Lamentations 3:5

NET ©

He has besieged and surrounded me with bitter hardship.

NIV ©

He has besieged me and surrounded me with bitterness and hardship.

NASB ©

He has besieged and encompassed me with bitterness and hardship.

NLT ©

He has attacked me and surrounded me with anguish and distress.

MSG ©

He hemmed me in, ganged up on me, poured on the trouble and hard times.

BBE ©

He has put up a wall against me, shutting me in with bitter sorrow.

NRSV ©

he has besieged and enveloped me with bitterness and tribulation;

NKJV ©

He has besieged me And surrounded me with bitterness and woe.

KJV
He hath builded against
<01129> (8804)
me, and compassed
<05362> (8686)
[me] with gall
<07219>
and travail
<08513>_.
HEBREW
haltw
<08513>
sar
<07219>
Pqyw
<05362>
yle
<05921>
hnb (3:5)
<01129>
LXXM
anwkodomhsen
<456>  
V-AAI-3S
kat
<2596>  
PREP
emou
<1473>  
P-GS
kai
<2532>  
CONJ
ekuklwsen
<2944>  
V-AAI-3S
kefalhn
<2776>  
N-ASF
mou
<1473>  
P-GS
kai
<2532>  
CONJ
emocyhsen
 
V-AAI-3S
NET © [draft] ITL
He
<01129>
has besieged
<01129>
and surrounded
<05362>
me with bitter
<07219>
hardship
<08513>
.
NET © Notes

tn Heb “he has built against me.” The verb בָּנָה (banah, “to build”) followed by the preposition עַל (’al, “against”) often refers to the action of building siege-works against a city, that is, to besiege a city (e.g., Deut 20:2; 2 Kgs 25:1; Eccl 9:14; Jer 52:4; Ezek 4:2; 17:17; 21:27). Normally, an explicit accusative direct object is used (e.g., מָצוֹד [matsor] or מָצוֹדִים [matsorim]); however, here, the expression is used absolutely without an explicit accusative [BDB 124 s.v. בָּנָה 1a.η]).

tn The verb נָקַף (naqaf, “to surround”) refers to the military action of an army surrounding a besieged city by placing army encampments all around the city, to prevent anyone in the city from escaping (2 Kgs 6:14; 11:8; Pss 17:9; 88:18; Job 19:6).

tn Heb “with bitterness and hardship.” The nouns רֹאשׁ וּתְלָאָה (rosh utÿlaah, lit. “bitterness and hardship”) function as adverbial accusatives of manner: “with bitterness and hardship.” The two nouns רֹאשׁ וּתְלָאָה (rosh utÿlaah, “bitterness and hardship”) form a nominal hendiadys: the second retains its full nominal sense, while the first functions adverbially: “bitter hardship.” The noun II רֹאשׁ (rosh, “bitterness”) should not be confused with the common homonymic root I רֹאשׁ (rosh, “head”). The noun תְּלָאָה (tÿlaah, “hardship”) is used elsewhere in reference to the distress of Israel in Egypt (Num 20:14), in the wilderness (Exod 18:8), and in exile (Neh 9:32).