Internet Verse Search Commentaries Word Analysis ITL - draft

Ephesians 1:10

Context
NET ©

toward the administration of the fullness of the times, to head up 1  all things in Christ – the things in heaven 2  and the things on earth. 3 

NIV ©

to be put into effect when the times will have reached their fulfilment—to bring all things in heaven and on earth together under one head, even Christ.

NASB ©

with a view to an administration suitable to the fullness of the times, that is, the summing up of all things in Christ, things in the heavens and things on the earth. In Him

NLT ©

And this is his plan: At the right time he will bring everything together under the authority of Christ––everything in heaven and on earth.

MSG ©

a long-range plan in which everything would be brought together and summed up in him, everything in deepest heaven, everything on planet earth.

BBE ©

The ordering of the times when they are complete, so that all things might come to a head in Christ, the things in heaven and the things on the earth; in him, I say,

NRSV ©

as a plan for the fullness of time, to gather up all things in him, things in heaven and things on earth.

NKJV ©

that in the dispensation of the fullness of the times He might gather together in one all things in Christ, both which are in heaven and which are on earth––in Him.


KJV
That in
<1519>
the dispensation
<3622>
of the fulness
<4138>
of times
<2540>
he might gather together in one
<346> (5664)
all things
<3956>
in
<1722>
Christ
<5547>_,
both
<5037>
which
<3588>
are in
<1722>
heaven
<3772>_,
and
<2532>
which
<3588>
are on
<1909>
earth
<1093>_;
[even] in
<1722>
him
<846>_:
{heaven: Gr. the heavens}
NASB ©
with a view
<1519>
to an administration
<3622>
suitable
<3588>
to the fullness
<4138>
of the times
<2540>
, that is, the summing
<346>
up of all
<3956>
things
<3956>
in Christ
<5547>
, things in the heavens
<3772>
and things on the earth
<1093>
. In Him
GREEK
eiv
<1519>
PREP
oikonomian
<3622>
N-ASF
tou
<3588>
T-GSN
plhrwmatov
<4138>
N-GSN
twn
<3588>
T-GPM
kairwn
<2540>
N-GPM
anakefalaiwsasyai
<346> (5664)
V-ADN
ta
<3588>
T-APN
panta
<3956>
A-APN
en
<1722>
PREP
tw
<3588>
T-DSM
cristw
<5547>
N-DSM
ta
<3588>
T-APN
epi
<1909>
PREP
toiv
<3588>
T-DPM
ouranoiv
<3772>
N-DPM
kai
<2532>
CONJ
ta
<3588>
T-APN
epi
<1909>
PREP
thv
<3588>
T-GSF
ghv
<1093>
N-GSF
NET © [draft] ITL
toward
<1519>
the administration
<3622>
of the fullness
<4138>
of the times
<2540>
, to head up
<346>
all things
<3956>
in
<1722>
Christ
<5547>
– the things in
<1909>
heaven
<3772>
and
<2532>
the things on
<1909>
earth
<1093>
.
NET ©

toward the administration of the fullness of the times, to head up 1  all things in Christ – the things in heaven 2  and the things on earth. 3 

NET © Notes

tn The precise meaning of the infinitive ἀνακεφαλαιώσασθαι (anakefalaiwsasqai) in v. 10 is difficult to determine since it was used relatively infrequently in Greek literature and only twice in the NT (here and Rom 13:9). While there have been several suggestions, three deserve mention: (1) “To sum up.” In Rom 13:9, using the same term, the author there says that the law may be “summarized in one command, to love your neighbor as yourself.” The idea then in Eph 1:10 would be that all things in heaven and on earth can be summed up and made sense out of in relation to Christ. (2) “To renew.” If this is the nuance of the verb then all things in heaven and earth, after their plunge into sin and ruin, are renewed by the coming of Christ and his redemption. (3) “To head up.” In this translation the idea is that Christ, in the fullness of the times, has been exalted so as to be appointed as the ruler (i.e., “head”) over all things in heaven and earth (including the church). That this is perhaps the best understanding of the verb is evidenced by the repeated theme of Christ’s exaltation and reign in Ephesians and by the connection to the κεφαλή- (kefalh-) language of 1:22 (cf. Schlier, TDNT 3:682; L&N 63.8; M. Barth, Ephesians [AB 34], 1:89-92; contra A. T. Lincoln, Ephesians [WBC], 32-33).

tn Grk “the heavens.”

sn And the things on earth. Verse 10 ends with “in him.” The redundancy keeps the focus on Christ at the expense of good Greek style. Verse 11 repeats the reference with a relative pronoun (“in whom”) – again, at the expense of good Greek style. Although the syntax is awkward, the theology is rich. This is not the first time that a NT writer was so overcome with awe for his Lord that he seems to have lost control of his pen. Indeed, it happened frequently enough that some have labeled their christologically motivated solecisms an “apostolic disease.”



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