Internet Verse Search Commentaries Word Analysis ITL - draft

Genesis 4:1

Context
NET ©

Now 1  the man had marital relations with 2  his wife Eve, and she became pregnant 3  and gave birth to Cain. Then she said, “I have created 4  a man just as the Lord did!” 5 

NIV ©

Adam lay with his wife Eve, and she became pregnant and gave birth to Cain. She said, "With the help of the LORD I have brought forth a man."

NASB ©

Now the man had relations with his wife Eve, and she conceived and gave birth to Cain, and she said, "I have gotten a manchild with the help of the LORD."

NLT ©

Now Adam slept with his wife, Eve, and she became pregnant. When the time came, she gave birth to Cain, and she said, "With the LORD’s help, I have brought forth a man!"

MSG ©

Adam slept with Eve his wife. She conceived and had Cain. She said, "I've gotten a man, with GOD's help!"

BBE ©

And the man had connection with Eve his wife, and she became with child and gave birth to Cain, and said, I have got a man from the Lord.

NRSV ©

Now the man knew his wife Eve, and she conceived and bore Cain, saying, "I have produced a man with the help of the LORD."

NKJV ©

Now Adam knew Eve his wife, and she conceived and bore Cain, and said, "I have acquired a man from the LORD."


KJV
And Adam
<0120>
knew
<03045> (8804) <0853>
Eve
<02332>
his wife
<0802>_;
and she conceived
<02029> (8799)_,
and bare
<03205> (8799) <0853>
Cain
<07014>_,
and said
<0559> (8799)_,
I have gotten
<07069> (8804)
a man
<0376>
from
<0854>
the LORD
<03068>_.
{Cain: that is, Gotten, or, Acquired}
NASB ©
Now the man
<0120>
had
<03045>
relations
<03045>
with his wife
<0802>
Eve
<02332>
, and she conceived
<02029>
and gave
<03205>
birth
<03205>
to Cain
<07014>
, and she said
<0559>
, "I have gotten
<07069>
a manchild
<0376>
with the help of the LORD
<03068>
."
HEBREW
hwhy
<03068>
ta
<0854>
sya
<0376>
ytynq
<07069>
rmatw
<0559>
Nyq
<07014>
ta
<0853>
dltw
<03205>
rhtw
<02029>
wtsa
<0802>
hwx
<02332>
ta
<0853>
edy
<03045>
Mdahw (4:1)
<0120>
LXXM
adam
<76
N-PRI
de
<1161
PRT
egnw
<1097
V-AAI-3S
euan
<2096
N-PRI
thn
<3588
T-ASF
gunaika
<1135
N-ASF
autou
<846
D-GSM
kai
<2532
CONJ
sullabousa
<4815
V-AAPNS
eteken
<5088
V-AAI-3S
ton
<3588
T-ASM
kain
<2535
N-PRI
kai
<2532
CONJ
eipen {V-AAI-3S} ekthsamhn
<2932
V-AMI-1S
anyrwpon
<444
N-ASM
dia
<1223
PREP
tou
<3588
T-GSM
yeou
<2316
N-GSM
NET © [draft] ITL
Now the man
<0120>
had marital relations
<03045>
with his wife
<0802>
Eve
<02332>
, and she became pregnant
<02029>
and gave birth
<03205>
to Cain
<07014>
. Then she said
<0559>
, “I
<07069>
have created
<07069>
a man
<0376>
just as the Lord
<03068>
did!”
NET ©

Now 1  the man had marital relations with 2  his wife Eve, and she became pregnant 3  and gave birth to Cain. Then she said, “I have created 4  a man just as the Lord did!” 5 

NET © Notes

tn The disjunctive clause (conjunction + subject + verb) introduces a new episode in the ongoing narrative.

tn Heb “the man knew,” a frequent euphemism for sexual relations.

tn Or “she conceived.”

tn Here is another sound play (paronomasia) on a name. The sound of the verb קָנִיתִי (qaniti, “I have created”) reflects the sound of the name Cain in Hebrew (קַיִן, qayin) and gives meaning to it. The saying uses the Qal perfect of קָנָה (qanah). There are two homonymic verbs with this spelling, one meaning “obtain, acquire” and the other meaning “create” (see Gen 14:19, 22; Deut 32:6; Ps 139:13; Prov 8:22). The latter fits this context very well. Eve has created a man.

tn Heb “with the Lord.” The particle אֶת־ (’et) is not the accusative/object sign, but the preposition “with” as the ancient versions attest. Some take the preposition in the sense of “with the help of” (see BDB 85 s.v. אֵת; cf. NEB, NIV, NRSV), while others prefer “along with” in the sense of “like, equally with, in common with” (see Lev 26:39; Isa 45:9; Jer 23:28). Either works well in this context; the latter is reflected in the present translation. Some understand אֶת־ as the accusative/object sign and translate, “I have acquired a man – the Lord.” They suggest that the woman thought (mistakenly) that she had given birth to the incarnate Lord, the Messiah who would bruise the Serpent’s head. This fanciful suggestion is based on a questionable allegorical interpretation of Gen 3:15 (see the note there on the word “heel”).

sn Since Exod 6:3 seems to indicate that the name Yahweh (יְהוָה, yÿhvah, translated Lord) was first revealed to Moses (see also Exod 3:14), it is odd to see it used in quotations in Genesis by people who lived long before Moses. This problem has been resolved in various ways: (1) Source critics propose that Exod 6:3 is part of the “P” (or priestly) tradition, which is at odds with the “J” (or Yahwistic) tradition. (2) Many propose that “name” in Exod 6:3 does not refer to the divine name per se, but to the character suggested by the name. God appeared to the patriarchs primarily in the role of El Shaddai, the giver of fertility, not as Yahweh, the one who fulfills his promises. In this case the patriarchs knew the name Yahweh, but had not experienced the full significance of the name. In this regard it is possible that Exod 6:3b should not be translated as a statement of denial, but as an affirmation followed by a rhetorical question implying that the patriarchs did indeed know God by the name of Yahweh, just as they knew him as El Shaddai. D. A. Garrett, following the lead of F. Andersen, sees Exod 6:2-3 as displaying a paneled A/B parallelism and translates them as follows: (A) “I am Yahweh.” (B) “And I made myself known to Abraham…as El Shaddai.” (A') “And my name is Yahweh”; (B') “Did I not make myself known to them?” (D. A. Garrett, Rethinking Genesis, 21). However, even if one translates the text this way, the Lord’s words do not necessarily mean that he made the name Yahweh known to the fathers. God is simply affirming that he now wants to be called Yahweh (see Exod 3:14-16) and that he revealed himself in prior times as El Shaddai. If we stress the parallelism with B, the implied answer to the concluding question might be: “Yes, you did make yourself known to them – as El Shaddai!” The main point of the verse would be that El Shaddai, the God of the fathers, and the God who has just revealed himself to Moses as Yahweh are one and the same. (3) G. J. Wenham suggests that pre-Mosaic references to Yahweh are the product of the author/editor of Genesis, who wanted to be sure that Yahweh was identified with the God of the fathers. In this regard, note how Yahweh is joined with another divine name or title in Gen 9:26-27; 14:22; 15:2, 8; 24:3, 7, 12, 27, 42, 48; 27:20; 32:9. The angel uses the name Yahweh when instructing Hagar concerning her child’s name, but the actual name (Ishma-el, “El hears”) suggests that El, not Yahweh, originally appeared in the angel’s statement (16:11). In her response to the angel Hagar calls God El, not Yahweh (16:13). In 22:14 Abraham names the place of sacrifice “Yahweh Will Provide” (cf. v. 16), but in v. 8 he declares, “God will provide.” God uses the name Yahweh when speaking to Jacob at Bethel (28:13) and Jacob also uses the name when he awakens from the dream (28:16). Nevertheless he names the place Beth-el (“house of El”). In 31:49 Laban prays, “May Yahweh keep watch,” but in v. 50 he declares, “God is a witness between you and me.” Yahweh’s use of the name in 15:7 and 18:14 may reflect theological idiom, while the use in 18:19 is within a soliloquy. (Other uses of Yahweh in quotations occur in 16:2, 5; 24:31, 35, 40, 42, 44, 48, 50, 51, 56; 26:22, 28-29; 27:7, 27; 29:32-35; 30:24, 30; 49:18. In these cases there is no contextual indication that a different name was originally used.) For a fuller discussion of this proposal, see G. J. Wenham, “The Religion of the Patriarchs,” Essays on the Patriarchal Narratives, 189-93.



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