Internet Verse Search Commentaries Word Analysis ITL - draft

John 20:31

Context
NET ©

But these 1  are recorded 2  so that you may believe 3  that Jesus is the Christ, 4  the Son of God, and that by believing you may have life in his name. 5 

NIV ©

But these are written that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and that by believing you may have life in his name.

NASB ©

but these have been written so that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God; and that believing you may have life in His name.

NLT ©

But these are written so that you may believe that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God, and that by believing in him you will have life.

MSG ©

These are written down so you will believe that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God, and in the act of believing, have real and eternal life in the way he personally revealed it.

BBE ©

But these are recorded, so that you may have faith that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and so that, having this faith you may have life in his name.

NRSV ©

But these are written so that you may come to believe that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God, and that through believing you may have life in his name.

NKJV ©

but these are written that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and that believing you may have life in His name.


KJV
But
<1161>
these
<5023>
are written
<1125> (5769)_,
that
<2443>
ye might believe
<4100> (5661)
that
<3754>
Jesus
<2424>
is
<2076> (5748)
the Christ
<5547>_,
the Son
<5207>
of God
<2316>_;
and
<2532>
that
<2443>
believing
<4100> (5723)
ye might have
<2192> (5725)
life
<2222>
through
<1722>
his
<846>
name
<3686>_.
NASB ©
but these
<3778>
have been written
<1125>
so
<2443>
that you may believe
<4100>
that Jesus
<2424>
is the Christ
<5547>
, the Son
<5207>
of God
<2316>
; and that believing
<4100>
you may have
<2192>
life
<2222>
in His name
<3686>
.
GREEK
tauta
<5023>
D-NPN
de
<1161>
CONJ
gegraptai
<1125> (5769)
V-RPI-3S
ina
<2443>
CONJ
pisteuhte
<4100> (5725)
V-PAS-2P
oti
<3754>
CONJ
ihsouv
<2424>
N-NSM
estin
<1510> (5748)
V-PXI-3S
o
<3588>
T-NSM
cristov
<5547>
N-NSM
o
<3588>
T-NSM
uiov
<5207>
N-NSM
tou
<3588>
T-GSM
yeou
<2316>
N-GSM
kai
<2532>
CONJ
ina
<2443>
CONJ
pisteuontev
<4100> (5723)
V-PAP-NPM
zwhn
<2222>
N-ASF
echte
<2192> (5725)
V-PAS-2P
en
<1722>
PREP
tw
<3588>
T-DSN
onomati
<3686>
N-DSN
autou
<846>
P-GSM
NET © [draft] ITL
But
<1161>
these
<5023>
are recorded
<1125>
so that
<2443>
you may believe
<4100>
that
<3754>
Jesus
<2424>
is
<1510>
the Christ
<5547>
, the Son
<5207>
of God
<2316>
, and
<2532>
that
<2443>
by believing
<4100>
you may have
<2192>
life
<2222>
in
<1722>
his
<846>
name
<3686>
.
NET ©

But these 1  are recorded 2  so that you may believe 3  that Jesus is the Christ, 4  the Son of God, and that by believing you may have life in his name. 5 

NET © Notes

tn Grk “these things.”

tn Grk “are written.”

tc ‡ A difficult textual variant is present at this point in the Greek text. Some mss (Ì66vid א* B Θ 0250 pc) read the present subjunctive πιστεύητε (pisteuhte) after ἵνα (Jina; thus NEB text, “that you may hold the faith”) while others (א2 A C D L W Ψ Ë1,13 33 Ï) read the aorist subjunctive πιστεύσητε (pisteushte) after ἵνα (cf. NEB margin, “that you may come to believe”). As reflected by the renderings of the NEB text and margin, it is often assumed that the present tense would suggest ongoing belief (i.e., the Fourth Gospel primarily addressed those who already believed, and was intended to strengthen their faith), while the aorist tense would speak of coming to faith (i.e., John’s Gospel was primarily evangelistic in nature). Both textual variants enjoy significant ms support, although the present subjunctive has somewhat superior witnesses on its behalf. On internal grounds it is hard to decide which is more likely the original. Many resolve this issue on the basis of a reconstruction of the overall purpose of the Gospel, viz., whether it is addressed to unbelievers or believers. However, since elsewhere in the Gospel of John (1) the present tense can refer to both initial faith and continuation in the faith and (2) the aorist tense simply refrains from commenting on the issue, it is highly unlikely that the distinction here would be determinative for the purpose of the Fourth Gospel. The question of purpose cannot be resolved by choosing one textual variant over the other in 20:31, but must be decided on other factors. Nevertheless, if a choice has to be made, the present subjunctive is the preferred reading. NA27 puts the aorist’s sigma in brackets, thus representing both readings virtually equally (so TCGNT 220).

tn Or “Jesus is the Messiah” (Both Greek “Christ” and Hebrew and Aramaic “Messiah” mean “one who has been anointed”).

sn See the note on Christ in 1:20.

sn John 20:31. A major question concerning this verse, the purpose statement of the Gospel of John, is whether the author is writing primarily for an audience of unbelievers, with purely evangelistic emphasis, or whether he envisions an audience of believers, whom he wants to strengthen in their faith. Several points are important in this discussion: (1) in the immediate context (20:30), the other signs spoken of by the author were performed in the presence of disciples; (2) in the case of the first of the signs, at Cana, the author makes a point of the effect the miracle had on the disciples (2:11); (3) if the primary thrust of the Gospel is toward unbelievers, it is difficult to see why so much material in chaps. 13-17 (the last meal and Farewell Discourse, concluding with Jesus’ prayer for the disciples), which deals almost exclusively with the disciples, is included; (4) the disciples themselves were repeatedly said to have believed in Jesus throughout the Gospel, beginning with 2:11, yet they still needed to believe after the resurrection (if Thomas’ experience in 20:27-28 is any indication); and (5) the Gospel appears to be written with the assumption that the readers are familiar with the basic story (or perhaps with one or more of the synoptic gospel accounts, although this is less clear). Thus no account of the birth of Jesus is given at all, and although he is identified as being from Nazareth, the words of the Pharisees and chief priests to Nicodemus (7:52) are almost certainly to be taken as ironic, assuming the reader knows where Jesus was really from. Likewise, when Mary is identified in 11:2 as the one who anointed Jesus’ feet with oil, it is apparently assumed that the readers are familiar with the story, since the incident involved is not mentioned in the Fourth Gospel until 12:3. These observations must be set over against the clear statement of purpose in the present verse, 20:31, which seems to have significant evangelistic emphasis. In addition to this there is the repeated emphasis on witness throughout the Fourth Gospel (cf. the witness of John the Baptist in 1:7, 8, 15, 32, and 34, along with 5:33; the Samaritan woman in 4:39; Jesus’ own witness, along with that of the Father who sent him, in 8:14, 18, and 18:37; the disciples themselves in 15:27; and finally the testimony of the author himself in 19:35 and 21:24). In light of all this evidence it seems best to say that the author wrote with a dual purpose: (1) to witness to unbelievers concerning Jesus, in order that they come to believe in him and have eternal life; and (2) to strengthen the faith of believers, by deepening and expanding their understanding of who Jesus is.



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