Internet Verse Search Commentaries Word Analysis ITL - draft

The Song of Songs 2:1

Context
NET ©

The Beloved to Her Lover: I am a 1  meadow flower 2  from Sharon, 3  a lily 4  from the valleys.

NIV ©

I am a rose of Sharon, a lily of the valleys.

NASB ©

"I am the rose of Sharon, The lily of the valleys."

NLT ©

Young Woman: "I am the rose of Sharon, the lily of the valley."

MSG ©

I'm just a wildflower picked from the plains of Sharon, a lotus blossom from the valley pools.

BBE ©

I am a rose of Sharon, a flower of the valleys.

NRSV ©

I am a rose of Sharon, a lily of the valleys.

NKJV ©

I am the rose of Sharon, And the lily of the valleys.


KJV
I [am] the rose
<02261>
of Sharon
<08289>_,
[and] the lily
<07799>
of the valleys
<06010>_.
NASB ©
"I am the rose
<02261>
of Sharon
<08289>
, The lily
<07799>
of the valleys
<06010>
."
HEBREW
Myqmeh
<06010>
tnsws
<07799>
Nwrsh
<08289>
tlubx
<02261>
yna (2:1)
<0589>
LXXM
egw
<1473
P-NS
anyov
<438
N-NSN
tou
<3588
T-GSN
pediou {N-GSN} krinon
<2918
N-NSN
twn
<3588
T-GPF
koiladwn {N-GPF}
NET © [draft] ITL
The Beloved to Her Lover: I
<0589>
am a meadow flower
<02261>
from Sharon
<08289>
, a lily
<07799>
from the valleys
<06010>
.
NET ©

The Beloved to Her Lover: I am a 1  meadow flower 2  from Sharon, 3  a lily 4  from the valleys.

NET © Notes

tn Or “the rose of Sharon…the lily of the valleys.” There is debate whether the expressions חֲבַצֶּלֶת הַשָּׁרוֹן (khavatselet hashsharon) and שׁוֹשַׁנַּת הָעֲמָקִים (shoshannat haamaqim) are definite (“the rose of Sharon…the lily of the valleys”) or indefinite (“a rose of Sharon…a lily”). Some translations adopt the definite sense (KJV, NKJV, NASB, NAU, NJB, NLT); others the indefinite sense (ASV, RSV, NRSV, NIV, NIB, NAB, NJPS, CEV).

tn Heb “meadow-saffron” or “crocus.” The noun חֲבַצֶּלֶת (khavatselet) traditionally has been translated “rose” (KJV, NKJV, ASV, NASB, RSV, NRSV, NIV, NJPS, NLT, CEV); however, recent translations suggest “crocus” (NIV margin, NJPS margin), “narcissus” (DBY) or simply “flower” (DRA, NAB). The LXX translated it with the generic term ἀνθος (anqos, “flower, blossom”). Early English translators knew that it referred to some kind of flower but were unsure exactly which type, so they arbitrarily chose “rose” because it was a well-known and beautiful flower. In the light of comparative Semitics, modern Hebrew lexicographers have settled on “asphodel,” “meadow-saffron,” “narcissus,” or “crocus” (BDB 287 s.v. חֲבַצֶּלֶת; HALOT 287 s.v. חֲבַצֶּלֶת; DCH 3:153 s.v. חֲבַצֶּלֶת). The Hebrew term is related to Syriac hamsalaita (“meadow saffron”) and Akkadian habasillatu (“flower-stalk, marsh plant, reed”). Lexicographers and botanists suggest that the Hebrew term refers to Ashodelos (lily family), Narcissus tazetta (narcissus or daffodil), or Colchicum autumnale (meadow-saffron or crocus). The location of this flower in Sharon suggests that a common wild flower would be more consonant than a rose. The term appears elsewhere only in Isa 35:1 where it refers to some kind of desert flower – erroneously translated “rose” (KJV, NJPS) but probably “crocus” (NASB, NIV, NJPS margin). Appropriately, the rustic maiden who grew up in the simplicity of rural life compares herself to a simple, common flower of the field (M. H. Pope, Song of Songs [AB], 367).

sn Sharon is a low coastal plain stretching south from Mount Carmel. It is well watered due to the Kurkar ridges running parallel to the shore which trapped the water run-off from the Samaritan hills. The combination of low sandy hills and swampy lowlands produced heavy vegetation and an abundance of wild flowers in the area (M. H. Pope, Song of Songs [AB], 367).

tn There is debate about the referent of שׁוֹשַׁנָּת (shoshannat, “lily”) because there are many different species of the lily family. Botanists note that among the many different species of the lily family only one grows in Palestine. This species may be identified as the Anthemis palaestina, the chamomile, a white-daisy-like plant, which was indigenous to Palestine (Fauna and Flora of the Bible, 134-36).



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