Results 81 - 100 of 105 for proclaimed (0.000 seconds)
(0.15)(Jer 34:9)

tn <i>Hebi> “after King Zedekiah made a covenantto proclaim liberty to them [the slaves mentioned in the next verse] so that each would send away free his male slave and his female slave, the Hebrew man and the Hebrew woman, so that a man would not do work by them, by a Judean, his brother [this latter phrase is explicative ofthembecause it repeats the preposition in front ofthem”].” The complex Hebrew syntax has been broken down into shorter English sentences, but an attempt has been made to retain the proper subordinations.

(0.15)(Isa 40:9)

tn The second feminine singular imperatives are addressed to personified Zion/Jerusalem, who is here told to ascend a high hill and proclaim the good news of the Lords return to the other towns of Judah. <data ref="Bible:Is 41:27">Isa 41:27data> and <data ref="Bible:Is 52:7">52:7data> speak of a herald sent <i>toi> Zion, but the masculine singular form <span class="hebrew">מְבַשֵּׂרspan> (<span class="translit">m<sup>esup>vasserspan>) is used in these verses, in contrast to the feminine singular form <span class="hebrew">מְבַשֶּׂרֶתspan> (<span class="translit">m<sup>esup>vasseretspan>) employed in <data ref="Bible:Is 40:9">40:9data>, where Zion is addressed <i>asi> a herald.

(0.15)(Sos 8:12)

tn Each of the three terms in this line has the first person common singular suffix which is repeated three times for emphasis: <span class="hebrew">כַּרְמִיspan> (<span class="translit">karmispan>, “my vineyard”), <span class="hebrew">שֶׁלִּיspan> (<span class="translit">shellispan>, “which belongs to me”), and <span class="hebrew">לְפָנָיspan> (<span class="translit">l<sup>esup>fanaspan>, “at my disposal”). In contrast to King Solomon, who owns the vineyard at Baal Hamon and who can buy and sell anything in the vineyard that he wishes, she proclaims that hervineyard” (= herself or her body) belongs to her alone. In contrast to the vineyard, which can be leased out, and its fruit, which can be bought or sold, hervineyardis not for sale. Her love must and is to be freely given.

(0.15)(Pro 1:21)

tc MT reads <span class="hebrew">הֹמִיּוֹתspan> (<span class="translit">homiyyotspan>, “noisy streets”; Qal participle feminine plural from <span class="hebrew">הָמָהspan> [<span class="translit">hamahspan>], “to murmur; to roar”), referring to the busy, bustling place where the street branches off from the gate complex. The LXX reads <span class="greek">τειχέωνspan> (<span class="translit">teicheōnspan>) which reflects <span class="hebrew">חֹמוֹתspan> (<span class="translit">khomotspan>), “walls” (feminine plural noun from <span class="hebrew">חוֹמָהspan> [<span class="translit">khomahspan>], “wall”): “She proclaims on the summits of the walls.” MT is preferred because it is the more difficult form. The LXX textual error was caused by simple omission of <span class="hebrew">יspan> (<span class="translit">yodspan>). In addition, the LXX expands the verse to read, “she sits at the gates of the princes, at the gates of the city she boldly says.” The shorter MT reading is preferred.

(0.15)(Deu 13:1)

tn <i>Hebi> “or a dreamer of dreams” (so KJV, ASV, NASB). The difference between a prophet (<span class="hebrew">נָבִיאspan>, <span class="translit">naviʾspan>) and one who foretells by dreams (<span class="hebrew">חֹלֵםspan>, <span class="translit">kholemspan>) was not so much one of officefor both received revelation by dreams (cf. <data ref="Bible:Nu 12:6">Num 12:6data>)—as it was of function or emphasis. The prophet was more a proclaimer and interpreter of revelation whereas the one who foretold by dreams was a receiver of revelation. In later times the role of the one who foretold by dreams was abused and thus denigrated as compared to that of the prophet (cf. <data ref="Bible:Je 23:28">Jer 23:28data>).

(0.15)(Exo 34:1)

sn The restoration of the faltering community continues in this chapter. First, Moses is instructed to make new tablets and take them to the mountain (<data ref="Bible:Ex 34:1-4">1-4data>). Then, through the promised theophany God proclaims his moral character (<data ref="Bible:Ex 34:5-7">5-7data>). Moses responds with the reiteration of the intercession (<data ref="Bible:Ex 34:8-9">8-9data>), and God responds with the renewal of the covenant (<data ref="Bible:Ex 34:10-28">10-28data>). To put these into expository form, as principles, the chapter would run as follows: I. God provides for spiritual renewal (<data ref="Bible:Ex 34:1-4">1-4data>), II. God reminds people of his moral standard (<data ref="Bible:Ex 34:5-9">5-9data>), III. God renews his covenant promises and stipulations (<data ref="Bible:Ex 34:10-28">10-28data>).

(0.13)(Rev 1:1)

tn The phrase <span class="greek">ἀποκάλυψις ᾿Ιησοῦ Χριστοῦspan> (<span class="translit">apokalupsis Iēsou Christouspan>, “the revelation of Jesus Christ”) could be interpreted as either an objective genitive (“the revelation about Jesus Christ”), subjective genitive (“the revelation from Jesus Christ”), or both (M. Zerwicksgeneralgenitive [<i>Biblical Greeki>, §§36-39]; D. B. Wallacesplenarygenitive [<i>ExSyni> 119-21]). In <data ref="Bible:Re 1:1">1:1data> and <data ref="Bible:Re 22:16">22:16data> it is clear that Jesus has sent his angel to proclaim the message to John; thus the message is from Christ, and this would be a subjective genitive. On a broader scale, though, the revelation is about Christ, so this would be an objective genitive. One important point to note is that the phrase under consideration is best regarded as the title of the book and therefore refers to the whole of the work in all its aspects. This fact favors considering this as a plenary genitive.

(0.13)(1Co 15:29)

sn Many suggestions have been offered for the puzzling expression <i>baptized for the deadi>. There are up to 200 different explanations for the passage; a summary is given by K. C. Thompson, “I Corinthians 15, 29 and Baptism for the Dead,” <i>Studia Evangelicai> 2.1 (TU 87), 647-59. The most likely interpretation is that some Corinthians had undergone baptism to bear witness to the faith of fellow believers who had died without experiencing that rite themselves. Pauls reference to the practice here is neither a recommendation nor a condemnation. He simply uses it as evidence from the lives of the Corinthians themselves to bolster his larger argument, begun in <data ref="Bible:1Co 15:12">15:12data>, that resurrection from the dead is a present reality in Christ and a future reality for them. Whatever they may have proclaimed, the Corinthiansactions demonstrated that they had hope for a bodily resurrection.

(0.13)(Joh 12:13)

tn The expression <span class="greek">῾Ωσαννάspan> (<span class="translit">hōsannaspan>, literally in Hebrew, “O Lord, save”) in the quotation from <data ref="Bible:Ps 118:25-26">Ps 118:25-26data> was probably by this time a familiar liturgical expression of praise, on the order ofHail to the king,” although both the underlying Aramaic and Hebrew expressions meantO Lord, save us.” As in <data ref="Bible:Mk 11:9">Mark 11:9data> the introductory <span class="greek">ὡσαννάspan> is followed by the words of <data ref="Bible:Ps 118:25">Ps 118:25data>, <span class="greek">εὐλογημένος ὁ ἐρχόμενος ἐν ὀνόματι κυρίουspan> (<span class="translit">eulogēmenos ho erchomenos en onomati kuriouspan>), although in the Fourth Gospel the author adds for good measure <span class="greek">καὶ ὁ βασιλεὺς τοῦ ᾿Ισραήλspan> (<span class="translit">kai ho basileus tou Israēlspan>). In words familiar to every Jew, the author is indicating that at this point every messianic expectation is now at the point of realization. It is clear from the words of the psalm shouted by the crowd that Jesus is being proclaimed as messianic king. See E. Lohse, <i>TDNTi> 9:682-84.

(0.13)(Joh 9:22)

sn This reference to excommunication from the Jewish synagogue for those who had made some sort of confession about Jesus being the Messiah is dismissed as anachronistic by some (e.g., Barrett) and nonhistorical by others. In later Jewish practice there were at least two forms of excommunication: a temporary ban for thirty days, and a permanent ban. But whether these applied in NT times is far from certain. There is no substantial evidence for a formal ban on Christians until later than this Gospel could possibly have been written. This may be a reference to some form of excommunication adopted as a contingency to deal with those who were proclaiming Jesus to be the Messiah. If so, there is no other record of the procedure than here. It was probably local, limited to the area around Jerusalem. See also the note on <i>synagoguei> in <data ref="Bible:Jn 6:59">6:59data>.

(0.13)(Joh 1:20)

sn “<i>I am not the Christi>.” A 3rd century work, the pseudo-Clementine <i>Recognitionsi> (1.54 and 1.60 in the Latin text; the statement is not as clear in the Syriac version) records that Johns followers proclaimed him to be the Messiah. There is no clear evidence that they did so in the 1st century, howeverbut <data ref="Bible:Lu 3:15">Luke 3:15data> indicates some wondered. Concerning the <i>Christi>, the term <span class="greek">χριστόςspan> (<span class="translit">christosspan>) was originally an adjective (“anointed”), developing in LXX into a substantive (“an anointed one”), then developing still further into a technical generic term (“the anointed one”). In the intertestamental period it developed further into a technical term referring to the hoped-for anointed one, that is, a specific individual. In the NT the development starts there (technical-specific), is so used in the gospels, and then develops in Paul to mean virtually Jesuslast name.

(0.13)(Mar 11:9)

tn The expression <span class="greek">῾Ωσαννάspan> (<span class="translit">hōsannaspan>, literally in Hebrew, “O Lord, save”) in the quotation from <data ref="Bible:Ps 118:25-26">Ps 118:25-26data> was probably by this time a familiar liturgical expression of praise, on the order ofHail to the king,” although both the underlying Aramaic and Hebrew expressions meantO Lord, save us.” The introductory <span class="greek">ὡσαννάspan> is followed by the words of <data ref="Bible:Ps 118:25">Ps 118:25data>, <span class="greek">εὐλογημένος ὁ ἐρχόμενος ἐν ὀνόματι κυρίουspan> (<span class="translit">eulogēmenos ho erchomenos en onomati kuriouspan>), although in the Fourth Gospel the author adds for good measure <span class="greek">καὶ ὁ βασιλεὺς τοῦ ᾿Ισραήλspan> (<span class="translit">kai ho basileus tou Israēlspan>). In words familiar to every Jew, the author is indicating that at this point every messianic expectation is now at the point of realization. It is clear from the words of the psalm shouted by the crowd that Jesus is being proclaimed as messianic king. See E. Lohse, <i>TDNTi> 9:682-84.

(0.13)(Nah 1:15)

sn The <i>sacred vows to praise Godi> were often made by Israelites as a pledge to proclaim the mercy of the <span class="smcaps">Lordspan> if he would be gracious to deliver (e.g., <data ref="Bible:Ge 28:20">Gen 28:20data>; <data ref="Bible:Ge 31:13">31:13data>; <data ref="Bible:Le 7:16">Lev 7:16data>; <data ref="Bible:Jdg 11:30">Judg 11:30data>, <data ref="Bible:Jdg 11:39">39data>; <data ref="Bible:1Sa 1:11">1 Sam 1:11data>, <data ref="Bible:1Sa 1:21">21data>; <data ref="Bible:2Sa 15:7-8">2 Sam 15:7-8data>; <data ref="Bible:Ps 22:25">Pss 22:25data> [26]; <data ref="Bible:Ps 50:14">50:14data>; <data ref="Bible:Ps 56:12">56:12data> [13]; <data ref="Bible:Ps 61:5">61:5data> [6], <data ref="Bible:Ps 61:8">8data> [9]; <data ref="Bible:Ps 65:1">65:1data> [2]; <data ref="Bible:Ps 2:9">66:13; 116:14, 18data>; <data ref="Bible:Ec 5:4">Eccl 5:4data> [3]; <data ref="Bible:Jon 1:16">Jonah 1:16data>; <data ref="Bible:Jon 2:9">2:9data> [10]). The wordsto praise Godare not in the Hebrew, but are added in the translation for clarification.

(0.13)(Isa 11:4)

tc The Hebrew text reads literally, “and he will strike the earth with the scepter of his mouth.” Some have suggested that in this context <span class="hebrew">אֶרֶץspan> (<span class="translit">ʾeretsspan>, “earth”) as an object of judgment seems too broad in scope. The parallelism is tighter if one emends the word to <span class="hebrew">ץspan>(<span class="hebrew">יspan>)<span class="hebrew">עָרִspan> (<span class="translit">ʿaritsspan>, “potentate, tyrant”). The phrasescepter of his mouthrefers to the royal (notescepter”) decrees that he proclaims with his mouth. Because these decrees will have authority and power (see v. <data ref="Bible:Is 11:2">2data>) behind them, they can be described asstrikingthe tyrants down. Nevertheless, the MT reading may not need emending. Isaiah refers to the entireearthas the object of Gods judgment in several places without specifying the wicked as the object of the judgment (<data ref="Bible:Is 24:17-21">Isa 24:17-21data>; <data ref="Bible:Is 26:9">26:9data>, <data ref="Bible:Is 26:21">21data>; <data ref="Bible:Is 28:22">28:22data>; cf. <data ref="Bible:Is 13:11">13:11data>).

(0.13)(Job 9:21)

tn Dhorme, in an effort to avoid tautology, makes this a question: “Am I blameless?” The next clause then has Job answering that he does not know. But through the last section Job has been proclaiming his innocence. The other way of interpreting these verses is to follow NIV and make all of them hypothetical (“If I were blameless, he would pronounce me guilty”) and then come to this verse with Job saying, “I am blameless.” The second clause of this verse does not fit either view very well. In vv. <data ref="Bible:Job 9:20">20data>, <data ref="Bible:Job 9:21">21data>, and <data ref="Bible:Job 9:22">22data> Job employs the same term forblameless” (<span class="hebrew">תָּםspan>, <span class="translit">tamspan>) as in the prologue (<data ref="Bible:Job 1:1">1:1data>). God used it to describe Job in <data ref="Bible:Job 1:8">1:8data> and <data ref="Bible:Job 2:3">2:3data>. Bildad used it in <data ref="Bible:Job 8:20">8:20data>. These are the final occurrences in the book.

(0.13)(Exo 34:6)

tn Here is one of the clearest examples of what it meansto call on the name of the Lord,” as that clause has been translated traditionally (<span class="hebrew">וַיִּקְרָא בְשֵׁם יְהוָהspan>, <span class="translit">vayyiqraʾ v<sup>esup>shem y<sup>esup>hvahspan>). It seems more likely that it meansto make proclamation of Yahweh by name.” Yahweh came down and made a proclamationand the next verses give the content of what he said. This cannot be prayer or praise; it is a proclamation of the nature or attributes of God (which is what hisnamemeans throughout the Bible). Attempts to make Moses the subject of the verb are awkward, for the verb is repeated in v. <data ref="Bible:Ex 34:6">6data> with Yahweh clearly doing the proclaiming.

(0.13)(Gen 49:10)

sn Cazelles, “Shiloh,” 248, notes that the translation followed here is reflected in the Samaritan Pentateuch; the LXX; the versions of Aquila, Symmachus, and Theodotian; the Targums, and the Syriac Peshitta. Allen P. Ross, <i>Creation and Blesssingi>, 703, gives the Targum Onkelos as saying: “Until the Messiah comes, whose is the kingdom, and him shall the nations obey.” Victor P. Hamilton, <i>The Book of Genesisi> (NICOT), 2:660, adds that <i>Patriarchal Blessingsi> (4QPBless) shows that the Qumran community interpreted <data ref="Bible:Ge 49:10">Gen 49:10data> in a messianic way. C. F. Keil and F. Delitzsch, <i>The Pentateuchi> (Commentary on the Old Testament), 1:397, state thatthe entire Jewish synagogue and the whole Christian Churchwere inperfect agreementthat the patriarch washere proclaiming the coming of the Messsiah.”

(0.10)(1Jo 1:5)

tn The word <span class="greek">ἀγγελίαspan> (<span class="translit">angeliaspan>) occurs only twice in the NT, here and in <data ref="Bible:1Jn 3:11">1 John 3:11data>. It is a cognate of <span class="greek">ἐπαγγελίαspan> (<span class="translit">epangeliaspan>) which occurs much more frequently (some 52 times in the NT) including <data ref="Bible:1Jn 2:25">1 John 2:25data>. BDAG 8 s.v. <span class="greek">ἀγγελίαspan> 1 offers the meaningmessagewhich suggests some overlap with the semantic range of <span class="greek">λόγοςspan> (<span class="translit">logosspan>), although in the specific context of <data ref="Bible:1Jn 1:5">1:5data> BDAG suggests a reference to the gospel. (The precisecontentof thisgood newsis given by the <span class="greek">ὅτιspan> [<span class="translit">hotispan>] clause which follows in <data ref="Bible:1Jn 1:5">1:5bdata>.) The word <span class="greek">ἀγγελίαspan> here is closely equivalent to <span class="greek">εὐαγγέλιονspan> (<span class="translit">euangelionspan>): (1) it refers to the proclamation of the eyewitness testimony about the life and ministry of Jesus Christ as proclaimed by the author and the rest of the apostolic witnesses (prologue, esp. <data ref="Bible:1Jn 1:3-4">1:3-4data>), and (2) it relates to the salvation of the hearers/readers, since the purpose of this proclamation is to bring them into fellowship with God and with the apostolic witnesses (<data ref="Bible:1Jn 1:3">1:3data>). Because of this the adjectivegospelis included in the English translation.

(0.10)(Jon 1:2)

tn <i>Hebi> “cry out against it.” The basic meaning of <span class="hebrew">קָרָאspan> (<span class="translit">qaraʾspan>) isto call out; to cry out; to shout out,” but here it is a technical term referring to what a prophet has to say: “to announce” (e.g., <data ref="Bible:1Ki 13:32">1 Kgs 13:32data>; <data ref="Bible:Is 40:2">Isa 40:2data>, <data ref="Bible:Is 40:6">6data>; <data ref="Bible:Je 3:12">Jer 3:12data>; see <i>HALOTi> 1129 s.v. <span class="hebrew">קראspan> 8). When used with the preposition <span class="hebrew">עַלspan> (<span class="translit">ʿalspan>, “against” [in a hostile sense]; 826 s.v. <span class="hebrew">עַלspan> 5.a), it refers to an oracle announcing or threatening judgment (e.g., <data ref="Bible:1Ki 13:2">1 Kgs 13:2data>, <data ref="Bible:1Ki 13:4">4data>, <data ref="Bible:1Ki 13:32">32data>; BDB 895 s.v. <span class="hebrew">עַלspan> 3.a). This nuance is reflected in several English versions: “Announce my judgment against it” (NLT) andproclaim judgment upon it” (JPS, NJPS). Other translations are less precise: “cry out against it” (KJV, NKJV, ASV, NASB, RSV, NRSV) anddenounce it” (NEB, REB). Some are even misleading: “preach against it” (NAB, NIV) andpreach in it” (Douay). <i>Tgi>. <data ref="Bible:Jon 1:2">Jonah 1:2data> nuances this interpretively asprophesy against.”

(0.10)(Exo 19:6)

tn The constructiona kingdom of priestsmeans that the kingdom is made up of priests. W. C. Kaiser (“Exodus,” <i>EBCi> 2:417) offers four possible renderings of the expression: 1) apposition, viz., “kings, that is, priests”; 2) as a construct with a genitive of specification, “royal priesthood”; 3) as a construct with the genitive being the attribute, “priestly kingdom”; and 4) reading with an unexpressedand”—“kings and priests.” He takes the latter view that they were to be kings and priests. (Other references are R. B. Y. Scott, “A Kingdom of Priests (Exodus xix. 6),” <i>OTSi> 8 [1950]: 213-19; William L. Moran, “A Kingdom of Priests,” <i>The Bible in Current Catholic Thoughti>, 7-20). However, due to the parallelism of the next description which uses an adjective, this is probably a construct relationship. This kingdom of God will be composed of a priestly people. All the Israelites would be living wholly in Gods service and enjoying the right of access to him. And, as priests, they would have the duty of representing God to the nations, following what they perceived to be the duties of priestsproclaiming Gods word, interceding for people, and making provision for people to find God through atonement (see <data ref="Bible:De 33:9">Deut 33:9data>, <data ref="Bible:De 33:10">10data>).