Internet Verse Search Commentaries Word Analysis ITL - draft

Colossians 1:22

Context
NET ©

but now he has reconciled you 1  by his physical body through death to present you holy, without blemish, and blameless before him –

NIV ©

But now he has reconciled you by Christ’s physical body through death to present you holy in his sight, without blemish and free from accusation—

NASB ©

yet He has now reconciled you in His fleshly body through death, in order to present you before Him holy and blameless and beyond reproach—

NLT ©

yet now he has brought you back as his friends. He has done this through his death on the cross in his own human body. As a result, he has brought you into the very presence of God, and you are holy and blameless as you stand before him without a single fault.

MSG ©

But now, by giving himself completely at the Cross, actually [dying] for you, Christ brought you over to God's side and put your lives together, whole and holy in his presence.

BBE ©

In the body of his flesh through death, so that you might be holy and without sin and free from all evil before him:

NRSV ©

he has now reconciled in his fleshly body through death, so as to present you holy and blameless and irreproachable before him—

NKJV ©

in the body of His flesh through death, to present you holy, and blameless, and above reproach in His sight––


KJV
In
<1722>
the body
<4983>
of his
<846>
flesh
<4561>
through
<1223>
death
<2288>_,
to present
<3936> (5658)
you
<5209>
holy
<40>
and
<2532>
unblameable
<299>
and
<2532>
unreproveable
<410>
in his
<846>
sight
<2714>_:
NASB ©
yet
<1161>
He has now
<3570>
reconciled
<604>
you in His fleshly
<4561>
body
<4983>
through
<1223>
death
<2288>
, in order to present
<3936>
you before
<2714>
Him holy
<40>
and blameless
<299>
and beyond
<410>
reproach
<410>
--
GREEK
en
<1722>
PREP
tw
<3588>
T-DSN
swmati
<4983>
N-DSN
thv
<3588>
T-GSF
sarkov
<4561>
N-GSF
autou
<846>
P-GSM
dia
<1223>
PREP
tou
<3588>
T-GSM
yanatou
<2288>
N-GSM
parasthsai
<3936> (5658)
V-AAN
umav
<5209>
P-2AP
agiouv
<40>
A-APM
kai
<2532>
CONJ
amwmouv
<299>
A-APM
kai
<2532>
CONJ
anegklhtouv
<410>
A-APM
katenwpion
<2714>
PREP
autou
<846>
P-GSM
NET © [draft] ITL
but now he has reconciled you by
<1722>
his
<846>
physical
<4561>
body
<4983>
through
<1223>
death
<2288>
to present
<3936>
you
<5209>
holy
<40>
, without
<2532>
blemish
<299>
, and
<2532>
blameless
<410>
before
<2714>
him
<846>
NET ©

but now he has reconciled you 1  by his physical body through death to present you holy, without blemish, and blameless before him –

NET © Notes

tc Some of the better representatives of the Alexandrian and Western texts have a passive verb here instead of the active ἀποκατήλλαξεν (apokathllaxen, “he has reconciled”): ἀποκατηλλάγητε (apokathllaghte) in (Ì46) B, ἀποκατήλλακται [sic] (apokathllaktai) in 33, and ἀποκαταλλαγέντες (apokatallagente") in D* F G. Yet the active verb is strongly supported by א A C D2 Ψ 048 075 [0278] 1739 1881 Ï lat sy. Internally, the passive creates an anacoluthon in that it looks back to the accusative ὑμᾶς (Juma", “you”) of v. 21 and leaves the following παραστῆσαι (parasthsai) dangling (“you were reconciled…to present you”). The passive reading is certainly the harder reading. As such, it may well explain the rise of the other readings. At the same time, it is possible that the passive was produced by scribes who wanted some symmetry between the ποτε (pote, “at one time”) of v. 21 and the νυνὶ δέ (nuni de, “but now”) of v. 22: Since a passive periphrastic participle is used in v. 21, there may have a temptation to produce a corresponding passive form in v. 22, handling the ὑμᾶς of v. 21 by way of constructio ad sensum. Since παραστῆσαι occurs ten words later, it may not have been considered in this scribal modification. Further, the Western reading (ἀποκαταλλαγέντες) hardly seems to have arisen from ἀποκατηλλάγητε (contra TCGNT 555). As difficult as this decision is, the preferred reading is the active form because it is superior externally and seems to explain the rise of all forms of the passive readings.

tn The direct object is omitted in the Greek text, but it is clear from context that “you” (ὑμᾶς, Jumas) is implied.



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