Internet Verse Search Commentaries Word Analysis ITL - draft

Revelation 3:14

Context
NETBible

“To 1  the angel of the church in Laodicea write the following: 2  “This is the solemn pronouncement of 3  the Amen, the faithful and true witness, the originator 4  of God’s creation:

XREF

Isa 55:4; Isa 65:16; Jer 42:5; 2Co 1:20; Col 1:15; Col 2:1; Col 4:16; Re 1:5; Re 1:11; Re 2:1; Re 3:7; Re 19:11; Re 22:6

NET © Notes

tn Here καί (kai) has not been translated due to differences between Greek and English style.

tn The phrase “the following” after “write” is supplied to clarify that what follows is the content of what is to be written.

tn Grk “These things says [the One]…” See the note on the phrase “this is the solemn pronouncement of” in 2:1.

sn The expression This is the solemn pronouncement of reflects an OT idiom. See the note on this phrase in 2:1.

tn Or “the beginning of God’s creation”; or “the ruler of God’s creation.” From a linguistic standpoint all three meanings for ἀρχή (arch) are possible. The term is well attested in both LXX (Gen 40:13, 21; 41:13) and intertestamental Jewish literature (2 Macc 4:10, 50) as meaning “ruler, authority” (BDAG 138 s.v. 6). Some have connected this passage to Paul’s statements in Col 1:15, 18 which describe Christ as ἀρχή and πρωτότοκος (prwtotoko"; e.g., see R. H. Mounce, Revelation [NICNT], 124) but the term ἀρχή has been understood as either “beginning” or “ruler” in that passage as well. The most compelling connection is to be found in the prologue to John’s Gospel (1:2-4) where the λόγος (logos) is said to be “in the beginning (ἀρχή) with God,” a temporal reference connected with creation, and then v. 3 states that “all things were made through him.” The connection with the original creation suggests the meaning “originator” for ἀρχή here. BDAG 138 s.v. 3 gives the meaning “the first cause” for the word in Rev 3:14, a term that is too philosophical for the general reader, so the translation “originator” was used instead. BDAG also notes, “but the mng. beginning = ‘first created’ is linguistically probable (s. above 1b and Job 40:19; also CBurney, Christ as the ᾿Αρχή of Creation: JTS 27, 1926, 160-77).” Such a meaning is unlikely here, however, since the connections described above are much more probable.



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