Internet Verse Search Commentaries Word Analysis ITL - draft

Philemon 1:12

Context
NET ©

I have sent 1  him (who is my very heart) 2  back to you.

NIV ©

I am sending him—who is my very heart—back to you.

NASB ©

I have sent him back to you in person, that is, sending my very heart,

NLT ©

I am sending him back to you, and with him comes my own heart.

MSG ©

I'm sending him back to you, but it feels like I'm cutting off my right arm in doing so.

BBE ©

Whom I have sent back to you, him who is my very heart:

NRSV ©

I am sending him, that is, my own heart, back to you.

NKJV ©

I am sending him back. You therefore receive him, that is, my own heart,


KJV
Whom
<3739>
I have sent again
<375> (5656)_:
thou
<4771>
therefore
<1161>
receive
<4355> (5640)
him
<846>_,
that is
<5123> (5748)_,
mine own
<1699>
bowels
<4698>_:
NASB ©
I have sent
<375>
him back
<375>
to you in person
<846>
, that is, sending my very heart
<4698>
,
GREEK
on
<3739>
R-ASM
anepemqa
<375> (5656)
V-AAI-1S
soi
<4671>
P-2DS
auton
<846>
P-ASM
tout
<5124>
D-NSN
estin
<1510> (5748)
V-PXI-3S
ta
<3588>
T-NPN
ema
<1699>
S-1NPN
splagcna
<4698>
N-NPN
NET © [draft] ITL
I have sent
<375>
him
<846>
(who
<5124>
is
<1510>
my
<1699>
very heart
<4698>
) back
<375>
to you
<4671>
.
NET ©

I have sent 1  him (who is my very heart) 2  back to you.

NET © Notes

tc There are several variants at this point in the text, most of them involving the addition of προσλαβοῦ (proslabou, “receive, accept”) at various locations in the verse. But all such variants seem to be motivated by the harsh syntax of the verse without this verb. Without the verb, the meaning is that Onesimus is Paul’s “very heart,” though this is an awkward expression especially because of τουτ᾿ ἔστιν (toutestin, “this is, who is”) in the middle cluttering the construction. Nowhere else in the NT is σπλάγχνα (splancna, here translated “heart”) used in apposition to people. It is thus natural that scribes would want to fill out the text here, and they did so apparently with a verb that was ready at hand (borrowed from v. 17). With the verb the sentence is converted into an object-complement construction: “I have sent him back to you; accept him, that is, as my very heart.” But both the fact that some important witnesses (א* A F G 33 pc) lack the verb, and that its location floats in the various constructions that have it, suggest that the original text did not have προσλαβοῦ.

tn Grk “whom I have sent.” The Greek sentence was broken up in the English translation for the sake of clarity. Although the tense of the Greek verb here is past (an aorist tense) the reader should understand that Onesimus may well have been standing in the very presence of Paul as he wrote this letter.

tn That is, “who means a great deal to me”; Grk “whom I have sent to you, him, this one is my heart.”



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