”), as predicate nominatives (“You are my Lord and my God”), or as vocatives (“My Lord and my God!”)? Probably the most likely is something between the second and third alternatives. It seems that the second is slightly more likely here, because the context appears confessional. Thomas’ statement, while it may have been an exclamation, does in fact confess the faith which he had previously lacked, and Jesus responds to Thomas’ statement in the following verse as if it were a confession. With the proclamation by Thomas here, it is difficult to see how any more profound analysis of Jesus’ person could be given. It echoes 1:1 and 1:14 together: The Word was God, and the Word became flesh (Jesus of Nazareth). The Fourth Gospel opened with many other titles for Jesus: the Lamb of God (1:29, 36); the Son of God (1:34, 49); Rabbi (1:38); Messiah (1:41); the King of Israel (1:49); the Son of Man (1:51). Now the climax is reached with the proclamation by Thomas, “My Lord and my God,” and the reader has come full circle from 1:1, where the author had introduced him to who Jesus was, to 20:28, where the last of the disciples has come to the full realization of who Jesus was. What Jesus had predicted in John 8:28 had come to pass: “When you lift up the Son of Man, then you will know that I am he” (Grk “I am”). By being lifted up in crucifixion (which led in turn to his death, resurrection, and exaltation with the Father) Jesus has revealed his true identity as both Lord (κύριος [kurios], used by the LXX to translate Yahweh) and God (θεός [qeos], used by the LXX to translate Elohim).



TIP #19: Use the Study Dictionary to learn and to research all aspects of 20,000+ terms/words. [ALL]
created in 0.02 seconds
powered by bible.org