Proverbs 18:6

NET ©

The lips of a fool enter into strife, and his mouth invites a flogging.

NIV ©

A fool’s lips bring him strife, and his mouth invites a beating.

NASB ©

A fool’s lips bring strife, And his mouth calls for blows.

NLT ©

Fools get into constant quarrels; they are asking for a beating.

MSG ©

The words of a fool start fights; do him a favor and gag him.

BBE ©

A foolish man’s lips are a cause of fighting, and his mouth makes him open to blows.

NRSV ©

A fool’s lips bring strife, and a fool’s mouth invites a flogging.

NKJV ©

A fool’s lips enter into contention, And his mouth calls for blows.

KJV
A fool's
<03684>
lips
<08193>
enter
<0935> (8799)
into contention
<07379>_,
and his mouth
<06310>
calleth
<07121> (8799)
for strokes
<04112>_.
HEBREW
arqy
<07121>
twmlhml
<04112>
wypw
<06310>
byrb
<07379>
waby
<0935>
lyok
<03684>
ytpv (18:6)
<08193>
LXXM
ceilh
<5491>  
N-NPN
afronov
<878>  
A-GSM
agousin
<71>  
V-PAI-3P
auton
<846>  
D-ASM
eiv
<1519>  
PREP
kaka
<2556>  
A-APN
to
<3588>  
T-NSN
de
<1161>  
PRT
stoma
<4750>  
N-NSN
autou
<846>  
D-GSM
to
<3588>  
T-NSN
yrasu
 
A-NSN
yanaton
<2288>  
N-ASM
epikaleitai
 
V-PMI-3S
NET © [draft] ITL
The lips
<08193>
of a fool
<03684>
enter
<0935>
into strife
<07379>
, and his mouth
<06310>
invites
<07121>
a flogging
<04112>
.
NET © Notes

sn The “lips” is a metonymy of cause, meaning what the fool says. The “mouth” in the second colon is likewise a metonymy for speech, what comes out of the mouth.

sn “Strife” is a metonymy of cause, it is the cause of the beating or flogging that follows; “flogging” in the second colon is a metonymy of effect, the flogging is the effect of the strife. The two together give the whole picture.

tn Heb “calls for.” This is personification: What the fool says “calls for” a beating or flogging. The fool deserves punishment, but does not actually request it.

tn Heb “blows.” This would probably be physical beatings, either administered by the father or by society (e.g., also 19:25; Ps 141:5; cf. NAB, NIV, TEV, NLT). Today, however, “a beating” could be associated with violent criminal assault, whereas the context suggests punishment. Therefore “a flogging” is used in the translation, since that term is normally associated with disciplinary action.