Internet Verse Search Commentaries Word Analysis ITL - draft

Job 41:9

Context
NET ©

(41:1) 1  See, his expectation is wrong, 2  he is laid low even at the sight of it. 3 

NIV ©

Any hope of subduing him is false; the mere sight of him is overpowering.

NASB ©

"Behold, your expectation is false; Will you be laid low even at the sight of him?

NLT ©

"No, it is useless to try to capture it. The hunter who attempts it will be thrown down.

MSG ©

What hope would you have with such a creature? Why, one look at him would do you in!

BBE ©

Truly, the hope of his attacker is false; he is overcome even on seeing him!

NRSV ©

Any hope of capturing it will be disappointed; were not even the gods overwhelmed at the sight of it?

NKJV ©

Indeed, any hope of overcoming him is false; Shall one not be overwhelmed at the sight of him?


KJV
Behold, the hope
<08431>
of him is in vain
<03576> (8738)_:
shall not [one] be cast down
<02904> (8714)
even at the sight
<04758>
of him?
NASB ©
"Behold
<02005>
, your expectation
<08431>
is false
<03576>
; Will you be laid
<02904>
low
<02904>
even
<01571>
at the sight
<04758>
of him?
HEBREW
ljy
<02904>
wyarm
<04758>
la
<0408>
Mgh
<01571>
hbzkn
<03576>
wtlxt
<08431>
Nh
<02005>
(41:9)
<41:1>
LXXM
(41:1) ouc
<3364
ADV
eorakav
<3708
V-RAI-2S
auton
<846
D-ASM
oude
<3761
CONJ
epi
<1909
PREP
toiv
<3588
T-DPM
legomenoiv
<3004
V-PMPDP
teyaumakav
<2296
V-RAI-2S
NET © [draft] ITL
See, his expectation
<08431>
is wrong, he is laid low even
<01571>
at
<04758>
the sight
<02904>
of it.
NET ©

(41:1) 1  See, his expectation is wrong, 2  he is laid low even at the sight of it. 3 

NET © Notes

sn Job 41:9 in the English Bible is 41:1 in the Hebrew text (BHS). From here to the end of the chapter the Hebrew verse numbers differ from those in the English Bible, with 41:10 ET = 41:2 HT, 41:11 ET = 41:3 HT, etc. See also the note on 41:1.

tn The line is difficult. “His hope [= expectation]” must refer to any assailant who hopes or expects to capture the creature. Because there is no antecedent, Dhorme and others transpose it with the next verse. The point is that the man who thought he was sufficient to confront Leviathan soon finds his hope – his expectation – false (a derivative from the verb כָּזַב [kazab, “lie”] is used for a mirage).

tn There is an interrogative particle in this line, which most commentators ignore. But others freely emend the MT. Gunkel, following the mythological approach, has “his appearance casts down even a god.” Cheyne likewise has: “even divine beings the fear of him brings low” (JQR 9 [1896/97]: 579). Pope has, “Were not the gods cast down at the sight of him?” There is no need to bring in this mythological element.



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