Internet Verse Search Commentaries Word Analysis ITL - draft

Jonah 4:1

Context
NET ©

This displeased Jonah terribly 1  and he became very angry. 2 

NIV ©

But Jonah was greatly displeased and became angry.

NASB ©

But it greatly displeased Jonah and he became angry.

NLT ©

This change of plans upset Jonah, and he became very angry.

MSG ©

Jonah was furious. He lost his temper.

BBE ©

But this seemed very wrong to Jonah, and he was angry.

NRSV ©

But this was very displeasing to Jonah, and he became angry.

NKJV ©

But it displeased Jonah exceedingly, and he became angry.


KJV
But it displeased
<03415> (8799)
Jonah
<03124>
exceedingly
<01419> <07451>_,
and he was very angry
<02734> (8799)_.
NASB ©
But it greatly
<01419>
displeased
<07489>
Jonah
<03124>
and he became
<02734>
angry
<02734>
.
HEBREW
wl
<0>
rxyw
<02734>
hlwdg
<01419>
her
<07451>
hnwy
<03124>
la
<0413>
eryw (4:1)
<07489>
LXXM
kai
<2532
CONJ
eluphyh
<3076
V-API-3S
iwnav
<2495
N-NSM
luphn
<3077
N-ASF
megalhn
<3173
A-ASF
kai
<2532
CONJ
sunecuyh
<4797
V-API-3S
NET © [draft] ITL
This displeased
<07489>
Jonah
<03124>
terribly
<01419>
and he became very angry
<02734>
.
NET ©

This displeased Jonah terribly 1  and he became very angry. 2 

NET © Notes

tn Heb “It was evil to Jonah, a great evil.” The cognate accusative construction רוַיֵּרע...רָעָהַ (vayyera’…raah) emphasizes the great magnitude of his displeasure (e.g., Neh 2:10 for the identical construction; see IBHS 167 §10.2.1g). The verb רָעַע (raa’) means “to be displeasing” (BDB 949 s.v. רָעַע 1; e.g., Gen 21:11, 12; 48:17; Num 11:16; 22:34; Josh 24:15; 1 Sam 8:6; 2 Sam 11:25; Neh 2:10; 13:8; Prov 24:18; Jer 40:4). The use of the verb רָעַע (“to be evil, bad”) and the noun רָעָה (“evil, bad, calamity”) here in 4:1 creates a wordplay with the use of רָעָה in 3:8-10. When God saw that the Ninevites repented from their moral evil (רָעָה), he relented from the calamity (רָעָה) that he had threatened – and this development greatly displeased (רָעָה) Jonah.

tn Heb “it burned to him.” The verb חָרָה (kharah, “to burn”) functions figuratively here (hypocatastasis) referring to anger (BDB 354 s.v. חָרָה). It is related to the noun חֲרוֹן (kharon, “heat/burning”) in the phrase “the heat of his anger” in 3:9. The repetition of the root highlights the contrast in attitudes between Jonah and God: God’s burning anger “cooled off” when the Ninevites repented, but Jonah’s anger was “kindled” when God did not destroy Nineveh.



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