Internet Verse Search Commentaries Word Analysis ITL - draft

John 19:1

Context
NET ©

Then Pilate took Jesus and had him flogged severely. 1 

NIV ©

Then Pilate took Jesus and had him flogged.

NASB ©

Pilate then took Jesus and scourged Him.

NLT ©

Then Pilate had Jesus flogged with a lead–tipped whip.

MSG ©

So Pilate took Jesus and had him whipped.

BBE ©

Then Pilate took Jesus and had him whipped with cords.

NRSV ©

Then Pilate took Jesus and had him flogged.

NKJV ©

So then Pilate took Jesus and scourged Him .


KJV
Then
<5119>
Pilate
<4091>
therefore
<3767>
took
<2983> (5627)
Jesus
<2424>_,
and
<2532>
scourged
<3146> (5656)
[him].
NASB ©
Pilate
<4091>
then
<3767>
took
<2983>
Jesus
<2424>
and scourged
<3146>
Him.
GREEK
tote
<5119>
ADV
oun
<3767>
CONJ
elaben
<2983> (5627)
V-2AAI-3S
o
<3588>
T-NSM
pilatov
<4091>
N-NSM
ton
<3588>
T-ASM
ihsoun
<2424>
N-ASM
kai
<2532>
CONJ
emastigwsen
<3146> (5656)
V-AAI-3S
NET © [draft] ITL
Then
<5119>
Pilate
<4091>
took
<2983>
Jesus
<2424>
and
<2532>
had him flogged severely
<3146>
.
NET ©

Then Pilate took Jesus and had him flogged severely. 1 

NET © Notes

tn Or “had him flogged,” or (traditional), “scourged him.” The verb should be read as causative. Pilate ordered Jesus to be flogged. A Roman governor would not carry out such a sentence in person. BDAG 620 s.v. μαστιγόω 1. states, “If J refers to the ‘verberatio’ given those condemned to death (TMommsen, Röm. Strafrecht 1899, 938f; Jos., Bell. 2, 308; 5, 449), it is odd that Pilate subsequently claims no cause for action (vs. 6); but if the latter statement refers only to the penalty of crucifixion, μ. vs. 1 may be equivalent to παιδεύω (q.v. 2bγ) in Lk 23:16, 22 (for μ. of a non-capital offense PFlor I, 61, 61 [85ad]=Mitt-Wilck. II/2, 80 II, 61).”

sn This severe flogging was not administered by Pilate himself but his officers, who took Jesus at Pilate’s order and scourged him. The author’s choice of wording here may constitute an allusion to Isa 50:6, “I gave my back to those who scourge me.” Three forms of corporal punishment were employed by the Romans, in increasing degree of severity: (1) fustigatio (beating), (2) flagellatio (flogging), and (3) verberatio (severe flogging, scourging). The first could be on occasion a punishment in itself, but the more severe forms were part of the capital sentence as a prelude to crucifixion. The most severe, verberatio, is what is indicated here by the Greek verb translated flogged severely (μαστιγόω, mastigow). People died on occasion while being flogged this way; frequently it was severe enough to rip a person’s body open or cut muscle and sinew to the bone. It was carried out with a whip that had fragments of bone or pieces of metal bound into the tips.



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