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(1.00) (Jos 9:5)

tn Heb “all the bread of their provisions.”

(0.83) (Rom 13:14)

tn Grk “make no provision for the flesh unto desires.”

(0.83) (Psa 78:25)

tn Heb “provision he sent to them to satisfaction.”

(0.67) (Psa 132:15)

tn Heb “I will greatly bless her provision.” The infinitive absolute is used to emphasize the verb.

(0.67) (Gen 21:22)

sn God is with you. Abimelech and Phicol recognized that Abraham enjoyed special divine provision and protection.

(0.58) (2Pe 1:5)

sn The reason given is all the provisions God has made for the believer, mentioned in vv. 3-4.

(0.50) (Pro 30:8)

sn Agur requested an honest life (not deceitful) and a balanced life (not self-sufficient). The second request about his provision is clarified in v. 9.

(0.50) (Pro 16:22)

tn Heb “fountain of life.” The point of the metaphor is that like a fountain this wisdom will be a constant provision for living in this world.

(0.47) (Mat 10:9)

sn The gold, silver, and copper probably represent varying degrees of provision, with gold the most valuable and copper the least. Jesus’ point appears to be that not even minimal provision (copper) was to be taken along, forcing the disciple to be totally dependent on God.

(0.42) (1Jo 2:20)

sn The statement you all know probably constitutes an indirect allusion to the provisions of the new covenant mentioned in Jer 31 (see especially Jer 31:34). See also R. E. Brown, The Epistles of John [AB], 349.

(0.42) (Luk 11:2)

sn When you pray. What follows, although traditionally known as the Lord’s prayer, is really the disciples’ prayer. It represents how they are to approach God, by acknowledging his uniqueness and their need for his provision and protection.

(0.42) (Mat 6:9)

sn Pray this way. What follows, although traditionally known as the Lord’s prayer, is really the disciples’ prayer. It represents how they are to approach God, by acknowledging his uniqueness and their need for his provision and protection.

(0.42) (Isa 58:14)

tn Heb “and I will cause you to ride upon the heights of the land.” The statement seems to be an allusion to Deut 32:13, where it is associated, as here, with God’s abundant provision of food.

(0.42) (Isa 48:21)

sn The translation above (present tense) assumes that this verse describes God’s provision for returning Babylonian exiles (see v. 20; 35:6; 49:10) in terms reminiscent of the Exodus from Egypt (see Exod 17:6).

(0.42) (Pro 27:27)

sn This part of the proverb shows the proper interplay between human labor and divine provision. It teaches people to take care of what they have because it will not last forever.

(0.42) (1Ch 21:3)

tn Heb “Why should it become guilt for Israel?” David’s decision betrays an underlying trust in his own strength rather than in divine provision. See also 1 Chr 27:23-24.

(0.42) (Exo 23:25)

sn On this unusual clause B. Jacob says that it is the reversal of the curse in Genesis because the “bread and water” represent the field work and ground suitability for abundant blessing of provisions (Exodus, 734).

(0.42) (Exo 15:25)

sn U. Cassuto notes that here is the clue to the direction of the narrative: Israel needed God’s instruction, the Law, if they were going to enjoy his provisions (Exodus, 184).

(0.41) (Jos 9:4)

tc Heb “and they went and [?].” The root and meaning of the verb form יִצְטַיָּרוּ (yitstayyaru) are uncertain. The Hebrew text form most likely should be יִצְטַיָּדוּ (yitstayyadu), read by some Hebrew mss and ancient versions, from the root צוּד (tsud, “take provisions,” BDB 845 s.v. II צוד) which also occurs in v. 11. Note NRSV “they went and prepared provisions”; cf. NEB “They went and disguised themselves”; NIV “they went as a delegation.”

(0.36) (Num 5:18)

sn This ancient ritual seems to have functioned like a lie detector test, with all the stress and tension involved. It can be compared to water tests in the pagan world, with the exception that in Israel it was stacked more toward an innocent verdict. It seems to have been a temporary provision, for this is the only place that it appears, and no provision is made for its use later. It may have served as a didactic force, warning more than actually legislating. No provision is made in it for a similar charge to be brought against the man, but in the case of the suspicion of the woman the man would be very hesitant to demand this test given the harshness on false witnessing in Israel. The passage remains a rather strange section of the Law.



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