Micah 2:8

NET ©

but you rise up as an enemy against my people. You steal a robe from a friend, from those who pass by peacefully as if returning from a war.

NIV ©

Lately my people have risen up like an enemy. You strip off the rich robe from those who pass by without a care, like men returning from battle.

NASB ©

"Recently My people have arisen as an enemy— You strip the robe off the garment From unsuspecting passers-by, From those returned from war.

NLT ©

Yet to this very hour my people rise against me! You steal the shirts right off the backs of those who trusted you, making them as ragged as men who have just come home from battle.

MSG ©

"What do you mean, 'good people'! You're the enemy of my people! You rob unsuspecting people out for an evening stroll. You take their coats off their backs like soldiers who plunder the defenseless.

BBE ©

As for you, you have become haters of those who were at peace with you: you take the clothing of those who go by without fear, and make them prisoners of war.

NRSV ©

But you rise up against my people as an enemy; you strip the robe from the peaceful, from those who pass by trustingly with no thought of war.

NKJV ©

"Lately My people have risen up as an enemy––You pull off the robe with the garment From those who trust you , as they pass by, Like men returned from war.

KJV
Even of late
<0865>
my people
<05971>
is risen up
<06965> (8787)
as an enemy
<0341> (8802)_:
ye pull off
<06584> (8686)
the robe
<0145>
with
<04136>
the garment
<08008>
from them that pass
<05674> (8802)
by securely
<0983>
as men averse
<07725> (8803)
from war
<04421>_.
{of late: Heb. yesterday} {with the: Heb. over against a}
HEBREW
hmxlm
<04421>
ybws
<07725>
xjb
<0983>
Myrbem
<05674>
Nwjspt
<06584>
rda
<0145>
hmlv
<08008>
lwmm
<04136>
Mmwqy
<06965>
bywal
<0341>
yme
<05971>
lwmtaw (2:8)
<0865>
LXXM
kai
<2532>  
CONJ
emprosyen
<1715>  
ADV
o
<3588>  
T-NSM
laov
<2992>  
N-NSM
mou
<1473>  
P-GS
eiv
<1519>  
PREP
ecyran
<2189>  
N-ASF
antesth
 
V-AAI-3S
katenanti
 
ADV
thv
<3588>  
T-GSF
eirhnhv
<1515>  
N-GSF
autou
<846>  
D-GSM
thn
<3588>  
T-ASF
doran
 
N-ASF
autou
<846>  
D-GSM
exedeiran
 
V-AAI-3P
tou
<3588>  
T-GSN
afelesyai
 
V-AMN
elpida
<1680>  
N-ASF
suntrimmon
 
N-ASM
polemou
<4171>  
N-GSM
NET © [draft] ITL
but
<0865>
you rise up
<06965>
as an enemy
<0341>
against
<04136>
my people
<05971>
. You steal
<06584>
a robe
<0145>

<08008>
from a friend, from those who pass by
<05674>
peacefully
<0983>
as if returning from
<07725>
a war
<04421>
.
NET © Notes

tc Heb “Recently my people rise up as an enemy.” The MT is problematic in light of v. 9, where “my people” are the object of oppression, not the perpetrators of it. The form וְאֶתְמוּל (vÿetmul, “and recently”) is probably the product of fusion and subsequent suppression of an (ע) ayin. The translation assumes an emendation to וְאַתֶּם עַל (vÿattemal, “and you against [my people]”). The second person plural pronoun fits well with the second plural verb forms of vv. 8b-10. If this emendation is accepted, then יְקוֹמֵם (yÿqomem, the imperfect of קוּם [qum]) should be emended to קָמִים (qamim; a participle from the same root).

tc Heb “From the front of a garment glory [or perhaps, “a robe”] you strip off,” but this makes little if any sense. The term מִמּוּל (mimmul, “from the front of”) is probably the product of dittography (note the preceding word, which ends in [ם] mem) and subsequent suppression of ע (ayin). The translation assumes an emendation to מֵעַל (meal, “from upon”). The translation also assumes an emendation of שַׂלְמָה אֶדֶר (salmaheder, “a garment, glory [or robe]”) to שֹׁלְמִים אֲדֶרֶת (sholÿmimaderet, “[from] a friend the robe [you strip off]”). The MT’s אֶדֶר (’eder) is the result of misdivision (the article has erroneously been attached to the preceding word) and haplography (of the final tav, which also begins the following word).

tc The passive participle שׁוּבֵי (shuvey) is unattested elsewhere and should be emended to a participle שָׁבִים (shavim).

tn Heb “from those passing by peacefully, returnees from war.” Actual refugees, however, are probably not in view. The second line compares those who pass by peacefully with individuals returning from war. The battle is over and they do not expect their own countrymen to attack them.