Internet Verse Search Commentaries Word Analysis ITL - draft

Job 3:1

Context
NET ©

After this Job opened his mouth 2  and cursed 3  the day he was born. 4 

NIV ©

After this, Job opened his mouth and cursed the day of his birth.

NASB ©

Afterward Job opened his mouth and cursed the day of his birth.

NLT ©

At last Job spoke, and he cursed the day of his birth.

MSG ©

Then Job broke the silence. He spoke up and cursed his fate:

BBE ©

Then, opening his mouth, and cursing the day of his birth,

NRSV ©

After this Job opened his mouth and cursed the day of his birth.

NKJV ©

After this Job opened his mouth and cursed the day of his birth .


KJV
After
<0310>
this opened
<06605> (8804)
Job
<0347>
his mouth
<06310>_,
and cursed
<07043> (8762)
his day
<03117>_.
NASB ©
Afterward
<0310>
<3651> Job
<0347>
opened
<06605>
his mouth
<06310>
and cursed
<07043>
the day
<03117>
of his birth.
HEBREW
P
wmwy
<03117>
ta
<0853>
llqyw
<07043>
whyp
<06310>
ta
<0853>
bwya
<0347>
xtp
<06605>
Nk
<03651>
yrxa (3:1)
<0310>
LXXM
meta
<3326
PREP
touto
<3778
D-ASN
hnoixen
<455
V-AAI-3S
iwb
<2492
N-PRI
to
<3588
T-ASN
stoma
<4750
N-ASN
autou
<846
D-GSM
NET © [draft] ITL
After
<0310>
this
<03651>
Job
<0347>
opened
<06605>
his mouth
<06310>
and cursed
<07043>
the day
<03117>
he was born.
NET ©

After this Job opened his mouth 2  and cursed 3  the day he was born. 4 

NET © Notes

sn The previous chapters (1-2) were prose narrative, this chapter, however, commences the poetic section of the book (chs. 3-41) containing the cycles of speeches.

sn The detailed introduction to the speech with “he opened his mouth” draws the readers attention to what was going to be said. As the introduction to the poetic speech that follows (3:3-26), vv. 1-2 continue the prose style of chapters 1-2. Each of the subsequent speeches is introduced by such a prose heading.

tn The verb “cursed” is the Piel preterite from the verb קָלַל (qalal); this means “to be light” in the Qal stem, but here “to treat lightly, with contempt, curse.” See in general H. C. Brichto, The Problem ofCursein the Hebrew Bible (JBLMS); and A. C. Thiselton, “The Supposed Power of Words in the Biblical Writings,” JTS 25 (1974): 283-99.

tn Heb “his day” (so KJV, ASV, NAB). The Syriac has “the day on which he was born.” The context makes it clear that Job meant the day of his birth. But some have tried to offer a different interpretation, such as his destiny or his predicament. For this reason the Syriac clarified the meaning for their readers in much the same way as the present translation does by rendering “his day” as “the day he was born.” On the Syriac translation of the book of Job, see Heidi M. Szpek, Translation Technique in the Peshitta to Job (SBLDS).



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