Internet Verse Search Commentaries Word Analysis ITL - draft

Numbers 11:4

Context
NET ©

1 Now the mixed multitude 2  who were among them craved more desirable foods, 3  and so the Israelites wept again 4  and said, “If only we had meat to eat! 5 

NIV ©

The rabble with them began to crave other food, and again the Israelites started wailing and said, "If only we had meat to eat!

NASB ©

The rabble who were among them had greedy desires; and also the sons of Israel wept again and said, "Who will give us meat to eat?

NLT ©

Then the foreign rabble who were traveling with the Israelites began to crave the good things of Egypt, and the people of Israel also began to complain. "Oh, for some meat!" they exclaimed.

MSG ©

The riff-raff among the people had a craving and soon they had the People of Israel whining, "Why can't we have meat?

BBE ©

And the mixed band of people who went with them were overcome by desire: and the children of Israel, weeping again, said, Who will give us flesh for our food?

NRSV ©

The rabble among them had a strong craving; and the Israelites also wept again, and said, "If only we had meat to eat!

NKJV ©

Now the mixed multitude who were among them yielded to intense craving; so the children of Israel also wept again and said: "Who will give us meat to eat?


KJV
And the mixt multitude
<0628>
that [was] among
<07130>
them fell a lusting
<0183> (8694) <08378>_:
and the children
<01121>
of Israel
<03478>
also wept
<01058> (8799)
again
<07725> (8799)_,
and said
<0559> (8799)_,
Who shall give us flesh
<01320>
to eat
<0398> (8686)_?
{fell...: Heb. lusted a lust} {wept...: Heb. returned and wept}
NASB ©
The rabble
<0628>
who
<0834>
were among
<07130>
them had
<0183>
greedy
<08378>
desires
<0183>
<8378>; and also
<01571>
the sons
<01121>
of Israel
<03478>
wept
<01058>
again
<07725>
and said
<0559>
, "Who
<04310>
will give us meat
<01320>
to eat
<0398>
?
HEBREW
rvb
<01320>
wnlkay
<0398>
ym
<04310>
wrmayw
<0559>
larvy
<03478>
ynb
<01121>
Mg
<01571>
wkbyw
<01058>
wbsyw
<07725>
hwat
<08378>
wwath
<0183>
wbrqb
<07130>
rsa
<0834>
Popoahw (11:4)
<0628>
LXXM
kai
<2532
CONJ
o
<3588
T-NSM
epimiktov {A-NSM} o
<3588
T-NSM
en
<1722
PREP
autoiv
<846
D-DPM
epeyumhsan
<1937
V-AAI-3P
epiyumian
<1939
N-ASF
kai
<2532
CONJ
kayisantev
<2523
V-AAPNP
eklaion
<2799
V-IAI-3P
kai
<2532
CONJ
oi
<3588
T-NPM
uioi
<5207
N-NPM
israhl
<2474
N-PRI
kai
<2532
CONJ
eipan {V-AAI-3P} tiv
<5100
I-NSM
hmav
<1473
P-AP
qwmiei
<5595
V-FAI-3S
krea
<2907
N-APN
NET © [draft] ITL
Now the mixed multitude
<0628>
who
<0834>
were among
<07130>
them craved
<0183>
more desirable
<08378>
foods
<01571>
, and so the Israelites
<03478>
wept
<01058>
again
<07725>
and said
<0559>
, “If only
<04310>
we had meat
<01320>
to eat
<0398>
!
NET ©

1 Now the mixed multitude 2  who were among them craved more desirable foods, 3  and so the Israelites wept again 4  and said, “If only we had meat to eat! 5 

NET © Notes

sn The story of the sending of the quail is a good example of poetic justice, or talionic justice. God had provided for the people, but even in that provision they were not satisfied, for they remembered other foods they had in Egypt. No doubt there was not the variety of foods in the Sinai that might have been available in Egypt, but their life had been bitter bondage there as well. They had cried to the Lord for salvation, but now they forget, as they remember things they used to have. God will give them what they crave, but it will not do for them what they desire. For more information on this story, see B. J. Malina, The Palestinian Manna Tradition. For the attempt to explain manna and the other foods by natural phenomena, see F. W. Bodenheimer, “The Manna of Sinai,” BA 10 (1947): 1-6.

tn The mixed multitude (or “rabble,” so NASB, NIV, NRSV; NLT “foreign rabble”) is the translation of an unusual word, הֲָאסַפְסֻף (hasafsuf). It occurs in the Hebrew Bible only here. It may mean “a gathering of people” from the verb אָסַף (’asaf), yielding the idea of a mixed multitude (in line with Exod 12:38). But the root is different, and so no clear connection can be established. Many commentators therefore think the word is stronger, showing contempt through a word that would be equivalent to “riff-raff.”

tn The Hebrew simply uses the cognate accusative, saying “they craved a craving” (הִתְאַוּוּ תַּאֲוָה, hitavvu tavah), but the context shows that they had this strong craving for food. The verb describes a strong desire, which is not always negative (Ps 132:13-14). But the word is a significant one in the Torah; it was used in the garden story for Eve’s desire for the tree, and it is used in the Decalogue in the warning against coveting (Deut 5:21).

tc The Greek and the Latin versions read “and they sat down” for “and they returned,” involving just a change in vocalization (which they did not have). This may reflect the same expression in Judg 20:26. But the change does not improve this verse.

tn The Hebrew text uses a verbal hendiadys here, one word serving as an adverb for the other. It literally reads “and they returned and they wept,” which means they wept again. Here the weeping is put for the complaint, showing how emotionally stirred up the people had become by the craving. The words throughout here are metonymies. The craving is a metonymy of cause, for it would have then led to expressions (otherwise the desires would not have been known). And the weeping is either a metonymy of effect, or of adjunct, for the actual complaints follow.

tn The Hebrew expresses the strong wish or longing idiomatically: “Who will give us flesh to eat?” It is a rhetorical expression not intended to be taken literally, but merely to give expression to the longing they had. See GKC 476 §151.a.1.



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