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GREEK: 3465 Musia Musia
NAVE: Mysia
EBD: Mysia
SMITH: MYSIA
ISBE: MYSIA
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Mysia

In Bible versions:

Mysia: NET AVS NIV NRSV NASB TEV
a the northern portion of the Roman province of Asia

criminal; abominable
Google Maps: Mysia (39° 30´, 26° 4´)

Greek

Strongs #3465: Musia Musia

Mysia = "land of beach trees"

1) a province of Asia Minor on the shore of the Aegean Sea, between
Lydia and Popontis; it included the cities of Pergamos, Troas, and
Assos

3465 Musia moo-see'-ah

of uncertain origin; Mysia, a region of Asia Minor:-Mysia.

Mysia [EBD]

a province in the north-west of Asia Minor. On his first voyage to Europe (Acts 16:7, 8) Paul passed through this province and embarked at its chief port Troas.

Mysia [NAVE]

MYSIA
A province of Asia Minor. Paul visits, Acts 16:7, 8.

MYSIA [SMITH]

(land of beech trees) (Acts 16:7,8) was the region about the frontier of the provinces of Asia and Bithynia. The term is evidently used in an ethnological, not a political, sense.

MYSIA [ISBE]

MYSIA - mish'-i-a (Musia): A country in the northwestern part of Asia Minor, which formed an important part of the Roman province of Asia. Though its boundaries were always vague, it may be said to have extended on the North to the Sea of Marmora on the East to Bithynia and Phrygia, on the South to Lydia, and on the West to Hellespont. According to some authors it included the Troad. Its history is chiefly that of important cities, of which Assos, Troas, and Adramyttium on the border of Lydia, are mentioned in the New Testament. When Mysia became a part of the Roman province of Asia in 190 BC, its old name fell into disuse, and it was then generally known as the Hellespontus. According to Acts 16:7,8, Paul passed through the country, but without stopping to preach, until he reached Troas on the coast, yet tradition says that he founded churches at Poketos and Cyzicus. Onesiphorus, who was martyred some time between 109 and 114 AD, during the proconsulate of Adrian, is supposed to have evangelized this part of Asia. See The Expository Times, IX, 495 f.

E. J. Banks




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