Internet Verse Search Commentaries Word Analysis ITL - draft

2 Peter 3:10

Context
NETBible

But the day of the Lord will come like a thief; when it comes, 1  the heavens will disappear 2  with a horrific noise, 3  and the celestial bodies 4  will melt away 5  in a blaze, 6  and the earth and every deed done on it 7  will be laid bare. 8 

XREF

Ps 46:6; Ps 97:5; Ps 102:26; Isa 2:12; Isa 51:6; Joe 1:15; Joe 2:1,31; Joe 3:14; Am 9:5,13; Na 1:5; Mal 4:5; Mt 24:35; Mt 24:42,43; Mr 13:31; Lu 12:39; Ro 8:20; 1Co 5:5; 2Co 1:14; 1Th 5:2; Heb 1:11,12; 2Pe 3:7; 2Pe 3:12; Jude 1:6; Re 3:3; Re 16:15; Re 20:11; Re 21:1

NET © Notes

tn Grk “in which.”

tn Or “pass away.”

tn Or “hissing sound,” “whirring sound,” “rushing sound,” or “loud noise.” The word occurs only here in the NT. It was often used of the crackle of a fire, as would appear appropriate in this context.

tn Grk “elements.” Most commentators are agreed that “celestial bodies” is meant, in light of this well-worn usage of στοιχεῖα (stoiceia) in the 2nd century and the probable allusion to Isa 34:4 (text of Vaticanus). See R. Bauckham, Jude, 2 Peter [WBC], 315-16 for discussion.

tn Grk “be dissolved.”

tn Grk “being burned up.”

tn Grk “the works in it.”

tc One of the most difficult textual problems in the NT is found in v. 10. The reading εὑρεθήσεται (Jeureqhsetai), which enjoys by far the best support (א B K P 0156vid 323 1241 1739txt pc) is nevertheless so difficult a reading that many scholars regard it as nonsensical. (NA27 lists five conjectures by scholars, from Hort to Mayor, in this text.) As R. Bauckham has pointed out, solutions to the problem are of three sorts: (1) conjectural emendation (which normally speaks more of the ingenuity of the scholar who makes the proposal than of the truth of the conjecture, e.g., changing one letter in the previous word, ἔργα [erga] becomes ἄργα [arga] with the meaning, “the earth and the things in it will be found useless”); (2) adoption of one of several variant readings (all of which, however, are easier than this one and simply cannot explain how this reading arose, e.g., the reading of Ì72 which adds λυόμενα [luomena] to the verb – a reading suggested no doubt by the threefold occurrence of this verb in the surrounding verses: “the earth and its works will be found dissolved”; or the simplest variant, the reading of the Sahidic mss, οὐχ [ouc] preceding ἑυρεθήσεται – “will not be found”); or (3) interpretive gymnastics which regards the text as settled but has to do some manipulation to its normal meaning. Bauckham puts forth an excellent case that the third option is to be preferred and that the meaning of the term is virtually the equivalent of “will be disclosed,” “will be manifested.” (That this meaning is not readily apparent may in fact have been the reason for so many variants and conjectures.) Thus, the force of the clause is that “the earth and the works [done by men] in it will be stripped bare [before God].” In addition, the unusualness of the expression is certainly in keeping with the author’s style throughout this little book. Hence, what looks to be suspect because of its abnormalities, upon closer inspection is actually in keeping with the author’s stylistic idiosyncrasies. The meaning of the text then is that all but the earth and men’s works will be destroyed. Everything will be removed so that humanity will stand naked before God. Textually, then, on both external and internal grounds, εὑρεθήσεται commends itself as the preferred reading.



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