Internet Verse Search Commentaries Word Analysis ITL - draft

2 Peter 3:9

Context
NET ©

The Lord is not slow concerning his promise, 1  as some regard slowness, but is being patient toward you, because he does not wish 2  for any 3  to perish but for all to come to repentance. 4 

NIV ©

The Lord is not slow in keeping his promise, as some understand slowness. He is patient with you, not wanting anyone to perish, but everyone to come to repentance.

NASB ©

The Lord is not slow about His promise, as some count slowness, but is patient toward you, not wishing for any to perish but for all to come to repentance.

NLT ©

The Lord isn’t really being slow about his promise to return, as some people think. No, he is being patient for your sake. He does not want anyone to perish, so he is giving more time for everyone to repent.

MSG ©

God isn't late with his promise as some measure lateness. He is restraining himself on account of you, holding back the End because he doesn't want anyone lost. He's giving everyone space and time to change.

BBE ©

The Lord is not slow in keeping his word, as he seems to some, but he is waiting in mercy for you, not desiring the destruction of any, but that all may be turned from their evil ways.

NRSV ©

The Lord is not slow about his promise, as some think of slowness, but is patient with you, not wanting any to perish, but all to come to repentance.

NKJV ©

The Lord is not slack concerning His promise, as some count slackness, but is longsuffering toward us, not willing that any should perish but that all should come to repentance.


KJV
The Lord
<2962>
is
<1019> (0)
not
<3756>
slack
<1019> (5719)
concerning his promise
<1860>_,
as
<5613>
some men
<5100>
count
<2233> (5736)
slackness
<1022>_;
but
<235>
is longsuffering
<3114> (5719)
to
<1519>
us-ward
<2248>_,
not
<3361>
willing
<1014> (5740)
that any
<5100>
should perish
<622> (5641)_,
but
<235>
that all
<3956>
should come
<5562> (5658)
to
<1519>
repentance
<3341>_.
NASB ©
The Lord
<2962>
is not slow
<1019>
about His promise
<1860>
, as some
<5100>
count
<2233>
slowness
<1022>
, but is patient
<3114>
toward
<1519>
you, not wishing
<1014>
for any
<5100>
to perish
<622>
but for all
<3956>
to come
<5562>
to repentance
<3341>
.
GREEK
ou
<3756>
PRT-N
bradunei
<1019> (5719)
V-PAI-3S
kuriov
<2962>
N-NSM
thv
<3588>
T-GSF
epaggeliav
<1860>
N-GSF
wv
<5613>
ADV
tinev
<5100>
X-NPM
braduthta
<1022>
N-ASF
hgountai
<2233> (5736)
V-PNI-3P
alla
<235>
CONJ
makroyumei
<3114> (5719)
V-PAI-3S
eiv
<1519>
PREP
umav
<5209>
P-2AP
mh
<3361>
PRT-N
boulomenov
<1014> (5740)
V-PNP-NSM
tinav
<5100>
X-APM
apolesyai
<622> (5641)
V-2AMN
alla
<235>
CONJ
pantav
<3956>
A-APM
eiv
<1519>
PREP
metanoian
<3341>
N-ASF
cwrhsai
<5562> (5658)
V-AAN
NET © [draft] ITL
The Lord
<2962>
is
<1019>
not
<3756>
slow
<1019>
concerning his promise
<1860>
, as
<5613>
some
<5100>
regard
<2233>
slowness
<1022>
, but
<235>
is being patient
<3114>
toward
<1519>
you
<5209>
, because he does
<1014>
not
<3361>
wish
<1014>
for any
<5100>
to perish
<622>
but
<235>
for all
<3956>
to come
<5562>
to
<1519>
repentance
<3341>
.
NET ©

The Lord is not slow concerning his promise, 1  as some regard slowness, but is being patient toward you, because he does not wish 2  for any 3  to perish but for all to come to repentance. 4 

NET © Notes

tn Or perhaps, “the Lord is not delaying [the fulfillment of] his promise,” or perhaps “the Lord of the promise is not delaying.” The verb can mean “to delay,” “to be slow,” or “to be hesitant.”

tn Grk “not wishing.” The participle most likely has a causal force, explaining why the Lord is patient.

sn He does not wish for any to perish. This verse has been a battleground between Arminians and Calvinists. The former argue that God wants all people to be saved, but either through inability or restriction of his own sovereignty does not interfere with peoples’ wills. Some of the latter argue that the “any” here means “any of you” and that all the elect will repent before the return of Christ, because this is God’s will. Both of these positions have problems. The “any” in this context means “any of you.” (This can be seen by the dependent participle which gives the reason why the Lord is patient “toward you.”) There are hints throughout this letter that the readership may be mixed, including both true believers and others who are “sitting on the fence” as it were. But to make the equation of this readership with the elect is unlikely. This would seem to require, in its historical context, that all of these readers would be saved. But not all who attend church know the Lord or will know the Lord. Simon the Magician, whom Peter had confronted in Acts 8, is a case in point. This is evident in contemporary churches when a pastor addresses the congregation as “brothers, sisters, saints, etc.,” yet concludes the message with an evangelistic appeal. When an apostle or pastor addresses a group as “Christian” he does not necessarily think that every individual in the congregation is truly a Christian. Thus, the literary context seems to be against the Arminian view, while the historical context seems to be against (one representation of) the Calvinist view. The answer to this conundrum is found in the term “wish” (a participle in Greek from the verb boulomai). It often represents a mere wish, or one’s desiderative will, rather than one’s resolve. Unless God’s will is viewed on the two planes of his desiderative and decretive will (what he desires and what he decrees), hopeless confusion will result. The scriptures amply illustrate both that God sometimes decrees things that he does not desire and desires things that he does not decree. It is not that his will can be thwarted, nor that he has limited his sovereignty. But the mystery of God’s dealings with humanity is best seen if this tension is preserved. Otherwise, either God will be perceived as good but impotent or as a sovereign taskmaster. Here the idea that God does not wish for any to perish speaks only of God's desiderative will, without comment on his decretive will.

tn Grk “reach to repentance.” Repentance thus seems to be a quantifiable state, or turning point. The verb χωρέω (cwrew, “reach”) typically involves the connotation of “obtain the full measure of” something. It is thus most appropriate as referring to the repentance that accompanies conversion.



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