Internet Verse Search Commentaries Word Analysis ITL - draft

The Song of Songs 3:10

Context
NET ©

Its posts were made 1  of silver; 2  its back 3  was made of gold. Its seat was upholstered with purple wool; 4  its interior was inlaid 5  with leather 6  by the maidens 7  of Jerusalem.

NIV ©

Its posts he made of silver, its base of gold. Its seat was upholstered with purple, its interior lovingly inlaid by the daughters of Jerusalem.

NASB ©

"He made its posts of silver, Its back of gold And its seat of purple fabric, With its interior lovingly fitted out By the daughters of Jerusalem.

NLT ©

Its posts are of silver, its canopy is gold, and its seat is upholstered in purple cloth. Its interior was a gift of love from the young women of Jerusalem."

MSG ©

He had it framed with silver and roofed with gold. The cushions were covered with a purple fabric, the interior lined with tooled leather.

BBE ©

He made its pillars of silver, its base of gold, its seat of purple, the middle of it of ebony.

NRSV ©

He made its posts of silver, its back of gold, its seat of purple; its interior was inlaid with love. Daughters of Jerusalem,

NKJV ©

He made its pillars of silver, Its support of gold, Its seat of purple, Its interior paved with love By the daughters of Jerusalem.


KJV
He made
<06213> (8804)
the pillars
<05982>
thereof [of] silver
<03701>_,
the bottom
<07507>
thereof [of] gold
<02091>_,
the covering
<04817>
of it [of] purple
<0713>_,
the midst
<08432>
thereof being paved
<07528> (8803)
[with] love
<0160>_,
for the daughters
<01323>
of Jerusalem
<03389>_.
NASB ©
"He made
<06213>
its posts
<05982>
of silver
<03701>
, Its back
<07507>
of gold
<02091>
And its seat
<04817>
of purple
<0713>
fabric
<0713>
, With its interior
<08432>
lovingly
<0160>
fitted
<07528>
out By the daughters
<01323>
of Jerusalem
<03389>
.
HEBREW
Mlswry
<03389>
twnbm
<01323>
hbha
<0160>
Pwur
<07528>
wkwt
<08432>
Nmgra
<0713>
wbkrm
<04817>
bhz
<02091>
wtdypr
<07507>
Pok
<03701>
hve
<06213>
wydwme (3:10)
<05982>
LXXM
stulouv
<4769
N-APM
autou
<846
D-GSN
epoihsen
<4160
V-AAI-3S
argurion
<694
N-ASN
kai
<2532
CONJ
anakliton {N-ASN} autou
<846
D-GSN
cruseon
<5552
A-ASN
epibasiv {N-NSF} autou
<846
D-GSN
porfura {N-DSF} entov
<1787
PREP
autou
<846
D-GSN
liyostrwton
<3038
A-NSN
agaphn
<26
N-ASF
apo
<575
PREP
yugaterwn
<2364
N-GPF
ierousalhm
<2419
N-PRI
NET © [draft] ITL
Its posts
<05982>
were made
<06213>
of silver
<03701>
; its back
<07507>
was made of gold
<02091>
. Its seat
<04817>
was upholstered with purple
<0713>
wool; its interior
<08432>
was inlaid
<07528>
with leather
<0160>
by the maidens
<01323>
of Jerusalem
<03389>
.
NET ©

Its posts were made 1  of silver; 2  its back 3  was made of gold. Its seat was upholstered with purple wool; 4  its interior was inlaid 5  with leather 6  by the maidens 7  of Jerusalem.

NET © Notes

tn Heb “He made its posts of silver.”

tn The nouns כֶסֶף (kesef, “silver”), זָהָב (zahav, “gold”) and אַרְגָּמָן (’argaman, “purple”) function as genitives of material out of which their respective parts of the palanquin were made: the posts, base, and seat. The elaborate and expensive nature of the procession is emphasized in this description. This litter was constructed with the finest and most expensive materials. The litter itself was made from the very best wood: cedar and cypress from Lebanon. These were the same woods which Solomon used in constructing the temple (1 Kgs 5:13-28). Silver was overlaid over the “posts,” which were either the legs of the litter or the uprights which supported its canopy, and the “back” of the litter was overlaid with gold. The seat was made out of purple material, which was an emblem of royalty and which was used in the tabernacle (Exod 26:1f; 27:16; 28:5-6) and in the temple (2 Chr 3:14). Thus, the litter was made of the very best which Solomon could offer. Such extravagance reflected his love for his Beloved who rode upon it and would be seen upon it by all the Jerusalemites as she came into the city.

tn The noun רְפִידָה (rÿfidah) is a hapax legomenon whose meaning is uncertain. It may be related to the masculine noun רָפַד (rafad, “camping place, station”) referring to a stopping point in the wilderness march of Israel (Exod 17:1, 8; 19:2; Num 33:14); however, what any semantic connection might be is difficult to discern. The versions have translated רְפִידָה variously: LXX ἀνάκλιτον (anakliton, “chair for reclining”), Vulgate reclinatorium (“support, back-rest of a chair”) Peshitta teshwiteh dahba (“golden cover, throne sheathed in gold leaf”). Modern translators have taken three basic approaches: (1) Following the LXX and Vulgate (“support, rest, back of a chair”), BDB suggests “support,” referring to the back or arm of the chair of palanquin (BDB 951 s.v. רָפַד). Several translations take this view, e.g., NRSV: “its back,” NEB/REB: “its headrest,” and NJPS: “its back.” (2) Koehler-Baumgartner suggest “base, foundation of a saddle, litter” (KBL 905). Several translations follow this approach, e.g., KJV: “the bottom,” NASB: “its base” (margin: “its support,” and NIV: “its base.” (3) G. Gerleman suggests the meaning “cover,” as proposed by Peshitta. The first two approaches are more likely than the third. Thus, it probably refers either to (1) the back of the sedan-chair of the palanquin or (2) the foundation/base of the saddle/litter upon which the palanquin rested (HALOT 1276 s.v. רפד).

tn The Hebrew noun אַרְגָּמָן (’argaman, “purple fabric”) is a loanword from Hittite argaman “tribute,” which is reflected in Akkadian argamannu “purple” (also “tribute” under Hittite influence), Ugaritic argmn “tax, purple,” and Aramaic argwn “purple” (HALOT 84 s.v. אַרְגָּמָן). The Hebrew term refers to wool dyed with red purple (BRL2 153; HALOT 84). It is used in reference to purple threads (Exod 35:25; 39:3; Esth 1:9) or purple cloth (Num 4:13; Judg 8:26; Esth 8:15; Prov 31:22; Jer 10:9; Song 3:10). Purple cloth and fabrics were costly (Ezek 27:7, 16) and were commonly worn by kings as a mark of their royal position (Judg 8:26). Thus, this was a sedan-chair fit for a king. KJV and NIV render it simply as “purple,” NASB as “purple fabric,” and NJPS “purple wool.”

tn The participle רָצוּף (ratsuf) probably functions verbally: “Its interior was fitted out with love/lovingly.” Taking it adjectivally would demand that ַאהֲבָה (’ahavah, “love”) function as a predicate nominative and given an unusual metonymical connotation: “Its inlaid interior [was] a [gift of] love.”

tn The accusative noun אַהֲבָה (’ahavah, “love” or “leather”) functions either as an accusative of material out of which the interior was made (“inlaid with leather”) or an accusative of manner describing how the interior was made (“inlaid lovingly,” that is, “inlaid with love”). The term אַהֲבָה is a homonymic noun therefore, there is an interesting little debate whether אַהֲבָה in 3:10 is from the root אַהֲבָה “love” (BDB 13 s.v. אָהֵב; DCH 1:141 s.v. אַהֲבָה) or אהבה “leather” (HALOT 18 s.v. II אַהֲבָה). The homonymic root אַהֲבָה “leather” is related to Arabic `ihab “leather” or “untanned skin.” It probably occurs in Hos 11:4 and may also appear in Song 3:10 (HALOT 18 s.v. II). Traditionally, scholars and translations have rendered this term as “love” or “lovingly.” The reference to the “daughters of Jerusalem” suggests “love” because they had “loved” Solomon (1:4). However, the context describes the materials out of which the palanquin was made (3:9-10) thus, an interior made out of leather would certainly make sense. Perhaps the best solution is to see this as an example of intentional ambiguity in a homonymic wordplay: “Its interior was inlaid with leather // love by the maidens of Jerusalem.” See G. R. Driver, “Supposed Arabisms in the Old Testament,” JBL 55 (1936): 111; S. E. Loewenstamm, Thesaurus of the Language of the Bible, 1:39; D. Grossberg, “Canticles 3:10 in the Light of a Homeric Analogue and Biblical Poetics,” BTB 11 (1981): 75-76.

tn Heb “daughters” (also in the following line).



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