Internet Verse Search Commentaries Word Analysis ITL - draft

Psalms 3:7

Context
NET ©

Rise up, 1  Lord! Deliver me, my God! Yes, 2  you will strike 3  all my enemies on the jaw; you will break the teeth 4  of the wicked. 5 

NIV ©

Arise, O LORD! Deliver me, O my God! Strike all my enemies on the jaw; break the teeth of the wicked.

NASB ©

Arise, O LORD; save me, O my God! For You have smitten all my enemies on the cheek; You have shattered the teeth of the wicked.

NLT ©

Arise, O LORD! Rescue me, my God! Slap all my enemies in the face! Shatter the teeth of the wicked!

MSG ©

Up, GOD! My God, help me! Slap their faces, First this cheek, then the other, Your fist hard in their teeth!

BBE ©

Come to me, Lord; keep me safe, O my God; for you have given all my haters blows on their face-bones; the teeth of the evil-doers have been broken by you.

NRSV ©

Rise up, O LORD! Deliver me, O my God! For you strike all my enemies on the cheek; you break the teeth of the wicked.

NKJV ©

Arise, O LORD; Save me, O my God! For You have struck all my enemies on the cheekbone; You have broken the teeth of the ungodly.


KJV
Arise
<06965> (8798)_,
O LORD
<03068>_;
save
<03467> (8685)
me, O my God
<0430>_:
for thou hast smitten
<05221> (8689)
all mine enemies
<0341> (8802)
[upon] the cheek bone
<03895>_;
thou hast broken
<07665> (8765)
the teeth
<08127>
of the ungodly
<07563>_.
NASB ©
Arise
<06965>
, O LORD
<03068>
; save
<03467>
me, O my God
<0430>
! For You have smitten
<05221>
all
<03605>
my enemies
<0340>
on the cheek
<03895>
; You have shattered
<07665>
the teeth
<08127>
of the wicked
<07563>
.
HEBREW
trbs
<07665>
Myesr
<07563>
yns
<08127>
yxl
<03895>
ybya
<0341>
lk
<03605>
ta
<0853>
tykh
<05221>
yk
<03588>
yhla
<0430>
yneyswh
<03467>
hwhy
<03068>
hmwq
<06965>
(3:7)
<3:8>
LXXM
(3:8) anasta
<450
V-AAD-2S
kurie
<2962
N-VSM
swson
<4982
V-AAD-2S
me
<1473
P-AS
o
<3588
T-NSM
yeov
<2316
N-NSM
mou
<1473
P-GS
oti
<3754
CONJ
su
<4771
P-NS
epataxav
<3960
V-AAI-2S
pantav
<3956
A-APM
touv
<3588
T-APM
ecyrainontav {V-AAPAP} moi
<1473
P-DS
mataiwv
<3152
ADV
odontav
<3599
N-APM
amartwlwn
<268
A-GPM
sunetriqav
<4937
V-AAI-2S
NET © [draft] ITL
Rise up
<06965>
, Lord
<03068>
! Deliver
<03467>
me, my God
<0430>
! Yes
<03588>
, you will strike
<05221>
all
<03605>
my enemies
<0341>
on the jaw
<03895>
; you will break
<07665>
the teeth
<08127>
of the wicked
<07563>
.
NET ©

Rise up, 1  Lord! Deliver me, my God! Yes, 2  you will strike 3  all my enemies on the jaw; you will break the teeth 4  of the wicked. 5 

NET © Notes

tn In v. 2 the psalmist describes his enemies as those who “confront” him (קָמִים [qamim], literally, “rise up against him”). Now, using the same verbal root (קוּם, qum) he asks the Lord to rise up (קוּמָה, qumah) in his defense.

tn Elsewhere in the psalms the particle כִּי (ki), when collocated with a perfect verbal form and subordinated to a preceding imperative directed to God, almost always has an explanatory or causal force (“for, because”) and introduces a motivating argument for why God should respond positively to the request (see Pss 5:10; 6:2; 12:1; 16:1; 41:4; 55:9; 56:1; 57:1; 60:2; 69:1; 74:20; 119:94; 123:3; 142:6; 143:8). (On three occasions the כִּי is recitative after a verb of perception [“see/know that,” see Pss 4:3; 25:19; 119:159]). If כִּי is taken as explanatory here, then the psalmist is arguing that God should deliver him now because that is what God characteristically does. However, such a motivating argument is not used in the passages cited above. The motivating argument usually focuses on the nature of the psalmist’s dilemma or the fact that he trusts in the Lord. For this reason it is unlikely that כִּי has its normal force here. Most scholars understand the particle כִּי as having an asseverative (emphasizing) function here (“indeed, yes”; NEB leaves the particle untranslated).

tn If the particle כִּי (ki) is taken as explanatory, then the perfect verbal forms in v. 7b would describe God’s characteristic behavior. However, as pointed out in the preceding note on the word “yes,” the particle probably has an asseverative force here. If so, the perfects may be taken as indicating rhetorically the psalmist’s certitude and confidence that God will intervene. The psalmist is so confident of God’s positive response to his prayer, he can describe God’s assault on his enemies as if it had already happened. Such confidence is consistent with the mood of the psalm, as expressed before (vv. 3-6) and after this (v. 8). Another option is to take the perfects as precative, expressing a wish or request (“Strike all my enemies on the jaw, break the teeth of the wicked”). See IBHS 494-95 §30.5.4c, d. However, not all grammarians are convinced that the perfect is used as a precative in biblical Hebrew.

sn The expression break the teeth may envision violent hand-to hand combat, though it is possible that the enemies are pictured here as a dangerous animal (see Job 29:17).

tn In the psalms the Hebrew term רְשָׁעִים (rÿshaim, “wicked”) describes people who are proud, practical atheists (Ps 10:2, 4, 11) who hate God’s commands, commit sinful deeds, speak lies and slander (Ps 50:16-20), and cheat others (Ps 37:21). They oppose God and his people.



TIP #08: Use the Strong Number links to learn about the original Hebrew and Greek text. [ALL]
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