Jeremiah 11:18

NET ©

The Lord gave me knowledge, that I might have understanding. Then he showed me what the people were doing.

NIV ©

Because the LORD revealed their plot to me, I knew it, for at that time he showed me what they were doing.

NASB ©

Moreover, the LORD made it known to me and I knew it; Then You showed me their deeds.

NLT ©

Then the LORD told me about the plots my enemies were making against me.

MSG ©

God told me what was going on. That's how I knew. You, GOD, opened my eyes to their evil scheming.

BBE ©

And the Lord gave me knowledge of it and I saw it: then you made clear to me their doings.

NRSV ©

It was the LORD who made it known to me, and I knew; then you showed me their evil deeds.

NKJV ©

Now the LORD gave me knowledge of it , and I know it ; for You showed me their doings.

KJV
And the LORD
<03068>
hath given me knowledge
<03045> (8799)
[of it], and I know
<03045> (8689)
[it]: then thou shewedst
<07200> (8689)
me their doings
<04611>_.
HEBREW
Mhyllem
<04611>
yntyarh
<07200>
za
<0227>
hedaw
<03045>
yneydwh
<03045>
hwhyw (11:18)
<03068>
LXXM
kurie
<2962>  
N-VSM
gnwrison
<1107>  
V-AAD-2S
moi
<1473>  
P-DS
kai
<2532>  
CONJ
gnwsomai
<1097>  
V-FMI-1S
tote
<5119>  
ADV
eidon
<3708>  
V-AAI-1S
ta
<3588>  
T-APN
epithdeumata
 
N-APN
autwn
<846>  
D-GPM
NET © [draft] ITL
The Lord
<03068>
gave me knowledge
<03045>
, that I might have understanding
<03045>
. Then
<0227>
he showed
<07200>
me what the people were doing
<04611>
.
NET © Notes

tn Heb “caused me to know that I might know.” Many English versions supply an unstated object “their plots” which is referred to later in the context (cf. v. 19). The presupposition of this kind of absolute ellipsis is difficult to justify and would create the need for understanding an ellipsis of “it” also after “I knew.” It is better to see a bipolar use of the verb “know” here. For the second use of the verb “know” meaning “have understanding” see BDB 394 s.v. ָידַע Qal.5.

tn Heb “Then you showed me their deeds.” This is another example of the rapid shift in person which is common in Jeremiah. As elsewhere, it has been resolved for the sake of avoiding confusion for the English reader by leveling the referent to the same person throughout. The text again involves an apostrophe, talking about the Lord to addressing him.