Internet Verse Search Commentaries Word Analysis ITL - draft

Ecclesiastes 3:11

Context
NET ©

God has made everything fit beautifully 1  in its appropriate time, but 2  he has also placed ignorance 3  in the human heart 4  so that 5  people 6  cannot discover what God has ordained, 7  from the beginning to the end 8  of their lives. 9 

NIV ©

He has made everything beautiful in its time. He has also set eternity in the hearts of men; yet they cannot fathom what God has done from beginning to end.

NASB ©

He has made everything appropriate in its time. He has also set eternity in their heart, yet so that man will not find out the work which God has done from the beginning even to the end.

NLT ©

God has made everything beautiful for its own time. He has planted eternity in the human heart, but even so, people cannot see the whole scope of God’s work from beginning to end.

MSG ©

True, God made everything beautiful in itself and in its time--but he's left us in the dark, so we can never know what God is up to, whether he's coming or going.

BBE ©

He has made everything right in its time; but he has made their hearts without knowledge, so that man is unable to see the works of God, from the first to the last.

NRSV ©

He has made everything suitable for its time; moreover he has put a sense of past and future into their minds, yet they cannot find out what God has done from the beginning to the end.

NKJV ©

He has made everything beautiful in its time. Also He has put eternity in their hearts, except that no one can find out the work that God does from beginning to end.


KJV
He hath made
<06213> (8804)
every [thing] beautiful
<03303>
in his time
<06256>_:
also he hath set
<05414> (8804)
the world
<05769>
in their heart
<03820>_,
so that
<01097>
no man
<0120>
can find out
<04672> (8799)
the work
<04639>
that God
<0430>
maketh
<06213> (8804)
from the beginning
<07218>
to the end
<05490>_.
NASB ©
He has made
<06213>
everything
<03605>
appropriate
<03303>
in its time
<06256>
. He has also
<01571>
set
<05414>
eternity
<05769>
in their heart
<03820>
, yet
<01097>
so
<01097>
that man
<0120>
will not find
<04672>
out the work
<04639>
which
<0834>
God
<0430>
has done
<06213>
from the beginning
<07218>
even to the end
<05490>
.
HEBREW
Pwo
<05490>
dew
<05704>
sarm
<07218>
Myhlah
<0430>
hve
<06213>
rsa
<0834>
hvemh
<04639>
ta
<0853>
Mdah
<0120>
aumy
<04672>
al
<03808>
rsa
<0834>
ylbm
<01097>
Mblb
<03820>
Ntn
<05414>
Mleh
<05769>
ta
<0853>
Mg
<01571>
wteb
<06256>
hpy
<03303>
hve
<06213>
lkh
<03605>
ta (3:11)
<0853>
LXXM
sun
<4862
PREP
ta
<3588
T-APN
panta
<3956
A-APN
epoihsen
<4160
V-AAI-3S
kala
<2570
A-APN
en
<1722
PREP
kairw
<2540
N-DSM
autou
<846
D-GSM
kai
<2532
CONJ
ge
<1065
PRT
sun
<4862
PREP
ton
<3588
T-ASM
aiwna
<165
N-ASM
edwken
<1325
V-AAI-3S
en
<1722
PREP
kardia
<2588
N-DSF
autwn
<846
D-GPM
opwv
<3704
CONJ
mh
<3165
ADV
eurh
<2147
V-AAS-3S
o
<3588
T-NSM
anyrwpov
<444
N-NSM
to
<3588
T-ASN
poihma
<4161
N-ASN
o
<3739
R-ASN
epoihsen
<4160
V-AAI-3S
o
<3588
T-NSM
yeov
<2316
N-NSM
ap
<575
PREP
archv
<746
N-GSF
kai
<2532
CONJ
mecri
<3360
PREP
telouv
<5056
N-GSN
NET © [draft] ITL
God has made
<06213>
everything
<03605>
fit beautifully
<03303>
in its appropriate time
<06256>
, but he has also
<01571>
placed
<05414>
ignorance in the human heart
<03820>
so that
<01097>
people
<0120>
cannot
<03808>
discover
<04672>
what
<04639>
God
<0430>
has ordained
<06213>
, from the beginning
<07218>
to
<05704>
the end
<05490>
of their lives.
NET ©

God has made everything fit beautifully 1  in its appropriate time, but 2  he has also placed ignorance 3  in the human heart 4  so that 5  people 6  cannot discover what God has ordained, 7  from the beginning to the end 8  of their lives. 9 

NET © Notes

sn The Hebrew adjective translated beautifully functions as a metonymy of effect (i.e., to appear beautiful) for cause (i.e., to make it fit): “to fit beautifully.” It is used in parallelism with Qoheleth’s term for evaluation: טוֹב (tov, “good”) in 5:17.

tn The word “but” does not appear in the Hebrew text, but is supplied in the translation for clarity.

tn Heb “darkness”; perhaps “eternity” or “the future.” The meaning of the noun עֹלָם (’olam) is debated. It may mean: (1) “ignorance”; (2) time reference: (a) “eternity” or (b) “the future”; or (3) “knowledge” (less likely). The arguments for these options may be summarized: (1) Most suggest that עֹלָם is the defectively written form of עוֹלָם “duration; eternity” (e.g., Eccl 1:4; 2:16; 3:14; 9:6; 12:5); see BDB 762 s.v. III עוֹלָם 2.k. Within this school of interpretation, there are several varieties: (a) BDB 762 s.v. III עוֹלָם 2.k suggests that here it denotes “age [i.e., duration] of the world,” which is attested in postbiblical Hebrew. The term III עֹלָם “eternity” = “world” (Jastrow 1084 s.v. עָלַם III) is used in this sense in postbiblical Hebrew, mostly in reference to the Messianic age, or the world to come (e.g., Tg. Genesis 9:16; Tg. Onq. Exodus 21:6; Tg. Psalms 61:7). For example, “the world (עֹלָם) shall last six thousand years, and after one thousand years it shall be laid waste” (b. Rosh HaShanah 31a) and “the world (עֹלָם) to come” (b. Sotah 10b). The LXX and the Vulgate took the term in this sense. This approach was also adopted by several English translations: “the world” (KJV, Douay, ASV margin). (b) HALOT 799 s.v. עוֹלָם 5 and THAT 2:242 suggest that the term refers to an indefinite, unending future: “eternity future” or “enduring state referring to past and future” (see also BDB 762 s.v. III עוֹלָם 2.i). In this sense, the noun עֹלָם functions as a metonymy of association: “a sense of eternity,” but not in a philosophical sense (see J. Barr, Biblical Words for Time [SBT], 117, n. 4). This approach is supported by three factors: (i) the recurrence of עוֹלָם (“eternity”) in 3:14, (ii) the temporal qualification of the statement in the parallel clause (“from beginning to end”), and (iii) by the ordinary meaning of the noun as “eternity” (HALOT 798–799 s.v. עוֹלָם). The point would be that God has endowed man with an awareness of the extra-temporal significance of himself and his accomplishments (D. R. Glenn, “Ecclesiastes,” BKCOT, 984). This is the most frequent approach among English versions: “the timeless” (NAB), “eternity” (RSV, MLB, ASV, NASB, NIV, NJPS), “a sense of time past and time future” (NEB), and “a sense of past and future” (NRSV). (3) Other scholars suggest that עוֹלָם simply refers to the indefinite future: “the future,” that is, things to come (e.g., HALOT 799 s.v. עוֹלָם 2; BDB 762 s.v. III עוֹלָם 2.a; THAT 2:241). The plural עֹלָמִים (’olamim, “things to come”) was used in this sense in Eccl 1:10 (e.g., 1 Kgs 8:13 = 2 Chr 6:2; Pss 61:5; 77:8; 145:13; Dan 9:24; cf. HALOT 799 s.v. עוֹלָם 2). The point would simply be that God has not only ordained all the events that will take place in man’s life (3:1-8), but also preoccupies man with the desire to discover what will happen in the future in terms of the orchestration or timing of these events in his life (3:9-11). This fits well with the description of God’s orchestration of human events in their most appropriate time (3:1-10) and the ignorance of man concerning his future (3:11b). Elsewhere, Qoheleth emphasizes that man cannot learn what the future holds in store for him (e.g., 8:7, 17). This approach is only rarely adopted: “the future” (NJPS margin). (2) The second view is that עֹלָם is not defectively written עוֹלָם (“eternity”) but the segholate noun II עֶלֶם (’elem) that means “dark” (literal) or “ignorance; obscurity; secrecy” (figurative). The related noun תַּעֲלֻמָה (taalumah) means “hidden thing; secret,” and the related verb עָלַם (’alam) means “to hide; to conceal” (BDB 761 s.v. I עָלַם; HALOT 834–35 s.v. עלם). This is related to the Ugaritic noun “dark” and the Akkadian verb “to be black; to be dark” (see HALOT 834-35 s.v. עלם). In postbiblical Hebrew the root II עֶלֶם means (i) “secret” and (ii) “forgetfulness” (Jastrow 1084 s.v. עֶלֶם I). Thus the verse would mean that God has “obscured” man’s knowledge so that he cannot discover certain features of God’s program. This approach is adopted by Moffatt which uses the word “mystery.” Similarly, the term may mean “forgetfulness,” that is, God has plagued man with “forgetfulness” so that he cannot understand what God has done from the beginning to the end (e.g., Eccl 1:11). (3) The third view (Delitzsch) is to relate עֹלָם to a cognate Arabic root meaning “knowledge.” The point would be that God has endowed man with “knowledge,” but not enough for man to discover God’s eternal plan. This approach is only rarely adopted: “knowledge” (YLT).

tn Heb “in their heart.” The Hebrew term translated heart functions as a metonymy of association for man’s intellect, emotions, and will (BDB 524–25 s.v. לֵב 3–6, 9). Here, it probably refers to man’s intellectual capacities, as v. 11 suggests.

tn The compound preposition מִבְּלִי (mibbÿli, preposition מִן [min] + negative particle בְּלִי [bÿli]) is used as a conjunction here. Elsewhere, it can express cause: “because there is no [or is not]” (e.g., Deut 9:28; 28:55; Isa 5:13; Ezek 34:5; Lam 1:4; Hos 4:6), consequence: “so that there is no [or is not]” (e.g., Ezek 14:5; Jer 2:15; 9:9-11; Zeph 3:6), or simple negation: “without” (e.g., Job 4:11, 20; 6:6; 24:7-8; 31:19). BDB 115 s.v. בְּלִי 3.c.β suggests the negative consequence: “so that not,” while HALOT 133 s.v. בְּלִי 5 suggests the simple negation: “without the possibility of.”

tn Heb “man.”

tn Heb “the work that God has done.” The phrase אֶת־הַמַּעֲשֶׂה אֲשֶׁר־עָשָׂה (’et-hammaasehasher-asah, “the work which he [i.e., God] has done”) is an internal cognate accusative (direct object and verb are from the same root), used for emphasis (see IBHS 167 §10.2.1g). The repetition of the verb עָשַׂה (“to do”) in 3:11 and 3:14 suggests that this phrase refers to God’s foreordination of all the events and timing of human affairs: God has “made” ( = “foreordained”; עָשַׂה) everything appropriate in his sovereign timing (3:11a), and all that God has “done” ( = “foreordained”; עָשַׂה) will come to pass (3:14). Thus, the verb עָשַׂה functions as a metonymy of effect (i.e., God’s actions) for cause (i.e., God’s sovereign foreordination). The temporal clause “from beginning to end” (3:11) supports this nuance.

tn Traditionally, “what God has done from the beginning to the end.” The temporal clause מֵרֹאשׁ וְעַד־סוֹף (merosh vÿad-sof, “from the beginning to the end”) is traditionally taken in reference to “eternity” (the traditional understanding of הָעֹלָם [haolam] earlier in the verse; see the note on “ignorance”), e.g., KJV, NEB, NAB, ASV, NASB, NIV, RSV, NRSV. However, if הָעֹלָם simply denotes “the future” (e.g., HALOT 799 s.v. עוֹלָם 2; BDB 762 s.v. III עוֹלָם 2.a; THAT 2:241), this temporal clause would refer to the events God has ordained to transpire in an individual’s life, from beginning to end. This approach is adopted by one English version: “but without man ever guessing, from first to last, all the things that God brings to pass” (NJPS). This would fit well in the context begun in 3:1 with the fourteen merisms encompassing man’s life, starting with “a time to be born” (i.e., from the beginning in 3:11) and concluding with “a time to die” (i.e., to the end in 3:11). This approach is also supported by the admonition of 3:12-13, namely, since no one knows what will happen to him in the future days of his life, Qoheleth recommends that man enjoy each day as a gift from God.

tn The phrase “of their lives” does not appear in the Hebrew text, but is supplied in the translation for clarity.



TIP #07: Use the Discovery Box to further explore word(s) and verse(s). [ALL]
created in 0.06 seconds
powered by bible.org