Internet Verse Search Commentaries Word Analysis ITL - draft

Joel 1:1

Context
NET ©

This 1  is the Lord’s message 2  that was given 3  to Joel 4  the son of Pethuel:

NIV ©

The word of the LORD that came to Joel son of Pethuel.

NASB ©

The word of the LORD that came to Joel, the son of Pethuel:

NLT ©

The LORD gave this message to Joel son of Pethuel.

MSG ©

God's Message to Joel son of Pethuel:

BBE ©

The word of the Lord which came to Joel, the son of Pethuel.

NRSV ©

The word of the LORD that came to Joel son of Pethuel:

NKJV ©

The word of the LORD that came to Joel the son of Pethuel.


KJV
The word
<01697>
of the LORD
<03068>
that came to Joel
<03100>
the son
<01121>
of Pethuel
<06602>_.
NASB ©
The word
<01697>
of the LORD
<03068>
that came
<01961>
to Joel
<03100>
, the son
<01121>
of Pethuel
<06602>
:
HEBREW
lawtp
<06602>
Nb
<01121>
lawy
<03100>
la
<0413>
hyh
<01961>
rsa
<0834>
hwhy
<03068>
rbd (1:1)
<01697>
LXXM
logov
<3056
N-NSM
kuriou
<2962
N-GSM
ov
<3739
R-NSM
egenhyh
<1096
V-API-3S
prov
<4314
PREP
iwhl
<2493
N-PRI
ton
<3588
T-ASM
tou
<3588
T-GSM
bayouhl {N-PRI}
NET © [draft] ITL
This
<01697>
is the Lord’s
<03068>
message
<01697>
that
<0834>
was given to
<0413>
Joel
<03100>
the son
<01121>
of Pethuel
<06602>
:
NET ©

This 1  is the Lord’s message 2  that was given 3  to Joel 4  the son of Pethuel:

NET © Notes

sn The dating of the book of Joel is a matter of dispute. Some scholars date the book as early as the ninth century b.c., during the reign of the boy-king Joash. This view is largely based on the following factors: an argument from silence (e.g., the book of Joel does not mention a king, perhaps because other officials de facto carried out his responsibilities, and there is no direct mention in the book of such later Israelite enemies as the Assyrians, Babylonians, and Persians); inconclusive literary assumptions (e.g., the eighth-century prophet Amos in Amos 9:13 alludes to Joel 3:18); the canonical position of the book (i.e., it is the second book of the Minor Prophets); and literary style (i.e., the book is thought to differ in style from the postexilic prophetic writings). While such an early date for the book is not impossible, none of the arguments used to support it is compelling. Later dates for the book that have been defended by various scholars are, for example, the late seventh century or early sixth century or sometime in the postexilic period (anytime from late sixth century to late fourth century). Most modern scholars seem to date the book of Joel sometime between 400 and 350 b.c. For a helpful discussion of date see J. A. Thompson, “The Date of the Book of Joel,” A Light unto My Path, 453-64. Related to the question of date is a major exegetical issue: Is the army of chapter two to be understood figuratively as describing the locust invasion of chapter one, or is the topic of chapter two an invasion of human armies, either the Babylonians or an eschatological foe? If the enemy could be conclusively identified as the Babylonians, for example, this would support a sixth-century date for the book.

tn Heb “the word of the Lord.”

tn Heb “that was.” The term “given” does not appear in the Hebrew, but is supplied in the translation for the sake of clarity and smoothness.

sn The name Joel means in Hebrew “the Lord is God.” There are a dozen or so individuals with this name in the OT.



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