Internet Verse Search Commentaries Word Analysis ITL - draft

The Song of Songs 3:9

Context
NET ©

King Solomon made a sedan chair 1  for himself of wood imported from Lebanon. 2 

NIV ©

King Solomon made for himself the carriage; he made it of wood from Lebanon.

NASB ©

"King Solomon has made for himself a sedan chair From the timber of Lebanon.

NLT ©

"King Solomon has built a carriage for himself from wood imported from Lebanon’s forests.

MSG ©

King Solomon once had a carriage built from fine-grained Lebanon cedar.

BBE ©

King Solomon made himself a bed of the wood of Lebanon.

NRSV ©

King Solomon made himself a palanquin from the wood of Lebanon.

NKJV ©

Of the wood of Lebanon Solomon the King Made himself a palanquin:


KJV
King
<04428>
Solomon
<08010>
made
<06213> (8804)
himself a chariot
<0668>
of the wood
<06086>
of Lebanon
<03844>_.
{a chariot: or, a bed}
NASB ©
"King
<04428>
Solomon
<08010>
has made
<06213>
for himself a sedan
<0668>
chair
<0668>
From the timber
<06086>
of Lebanon
<03844>
.
HEBREW
Nwnblh
<03844>
yuem
<06086>
hmls
<08010>
Klmh
<04428>
wl
<0>
hve
<06213>
Nwyrpa (3:9)
<0668>
LXXM
foreion {N-NSN} epoihsen
<4160
V-AAI-3S
eautw
<1438
D-DSM
o
<3588
T-NSM
basileuv
<935
N-NSM
salwmwn {N-PRI} apo
<575
PREP
xulwn
<3586
N-GPN
tou
<3588
T-GSM
libanou
<3030
N-GSM
NET © [draft] ITL
King
<04428>
Solomon
<08010>
made
<06213>
a sedan
<0668>
chair for himself of wood
<06086>
imported from Lebanon
<03844>
.
NET ©

King Solomon made a sedan chair 1  for himself of wood imported from Lebanon. 2 

NET © Notes

tn The term אַפִּרְיוֹן (’affiryon) is a hapax legomenon variously rendered “sedan-chair” (HALOT 80 s.v. אַפִּרְיוֹן) and “sedan, litter, palanquin” (BDB 68 s.v. אַפִּרְיוֹן). It occurs in Mishnaic Hebrew אַפִּרְיוֹן and Judean Aramaic אַפִּרְיוֹנָא (’affiryona’, “bridal-litter”; Jastrow 108 s.v. אַפִּרְיוֹן) and Syriac pwrywn/purya (“litter”). The Mishnah used אַפִּרְיוֹן in reference to a bridal-litter: “In the last war it was decreed that a bride should not pass through the town in an אַפִּרְיוֹן but our Rabbis later sanctioned it” (Sotah 9:14). There are several views of the origin of the term: (1) LXX Greek φορεῖον (foreion, “bridal-litter”) is a loanword from Hebrew; the term is not used in Greek until the Koine period (LSJ 1950-51); (2) Sanskrit paryanka and palki “palanquin, sedan-chair” (M. Monier-Williams, Sanskrit-English Dictionary, 554); (3) Old Persian upariyana “litter-bed” (R. Gordis, “A Wedding Song for Solomon,” JBL 63 [1944]: 263-70; G. Widengren, Sakrales Königtum im Alten Testament und im Judentum, 122); (4) less likely is Ugaritic apn “two-wheeled cart” (UT 305); and (5) Egyptian pr “house” with the prefix ua and suffix yn meaning “palace” (G. Gerleman, “Die Bildsprache des Hohenliedes und die altegyptische Kunst,” ASTI 1 [1962]: 24-30). A palanquin was a riding vehicle upon which a royal person sat and which was carried by servants who lifted it up by its staffs. Royalty and members of the aristocracy only rode in palanquins. The Illustrated Family Encyclopedia of the Living Bible, 10:55, describes what the typical royal palanquin was made of and looked like in the ancient world: “Only the aristocracy appear to have made use of litters in Israel. At a later period, in Greece, and even more so in Rome, distinguished citizens were carried through the city streets in splendid palanquins. In Egypt the litter was known as early as the third millennium b.c., as is testified by the one belonging to Queen Hetepheres, the mother of the Pharaoh Khufu (Cheops), which was found at Gaza. This litter is made of wood and inlaid in various places with gold decorations. Its total length is 6 ft. 10 in., and the length of the seat inside is 3 ft. 3 in. An inscription on the litter, of gold set in ebony, lists the queen’s titles.”

tn Heb “with trees of Lebanon.” In the genitive construct phrase מֵעֲצֵי הַלְּבָנוֹן (meatse hallÿvanon, “the wood of Lebanon”) the genitive functions as a genitive of place of origin: “wood from Lebanon.” The plural construct noun עֲצֵי (’atse, literally, “trees, woods” from עֵץ, ’ets, “tree, wood”) is a plural of composition: the plural is used to indicate composition, that is, what the sedan-chair was made out of. The plural is used because the sedan-chair was constructed from the wood from several trees or it was constructed from several pieces of wood (see IBHS 119-20 §7.4.1b; R. J. Williams, Hebrew Syntax, 7, §9; Joüon 2:500 §136.b).



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