Internet Verse Search Commentaries Word Analysis ITL - draft

Jude 1:5

Context
NET ©

Now I desire to remind you (even though you have been fully informed of these facts 1  once for all 2 ) that Jesus, 3  having saved the 4  people out of the land of Egypt, later 5  destroyed those who did not believe.

NIV ©

Though you already know all this, I want to remind you that the Lord delivered his people out of Egypt, but later destroyed those who did not believe.

NASB ©

Now I desire to remind you, though you know all things once for all, that the Lord, after saving a people out of the land of Egypt, subsequently destroyed those who did not believe.

NLT ©

I must remind you––and you know it well––that even though the Lord rescued the whole nation of Israel from Egypt, he later destroyed every one of those who did not remain faithful.

MSG ©

I'm laying this out as clearly as I can, even though you once knew all this well enough and shouldn't need reminding. Here it is in brief: The Master saved a people out of the land of Egypt. Later he destroyed those who defected.

BBE ©

Now it is my purpose to put you in mind, though you once had knowledge of all these things, of how the Lord, having taken a people safely out of Egypt, later sent destruction on those who had no faith;

NRSV ©

Now I desire to remind you, though you are fully informed, that the Lord, who once for all saved a people out of the land of Egypt, afterward destroyed those who did not believe.

NKJV ©

But I want to remind you, though you once knew this, that the Lord, having saved the people out of the land of Egypt, afterward destroyed those who did not believe.


KJV
I will
<1014> (5736)
therefore
<1161>
put
<5279> (0)
you
<5209>
in remembrance
<5279> (5658)_,
though ye
<5209>
once
<530>
knew
<1492> (5761)
this
<5124>_,
how that
<3754>
the Lord
<2962>_,
having saved
<4982> (5660)
the people
<2992>
out of
<1537>
the land
<1093>
of Egypt
<125>_,
afterward
<1208>
destroyed
<622> (5656)
them that believed
<4100> (5660)
not
<3361>_.
NASB ©
Now
<1161>
I desire
<1014>
to remind
<5279>
you, though you know
<3609>
all
<3956>
things
<3956>
once
<530>
for all
<530>
, that the Lord
<2962>
, after saving
<4982>
a people
<2992>
out of the land
<1093>
of Egypt
<125>
, subsequently
<1208>
destroyed
<622>
those
<3588>
who did not believe
<4100>
.
GREEK
upomnhsai
<5279> (5658)
V-AAN
de
<1161>
CONJ
umav
<5209>
P-2AP
boulomai
<1014> (5736)
V-PNI-1S
eidotav
<1492> (5761)
V-RAP-APM
apax
<530>
ADV
panta
<3956>
A-APN
oti
<3754>
CONJ
kuriov
<2962>
N-NSM
laon
<2992>
N-ASM
ek
<1537>
PREP
ghv
<1093>
N-GSF
aiguptou
<125>
N-GSF
swsav
<4982> (5660)
V-AAP-NSM
to
<3588>
T-NSN
deuteron
<1208>
A-NSN
touv
<3588>
T-APM
mh
<3361>
PRT-N
pisteusantav
<4100> (5660)
V-AAP-APM
apwlesen
<622> (5656)
V-AAI-3S
NET © [draft] ITL
Now I desire
<1014>
to remind
<5279>
you
<5209>
(even though you have been fully informed
<1492>
of these facts once for all
<530>
) that
<3754>
Jesus
<2962>
, having saved
<4982>
the people
<2992>
out of
<1537>
the land
<1093>
of Egypt
<125>
, later
<1208>
destroyed
<622>
those who did
<4100>
not
<3361>
believe
<4100>
.
NET ©

Now I desire to remind you (even though you have been fully informed of these facts 1  once for all 2 ) that Jesus, 3  having saved the 4  people out of the land of Egypt, later 5  destroyed those who did not believe.

NET © Notes

tn Grk “knowing all things.” The subject of the participle “knowing” (εἰδότας, eidota") is an implied ὑμᾶς (Jumas), though several ancient witnesses actually add it. The πάντα (panta) takes on an adverbial force in this context (“fully”), intensifying how acquainted the readers are with the following points.

sn That Jude comments on his audience’s prior knowledge of what he is about to tell them (you have been fully informed of these facts) may imply that they were familiar with 2 Peter. In 2 Pet 2:4ff., the same illustrations from the OT are drawn. See the note on the following phrase once for all.

tc ‡ Some translations take ἅπαξ (Japax) with the following clause (thus, “[Jesus,] having saved the people once for all”). Such a translation presupposes that ἅπαξ is a part of the ὅτι (Joti) clause. The reading of NA27, πάντα ὅτι [] κύριος ἅπαξ (panta {oti [Jo] kurio" {apax), suggests this interpretation (though with “Lord” instead of “Jesus”). This particle is found before λαόν (laon) in the ὅτι clause in א C* Ψ 630 1241 1243 1505 1739 1846 1881 pc co. But ἅπαξ is found before the ὅτι clause in most witnesses, including several important ones (Ì72 A B C2 33 81 623 2344 Ï vg). What seems best able to explain the various placements of the adverb is that scribes were uncomfortable with ἅπαξ referring to the readers’ knowledge, feeling it was more appropriate to the theological significance of “saved” (σώσας, swsas).

sn In this translation, Jude is stressing that the readers have been informed once for all of the OT illustrations he is about to mention. Where would they get this information? Most likely from having read 2 Peter. Earlier Jude used the same adverb to indicate that these believers had a written record of the faith. This seems to be his implication here, too. Thus, for the second time Jude is appealing to the written documents of the early church as authoritative as opposed to the messages of the false teachers. As the 1st century began to draw to a close, the early church found itself increasingly dependent on the letters and gospels of the apostles and their associates. Once those apostles died, false apostles and false teachers sprang up, like wolves in sheep’s clothing (cf. Acts 20:29-30). To combat this, some of the latest books of the NT stressed the authority of what had been written (so Hebrews, Jude, Ephesians, 1 John). Although these writers anticipated the return of the Lord, they also braced their audiences for a delay of the parousia (the second coming of Christ) by suggesting that when they were gone the NT documents should guide them.

tc ‡ The reading ᾿Ιησοῦς (Ihsous, “Jesus”) is deemed too hard by several scholars, since it involves the notion of Jesus acting in the early history of the nation Israel. However, not only does this reading enjoy the strongest support from a variety of early witnesses (e.g., A B 33 81 1241 1739 1881 2344 pc vg co Or1739mg), but the plethora of variants demonstrate that scribes were uncomfortable with it, for they seemed to exchange κύριος (kurios, “Lord”) or θεός (qeos, “God”) for ᾿Ιησοῦς (though Ì72 has the intriguing reading θεὸς Χριστός [qeos Cristos, “God Christ”] for ᾿Ιησοῦς). In addition to the evidence supplied in NA27 for this reading, note also {88 322 323 424c 665 915 2298 eth Cyr Hier Bede}. As difficult as the reading ᾿Ιησοῦς is, in light of v. 4 and in light of the progress of revelation (Jude being one of the last books in the NT to be composed), it is wholly appropriate.

sn The construction our Master and Lord, Jesus Christ in v. 4 follows Granville Sharp’s rule (see note on Lord). The construction strongly implies the deity of Christ. This is followed by a statement that Jesus was involved in the salvation (and later judgment) of the Hebrews. He is thus to be identified with the Lord God, Yahweh. Verse 5, then, simply fleshes out what is implicit in v. 4.

tn Or perhaps “a,” though this is less likely.

tn Grk “the second time.”



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