Internet Verse Search Commentaries Word Analysis ITL - draft

The Song of Songs 2:5

Context
NET ©

Sustain 1  me with raisin cakes, 2  refresh me with apples, 3  for I am faint with love. 4  The Double Refrain: Embracing and Adjuration

NIV ©

Strengthen me with raisins, refresh me with apples, for I am faint with love.

NASB ©

"Sustain me with raisin cakes, Refresh me with apples, Because I am lovesick.

NLT ©

Oh, feed me with your love––your ‘raisins’ and your ‘apples’––for I am utterly lovesick!

MSG ©

Oh! Give me something refreshing to eat--and quickly! Apricots, raisins--anything. I'm about to faint with love!

BBE ©

Make me strong with wine-cakes, let me be comforted with apples; I am overcome with love.

NRSV ©

Sustain me with raisins, refresh me with apples; for I am faint with love.

NKJV ©

Sustain me with cakes of raisins, Refresh me with apples, For I am lovesick.


KJV
Stay
<05564> (8761)
me with flagons
<0809>_,
comfort
<07502> (8761)
me with apples
<08598>_:
for I [am] sick
<02470> (8802)
of love
<0160>_.
{comfort...: Heb. straw me with apples}
NASB ©
"Sustain
<05564>
me with raisin
<0809>
cakes
<0809>
, Refresh
<07502>
me with apples
<08598>
, Because
<03588>
I am lovesick
<02470>
<160>.
HEBREW
yna
<0589>
hbha
<0160>
tlwx
<02470>
yk
<03588>
Myxwptb
<08598>
ynwdpr
<07502>
twsysab
<0809>
ynwkmo (2:5)
<05564>
LXXM
sthrisate
<4741
V-AAD-2P
me
<1473
P-AS
en
<1722
PREP
amoraiv {A-DPF} stoibasate {V-AAD-2P} me
<1473
P-AS
en
<1722
PREP
mhloiv {N-DPN} oti
<3754
CONJ
tetrwmenh {V-RPPNS} agaphv
<26
N-GSF
egw
<1473
P-NS
NET © [draft] ITL
Sustain
<05564>
me with raisin cakes
<0809>
, refresh
<07502>
me with apples
<08598>
, for
<03588>
I
<0589>
am faint
<02470>
with love
<0160>
. The Double Refrain: Embracing and Adjuration
NET ©

Sustain 1  me with raisin cakes, 2  refresh me with apples, 3  for I am faint with love. 4  The Double Refrain: Embracing and Adjuration

NET © Notes

tn The imperatives סַמְּכוּנִי (sammÿkhuni, “sustain me”) and רַפְּדוּנִי (rappÿduni, “revive me”) are both plural in address (Piel 2nd person masculine plural imperatives with 1st person common singular suffixes). Thus, some commentators suggest that the woman is speaking to a large audience, perhaps the banquet guests implied in 2:4 or the maidens mentioned in 2:7 (R. Gordis, Song of Songs and Lamentations, 82). However, the Hebrew plural can be used in reference to a single individual when functioning in an intensive sense (IBHS 122 §7.4.3a). Thus, the woman may be speaking to her beloved, as in the rest of 2:3-6, but with intense passion. Similarly, in Sumerian love literature the bride sometimes uses plural verbs in reference to herself or her bridegroom (S. N. Kramer, The Sacred Marriage Rite, 92, 99).

sn The term אֲשִׁישׁוֹת (’ashishot, “raisin cakes,” from אֲשִׁישָׁה, ’ashishah) refers to an expensive delicacy made of dried compressed grapes (HALOT 95 s.v. אֲשִׁישָׁה; BDB 84 s.v. אֲשִׁישָׁה; Jastrow 128 s.v. אֲשִׁישָׁה). Raisin cakes were used as cultic offerings by many ancient Near Easterners, and were especially prominent in ancient Near Eastern fertility rites (e.g., Isa 16:7; Hos 3:1). In ancient Israel they were eaten during festive celebrations, being viewed as enhancing sexual fertility (2 Sam 6:19; 1 Chr 16:3). Scholars regard the “raisin cakes” as (1) literal food viewed as an aphrodisiac to “cure” her love-sickness; (2) a figurative expression (hypocatastasis) for sexual passion or lovemaking; or (3) double entendre referring to the literal food as an aphrodisiac and her desire for lovemaking.

tn Or “apricots.” The term תַּפּוּחִים (tappukhim, “apples,” from תַּפּוּחַ, tappukha) occurs four times in the book (Song 2:3, 5; 7:9; 8:5) and twice outside (Prov 25:4; Joel 1:12). It is usually defined as “apples” (BDB 656 s.v. תַּפּוּחַ); however, some argue for “apricots” (FFB 92-93). The Hebrew noun תַּפּוּחַ (“apple”) is derived from the Hebrew root נָפַח (nafakh, “scent, breath”) which is related to the Arabic root nafahu “fragrant scent” (HALOT 708 s.v. נפח). Hence, the term refers to a fruit with a fragrant scent. This may explain why the mere scent of this fruit was thought to have medicinal powers in the ancient Near East (G. E. Post, Flora of Syria, Palestine and Sinai, 128). This imagery draws upon two motifs associated with apples. First, apples were viewed as medicinal in ancient Syro-Palestinian customs; the sick were given apples to eat or smell in order to revive them. Similarly, the Mishnah and Talmud refer to apples as a medication like wine and grapes. Second, apples were considered an aphrodisiac in the ancient Near East. Both motifs are combined here because the Beloved is “love-sick” and only the embrace of her beloved can cure her, as 2:6 indicates (T. H. Ratzaby, “A Motif in Hebrew Love Poetry: In Praise of the Apple,” Ariel 40 [1976]: 14).

tn Heb “sick of love.” The expression חוֹלַת אַהֲבָה (kholatahavah, “sick of love”) is an example of the causative use of the genitive construct: “I am sick because of love,” that is, “I am love-sick.” The expression חוֹלַת אַהֲבָה (kholatahavah, “faint with love”) is a figure which compares physical or medical illness caused by a physically draining disease to sexual desire which is so intense that a person is so physically drained that they feel as if they could faint. The term חוֹל (khol, “sick”) refers to the physical weakness which consumes a person who is suffering from a medical illness (Gen 48:1; 1 Sam 19:14). It is used figuratively as a hyperbolic hypocatastasis for being so consumed with sexual desire that it saps one of his/her physical and emotional strength (BDB 317 s.v. 2). This is commonly referred to as “love-sickness.” It was associated with such deep longing for physical and sexual fulfillment that it weighed so heavily upon a person that he/she was physically and emotionally drained (2 Sam 13:2).



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