Internet Verse Search Commentaries Word Analysis ITL - draft

The Song of Songs 5:2

Context
NET ©

The Beloved about Her Lover: I was asleep, but my mind 1  was dreaming. 2  Listen! 3  My lover 4  is knocking 5  at the door! 6  The Lover to His Beloved: “Open 7  for me, my sister, my darling, my dove, my flawless one! My head is drenched with dew, my hair with the dampness of the night.”

NIV ©

I slept but my heart was awake. Listen! My lover is knocking: "Open to me, my sister, my darling, my dove, my flawless one. My head is drenched with dew, my hair with the dampness of the night."

NASB ©

"I was asleep but my heart was awake. A voice! My beloved was knocking: ‘Open to me, my sister, my darling, My dove, my perfect one! For my head is drenched with dew, My locks with the damp of the night.’

NLT ©

Young Woman: "One night as I was sleeping, my heart awakened in a dream. I heard the voice of my lover. He was knocking at my bedroom door. ‘Open to me, my darling, my treasure, my lovely dove,’ he said, ‘for I have been out in the night. My head is soaked with dew, my hair with the wetness of the night.’

MSG ©

I was sound asleep, but in my dreams I was wide awake. Oh, listen! It's the sound of my lover knocking, calling! "Let me in, dear companion, dearest friend, my dove, consummate lover! I'm soaked with the dampness of the night, drenched with dew, shivering and cold."

BBE ©

I am sleeping, but my heart is awake; it is the sound of my loved one at the door, saying, Be open to me, my sister, my love, my dove, my very beautiful one; my head is wet with dew, and my hair with the drops of the night.

NRSV ©

I slept, but my heart was awake. Listen! my beloved is knocking. "Open to me, my sister, my love, my dove, my perfect one; for my head is wet with dew, my locks with the drops of the night."

NKJV ©

THE SHULAMITE I sleep, but my heart is awake; It is the voice of my beloved! He knocks, saying , "Open for me, my sister, my love, My dove, my perfect one; For my head is covered with dew, My locks with the drops of the night."


KJV
I sleep
<03463>_,
but my heart
<03820>
waketh
<05782> (8802)_:
[it is] the voice
<06963>
of my beloved
<01730>
that knocketh
<01849> (8802)_,
[saying], Open
<06605> (8798)
to me, my sister
<0269>_,
my love
<07474>_,
my dove
<03123>_,
my undefiled
<08535>_:
for my head
<07218>
is filled
<04390> (8738)
with dew
<02919>_,
[and] my locks
<06977>
with the drops
<07447>
of the night
<03915>_.
NASB ©
"I was asleep
<03463>
but my heart
<03820>
was awake
<05782>
. A voice
<06963>
! My beloved
<01730>
was knocking
<01849>
: 'Open
<06605>
to me, my sister
<0269>
, my darling
<07474>
, My dove
<03123>
, my perfect
<08535>
one
<08535>
! For my head
<07218>
is drenched
<04390>
with dew
<02919>
, My locks
<06977>
with the damp
<07447>
of the night
<03915>
.'
HEBREW
hlyl
<03915>
yoyor
<07447>
ytwuwq
<06977>
lj
<02919>
almn
<04390>
ysars
<07218>
ytmt
<08535>
ytnwy
<03123>
ytyer
<07474>
ytxa
<0269>
yl
<0>
yxtp
<06605>
qpwd
<01849>
ydwd
<01730>
lwq
<06963>
re
<05782>
yblw
<03820>
hnsy
<03462>
yna (5:2)
<0589>
LXXM
egw
<1473
P-NS
kayeudw
<2518
V-PAI-1S
kai
<2532
CONJ
h
<3588
T-NSF
kardia
<2588
N-NSF
mou
<1473
P-GS
agrupnei
<69
V-PAI-3S
fwnh
<5456
N-NSF
adelfidou {N-GSM} mou
<1473
P-GS
krouei
<2925
V-PAI-3S
epi
<1909
PREP
thn
<3588
T-ASF
yuran
<2374
N-ASF
anoixon
<455
V-AAD-2S
moi
<1473
P-DS
adelfh
<79
N-VSF
mou
<1473
P-GS
h
<3588
T-VSF
plhsion
<4139
ADV
mou
<1473
P-GS
peristera
<4058
N-VSF
mou
<1473
P-GS
teleia
<5046
A-VSF
mou
<1473
P-GS
oti
<3754
CONJ
h
<3588
T-NSF
kefalh
<2776
N-NSF
mou
<1473
P-GS
eplhsyh {V-API-3S} drosou {N-GSF} kai
<2532
CONJ
oi
<3588
T-NPM
bostrucoi {N-NPM} mou
<1473
P-GS
qekadwn {N-GPF} nuktov
<3571
N-GSF
NET © [draft] ITL
The Beloved about Her Lover: I
<0589>
was asleep
<03462>
, but my mind
<03820>
was dreaming
<05782>
. Listen
<06963>
! My lover
<01730>
is knocking
<01849>
at the door! The Lover to His Beloved: “Open
<06605>
for me, my sister
<0269>
, my darling
<07474>
, my dove
<03123>
, my flawless
<08535>
one! My head
<07218>
is drenched
<04390>
with dew
<02919>
, my hair
<06977>
with the dampness
<07447>
of the night
<03915>
.”
NET ©

The Beloved about Her Lover: I was asleep, but my mind 1  was dreaming. 2  Listen! 3  My lover 4  is knocking 5  at the door! 6  The Lover to His Beloved: “Open 7  for me, my sister, my darling, my dove, my flawless one! My head is drenched with dew, my hair with the dampness of the night.”

NET © Notes

tn Heb “my heart.” The term לִבִּי (livvi, “my heart”) is a metonymy of association for emotions (e.g., Prov 15:13; Song 3:11) or thoughts (e.g., Ps 90:12; Prov 18:15) or a synecdoche of part for the whole. If this verse is introducing a dream sequence in 5:2-8, this is a metonymy for the Beloved’s thoughts in her dream: “I was sleeping but my mind was dreaming.” If this verse depicts the Beloved beginning to doze off to sleep – only to be awakened by his knocking at her door – then it is a synecdoche of part for the whole: “I was about to fall asleep when I was suddenly awakened.”

tn Heb “but my heart was awake.” Scholars have interpreted 5:2a in two basic ways: (1) The Beloved had been asleep or was just about to fall asleep when she was awakened by the sound of him knocking on the door of her bedroom chambers. The term לִבִּי (livvi, “my heart”) is a synecdoche of part for the whole: “my heart” = “I.” The participle עֵר (’er) functions verbally, describing a past ingressive state: “was awakened.” The line would be rendered: “I was sleeping when I (= my heart) was awakened.” (2) The Beloved was sleeping, but her mind was dreaming (in her dream she heard him knocking on her door). In this case, לִבִּי (“my heart”) is a metonymy of association for the thoughts (e.g., Ps 90:12; Prov 18:15) and emotions (e.g., Prov 15:13; Song 3:11) she experienced during her dream: “my heart” = “my mind.” The participle עֵר functions verbally, describing a past progressive state: “was awake.” The line could be nuanced, “I was asleep, but my mind was dreaming.” Many translations adopt this approach: “I was asleep but my heart waketh” (KJV), “I was asleep but my heart was awake” (NASB, NIV), and “I was asleep, but my heart was wakeful” (NJPS).

sn The noun קוֹל (qol, literally, “sound, noise, voice”) is used as an exclamation: “Listen!” or “Hark!” (e.g., Gen 4:10; Isa 13:4; 40:3; 52:8; Jer 3:21; 4:15; 10:22; 31:51; 50:28; 51:54; Mic 6:9; Zeph 1:14; 2:14; Song 2:8; 5:2) (HALOT 1085 s.v. קוֹל 8b; BDB 877 s.v. קוֹל 1.f; Joüon 2:614 §162.e; GKC 467 §146.b). The term often refers to a loud or unexpected sound that arrests the attention of a character in a narrative. The speaker/writer uses it as a rhetorical device to dramatically portray his/her own startled reaction to an unexpected sound that called his/her attention. The Beloved is startled from her sleep by the unexpected sound of him loudly knocking at her bedroom door late at night.

sn The phrase קוֹל דּוֹדִי (qol dodi, “Listen! My lover …!”) that introduces this scene in 5:2-8 is the exact same phrase used in 2:8 to introduce the courtship section 2:8-11. In 2:8-11, the Beloved was excited about his unexpected arrival; however, in 5:2-8 she is apathetic about his unexpected approach. One should not miss the dramatic contrast between the Beloved’s eagerness to see her lover in 2:8-11 and her apathy about his approach on this evening in 5:2-8. The repetition of קוֹל דּוֹדִי (“Listen! My lover …!”) in 2:8 and 5:2 is designed to draw out the parallels and contrasts between 2:8-11 and 5:2-8.

sn The participle דוֹפֵק (dofeq) connotes present progressive or iterative action. The verb דָּפַק (dafaq, “to knock, pound, beat”) occurs only three times in biblical Hebrew, twice in reference to knocking at a door (Judg 19:22; Song 5:2) and once of beating cattle in order to drive them along (Gen 33:13). The Qal stem depicts the normal action of knocking at a door, while the Hitpael denotes a more intensive pounding, e.g., Qal: “to knock at the door” (Song 5:2) and Hitpael: “to beat violently against the door” (Judg 19:22) (HALOT 229 s.v. דפק; BDB 200 s.v. דָּפַק). The same connotations are seen in Mishnaic Hebrew, e.g., the verbs דָּפַק and דְּפַק (dÿfaq), “to knock at the door” (Jastrow 317 s.v. דָּפַק), and the nouns דּוֹפֵק “door frame (= what someone knocks on), movable tomb stone,” and דּוֹפְקָנִין (dofÿqanin, “knockers”; Jastrow 287 s.v. דּוֹפְקָנִין). The collocation of the verb פתח “to open” a door (HALOT 986-87 s.v. פתח; BDB 835 s.v. פָּתַח) clearly suggests that he is at the Beloved’s bedroom door.

tn The phrase “at the door” does not appear in the Hebrew but is supplied in the translation for clarity.

tn Heb “Open to me!” Alternately, “Let me in!” The imperatival form of פִּתְחִי (pitkhi, to open”) connotes a polite, but earnest request. The verb פָּתַח (patakh) refers to the action of opening various objects, e.g., sack (Gen 42:27), skin bottle (Judg 4:19), hamper (Exod 2:6), pit (Exod 21:33), mouth of a cave (Josh 10:22), grave (Ezek 37:12, 13), city gates (Neh 13:19; Isa 45:1), gate of a land (Nah 3:13), window (2 Kgs 13:17). When used with the accusative דֶּלֶת (delet, “door”), it refers to opening a door (e.g., Judg 3:25; 19:27; 1 Sam 3:15; 2 Kgs 9:3, 10; 2 Chr 29:3; Job 31:32) (HALOT 986-87 s.v. פתח; BDB 835 s.v. פָּתַח). Although the object דֶּלֶת (“door”) is here omitted, a bedroom door is clearly in mind in 5:2, as indicated by the collocated verb דָּפַק (dafaq, “to knock on a door”) in the preceding line. Translators have often rendered this line woodenly: “Open to me!” (KJV, NASB, NIV); however, NJPS nuances it well: “Let me in!”

sn The three-fold repetition of the verb פָּתַח (patakh, “to open”) (Song 5:2, 5, 6) indicates that it is a key word (Leitwort) in this section. While it is clear that the verb describes her action of opening the door of her bedroom chamber in 5:2, some suggest that in 5:5-6 it is used figuratively (hypocatastasis: implied comparison) of the Beloved “opening” her female genitalia for sexual intercourse (but see study notes below).



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