Internet Verse Search Commentaries Word Analysis ITL - draft

Job 26:10

Context
NET ©

He marks out the horizon 1  on the surface of the waters as a boundary between light and darkness.

NIV ©

He marks out the horizon on the face of the waters for a boundary between light and darkness.

NASB ©

"He has inscribed a circle on the surface of the waters At the boundary of light and darkness.

NLT ©

He created the horizon when he separated the waters; he set the boundaries for day and night.

MSG ©

He draws the horizon out over the ocean, sets a boundary between light and darkness.

BBE ©

By him a circle is marked out on the face of the waters, to the limits of the light and the dark.

NRSV ©

He has described a circle on the face of the waters, at the boundary between light and darkness.

NKJV ©

He drew a circular horizon on the face of the waters, At the boundary of light and darkness.


KJV
He hath compassed
<02328> (8804)
the waters
<06440> <04325>
with bounds
<02706>_,
until the day
<0216>
and night
<02822>
come to an end
<08503>_.
{until...: Heb. until the end of light with darkness}
NASB ©
"He has inscribed
<02328>
a circle
<02328>
on the surface
<06440>
of the waters
<04325>
At the boundary
<08503>
of light
<0216>
and darkness
<02822>
.
HEBREW
Ksx
<02822>
Me
<05973>
rwa
<0216>
tylkt
<08503>
de
<05704>
Mym
<04325>
ynp
<06440>
le
<05921>
gx
<02328>
qx (26:10)
<02706>
LXXM
prostagma {N-ASN} egurwsen {V-AAI-3S} epi
<1909
PREP
proswpon
<4383
N-ASN
udatov
<5204
N-GSN
mecri
<3360
PREP
sunteleiav
<4930
N-GSF
fwtov
<5457
N-GSN
meta
<3326
PREP
skotouv
<4655
N-GSN
NET © [draft] ITL
He marks out
<02328>
the horizon
<02706>
on
<05921>
the surface
<06440>
of the waters
<04325>
as
<05704>
a boundary
<08503>
between
<05973>
light
<0216>
and darkness
<02822>
.
NET ©

He marks out the horizon 1  on the surface of the waters as a boundary between light and darkness.

NET © Notes

tn The expression חֹק־חָג (khoq-khag) means “he has drawn a limit as a circle.” According to some the form should have been חָק־חוּג (khaq-khug, “He has traced a circle”). But others argues that the text is acceptable as is, and can be interpreted as “a limit he has circled.” The Hebrew verbal roots are חָקַק (khaqaq, “to engrave; to sketch out; to trace”) and חוּג (khug, “describe a circle”) respectively.



TIP #08: Use the Strong Number links to learn about the original Hebrew and Greek text. [ALL]
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