Internet Verse Search Commentaries Word Analysis ITL - draft

John 15:1

Context
NET ©

“I am the true vine 1  and my Father is the gardener. 2 

NIV ©

"I am the true vine, and my Father is the gardener.

NASB ©

"I am the true vine, and My Father is the vinedresser.

NLT ©

"I am the true vine, and my Father is the gardener.

MSG ©

"I am the Real Vine and my Father is the Farmer.

BBE ©

I am the true vine and my Father is the gardener.

NRSV ©

"I am the true vine, and my Father is the vinegrower.

NKJV ©

"I am the true vine, and My Father is the vinedresser.


KJV
I
<1473>
am
<1510> (5748)
the true
<228>
vine
<288>_,
and
<2532>
my
<3450>
Father
<3962>
is
<2076> (5748)
the husbandman
<1092>_.
NASB ©
"I am
<1510>
the true
<228>
vine
<288>
, and My Father
<3962>
is the vinedresser
<1092>
.
GREEK
egw
<1473>
P-1NS
eimi
<1510> (5748)
V-PXI-1S
h
<3588>
T-NSF
ampelov
<288>
N-NSF
h
<3588>
T-NSF
alhyinh
<228>
A-NSF
kai
<2532>
CONJ
o
<3588>
T-NSM
pathr
<3962>
N-NSM
mou
<3450>
P-1GS
o
<3588>
T-NSM
gewrgov
<1092>
N-NSM
estin
<1510> (5748)
V-PXI-3S
NET © [draft] ITL
“I
<1473>
am
<1510>
the true
<228>
vine
<288>
and
<2532>
my
<3450>
Father
<3962>
is
<1510>
the gardener
<1092>
.
NET ©

“I am the true vine 1  and my Father is the gardener. 2 

NET © Notes

sn I am the true vine. There are numerous OT passages which refer to Israel as a vine: Ps 80:8-16, Isa 5:1-7, Jer 2:21, Ezek 15:1-8, 17:5-10, 19:10-14, and Hos 10:1. The vine became symbolic of Israel, and even appeared on some coins issued by the Maccabees. The OT passages which use this symbol appear to regard Israel as faithless to Yahweh (typically rendered as “Lord” in the OT) and/or the object of severe punishment. Ezek 15:1-8 in particular talks about the worthlessness of wood from a vine (in relation to disobedient Judah). A branch cut from a vine is worthless except to be burned as fuel. This fits more with the statements about the disciples (John 15:6) than with Jesus’ description of himself as the vine. Ezek 17:5-10 contains vine imagery which refers to a king of the house of David, Zedekiah, who was set up as king in Judah by Nebuchadnezzar. Zedekiah allied himself to Egypt and broke his covenant with Nebuchadnezzar (and therefore also with God), which would ultimately result in his downfall (17:20-21). Ezek 17:22-24 then describes the planting of a cedar sprig which grows into a lofty tree, a figurative description of Messiah. But it is significant that Messiah himself is not described in Ezek 17 as a vine, but as a cedar tree. The vine imagery here applies to Zedekiah’s disobedience. Jesus’ description of himself as the true vine in John 15:1 ff. is to be seen against this background, but it differs significantly from the imagery surveyed above. It represents new imagery which differs significantly from OT concepts; it appears to be original with Jesus. The imagery of the vine underscores the importance of fruitfulness in the Christian life and the truth that this results not from human achievement, but from one’s position in Christ. Jesus is not just giving some comforting advice, but portraying to the disciples the difficult path of faithful service. To some degree the figure is similar to the head-body metaphor used by Paul, with Christ as head and believers as members of the body. Both metaphors bring out the vital and necessary connection which exists between Christ and believers.

tn Or “the farmer.”



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