Study Dictionary
Index A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Table of Contents
HEBREW: 4311 abdym Meyd@ba'
NAVE: Medeba
EBD: Medeba
SMITH: MEDEBA
ISBE: MEDEBA
Meconah | Medaba | Medad | Medan | Meddling | Medeba | Medes | Medes, Media | Median, The | Mediation | Medicine

Medeba

In Bible versions:

Medeba: NET AVS NIV NRSV NASB TEV
a town and a plain

waters of grief; waters springing up
NETBible Maps: Map7 G1 ; Map8 C3 ; OT4 D6 ; OT5 D6 ; NT1 D6
Google Maps: Medeba (31° 43´, 35° 47´)

Hebrew

Strongs #04311: abdym Meyd@ba'

Medeba = "water of rest"

1) a town in Moab assigned to Reuben and located 4 miles (6 km)
southwest of Heshbon; still extant

4311 Meydba' may-deb-aw'

from 4325 and 1679; water of quiet; Medeba, a place in
Palestine:-Medeba.
see HEBREW for 04325
see HEBREW for 01679

Medeba [EBD]

waters of quiet, an ancient Moabite town (Num. 21:30). It was assigned to the tribe of Reuben (Josh. 13:16). Here was fought the great battle in which Joab defeated the Ammonites and their allies (1 Chr. 19:7-15; comp. 2 Sam. 10:6-14). In the time of Isaiah (15:2) the Moabites regained possession of it from the Ammonites. (See HANUN.)

The ruins of this important city, now Madeba or Madiyabah, are seen about 8 miles south-west of Heshbon, and 14 east of the Dead Sea. Among these are the ruins of what must have been a large temple, and of three cisterns of considerable extent, which are now dry. These cisterns may have originated the name Medeba, "waters of quiet." (See OMRI.)

Medeba [NAVE]

MEDEBA
A city of Moab, Num. 21:30.
An idolatrous high place, Isa. 15:2.
Allotted to Reuben, Josh. 13:9, 16.
David defeats army and the Ammonites at, 1 Chr. 19:7-15.

MEDEBA [SMITH]

(water of rest), a town on the eastern side of Jordan, first alluded to in (Numbers 21:30) Here it seems to denote the limit of the territory of Heshbon. It next occurs in the enumeration of the country divided among the transjordanic tribes, (Joshua 13:9) as giving its name to a district of level downs called "the Mishor of Medeba" or "the Mishor on Medeba." At the time of the conquest Medeba belonged to the Amorites, apparently one of the towns taken from Moab by them. In the time of Ahaz Medeba was a sanctuary of Moab. (Isaiah 15:2) It has retained its name down, our own times, and lies four miles southeast of Heshbon, on it rounded but rocky hill.

MEDEBA [ISBE]

MEDEBA - med'-e-ba (medhebha'; Maidaba, Medaba): The name may mean "gently flowing water," but the sense is doubtful. This city is first mentioned along with Heshbon and Dibon in an account of Israel's conquests (Nu 21:30). It lay in the Mishor, the high pastoral land of Moab. The district in which the city stood is called the Mishor or plain of Medeba in the description of the territory assigned to Reuben (Josh 13:9), or the plain by Medeba (Josh 13:16). Here the Ammonites and their Syrian allies put the battle in array against Joab, and were signally defeated (1 Ch 19:7). This must have left the place definitely in the possession of Israel. But it must have changed hands several times. It was taken by Omri, evidently from Moab; and Mesha claims to have recovered possession of it (M S, ll. 7,8,29,30). It would naturally fall to Israel under Jeroboam II; but in Isa 15:2 it is referred to as a city of Moab. It also figures in later Jewish history. John, son of Mattathias, was captured and put to death by the Jambri, a robber tribe from Medeba. This outrage was amply avenged by Jonathan and Simon, who ambushed a marriage party of the Jambri as they were bringing a noble bride from Gabbatha, slew them all and took their ornaments (1 Macc 9:36 ff; Ant, XII, i, 2, 4). Medeba was captured by Hyrcanus "not without the greatest distress of his army" (Ant., XIII, ix, 1). It was taken by Janneus from the Nabateans. Hyrcanus promised to restore it with other cities so taken to Aretas in return for help to secure him on the Judean throne (ibid., xv, 4; XIV, i, 4). Ptolemy speaks of it as a town in Arabia Petrea, between Bostra and Petra. Eusebius and Jerome knew it under its ancient name (Onomasticon, under the word). It became the seat of a bishropric, and is mentioned in the Acts of the Council of Chalcedon (451 AD), and in other ecclesiastical lists.

The ancient city is represented by the modern Madeba, a ruined site with an Arab village, crowning a low hill, some 6 miles South of Heshbon, with which it was connected by a Roman road. The ruins, which are considerable, date mainly from Christian times. The surrounding walls can be traced in practically their whole circuit. There is a large tank, now dry, measuring 108 yds. X 103 yds., and about 12 ft. in depth. In 1880 it was colonized by some Christian families from Kerak, among whom the Latins carry on mission work. In December, 1896, a most interesting mosaic was found. It proved to be a map of part of Palestine and Lower Egypt of the time of Justinian. Unfortunately it is much damaged. An account of it will be found in Palestine Exploration Fund Statement, 1897, 213 ff, 239; 1898, 85, 177 ff, 251.

W. Ewing




TIP #05: Try Double Clicking on any word for instant search. [ALL]
created in 0.03 seconds
powered by bible.org