Internet Verse Search Commentaries Word Analysis ITL - draft

Romans 9:22

Context
NET ©

But what if God, willing to demonstrate his wrath and to make known his power, has endured with much patience the objects 1  of wrath 2  prepared for destruction? 3 

NIV ©

What if God, choosing to show his wrath and make his power known, bore with great patience the objects of his wrath— prepared for destruction?

NASB ©

What if God, although willing to demonstrate His wrath and to make His power known, endured with much patience vessels of wrath prepared for destruction?

NLT ©

God has every right to exercise his judgment and his power, but he also has the right to be very patient with those who are the objects of his judgment and are fit only for destruction.

MSG ©

If God needs one style of pottery especially designed to show his angry displeasure

BBE ©

What if God, desiring to let his wrath and his power be seen, for a long time put up with the vessels of wrath which were ready for destruction:

NRSV ©

What if God, desiring to show his wrath and to make known his power, has endured with much patience the objects of wrath that are made for destruction;

NKJV ©

What if God, wanting to show His wrath and to make His power known, endured with much longsuffering the vessels of wrath prepared for destruction,


KJV
[What] if
<1487> <1161>
God
<2316>_,
willing
<2309> (5723)
to shew
<1731> (5670)
[his] wrath
<3709>_,
and
<2532>
to make
<1107> (0)
his
<846>
power
<1415>
known
<1107> (5658)_,
endured
<5342> (5656)
with
<1722>
much
<4183>
longsuffering
<3115>
the vessels
<4632>
of wrath
<3709>
fitted
<2675> (5772)
to
<1519>
destruction
<684>_:
{fitted: or, made up}
NASB ©
What
<1161>
if
<1487>
God
<2316>
, although willing
<2309>
to demonstrate
<1731>
His wrath
<3709>
and to make
<1107>
His power
<1415>
known
<1107>
, endured
<5342>
with much
<4183>
patience
<3115>
vessels
<4632>
of wrath
<3709>
prepared
<2675>
for destruction
<684>
?
GREEK
ei
<1487>
COND
de
<1161>
CONJ
yelwn
<2309> (5723)
V-PAP-NSM
o
<3588>
T-NSM
yeov
<2316>
N-NSM
endeixasyai
<1731> (5670)
V-AMN
thn
<3588>
T-ASF
orghn
<3709>
N-ASF
kai
<2532>
CONJ
gnwrisai
<1107> (5658)
V-AAN
to
<3588>
T-ASN
dunaton
<1415>
A-ASN
autou
<846>
P-GSM
hnegken
<5342> (5656)
V-AAI-3S
en
<1722>
PREP
pollh
<4183>
A-DSF
makroyumia
<3115>
N-DSF
skeuh
<4632>
N-APN
orghv
<3709>
N-GSF
kathrtismena
<2675> (5772)
V-RPP-APN
eiv
<1519>
PREP
apwleian
<684>
N-ASF
NET © [draft] ITL
But
<1161>
what if
<1487>
God
<2316>
, willing
<2309>
to demonstrate
<1731>
his wrath
<3709>
and
<2532>
to make known
<1107>
his
<846>
power
<1415>
, has endured
<5342>
with
<1722>
much
<4183>
patience
<3115>
the objects
<4632>
of wrath
<3709>
prepared
<2675>
for
<1519>
destruction
<684>
?
NET ©

But what if God, willing to demonstrate his wrath and to make known his power, has endured with much patience the objects 1  of wrath 2  prepared for destruction? 3 

NET © Notes

tn Grk “vessels.” This is the same Greek word used in v. 21.

tn Or “vessels destined for wrath.” The genitive ὀργῆς (orghs) could be taken as a genitive of destination.

tn Or possibly “objects of wrath that have fit themselves for destruction.” The form of the participle could be taken either as a passive or middle (reflexive). ExSyn 417-18 argues strongly for the passive sense (which is followed in the translation), stating that “the middle view has little to commend it.” First, καταρτίζω (katartizw) is nowhere else used in the NT as a direct or reflexive middle (a usage which, in any event, is quite rare in the NT). Second, the lexical force of this verb, coupled with the perfect tense, suggests something of a “done deal” (against some commentaries that see these vessels as ready for destruction yet still able to avert disaster). Third, the potter-clay motif seems to have one point: The potter prepares the clay.



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