2 Kings 14:28

NET ©

The rest of the events of Jeroboam’s reign, including all his accomplishments, his military success in restoring Israelite control over Damascus and Hamath, are recorded in the scroll called the Annals of the Kings of Israel.

NIV ©

As for the other events of Jeroboam’s reign, all he did, and his military achievements, including how he recovered for Israel both Damascus and Hamath, which had belonged to Yaudi, are they not written in the book of the annals of the kings of Israel?

NASB ©

Now the rest of the acts of Jeroboam and all that he did and his might, how he fought and how he recovered for Israel, Damascus and Hamath, which had belonged to Judah, are they not written in the Book of the Chronicles of the Kings of Israel?

NLT ©

The rest of the events in the reign of Jeroboam II and all his deeds, including the extent of his power, his wars, and how he recovered for Israel both Damascus and Hamath, which had belonged to Judah, are recorded in The Book of the History of the Kings of Israel.

MSG ©

The rest of the life and times of Jeroboam, his victories in battle and how he recovered for Israel both Damascus and Hamath which had belonged to Judah, these are all written in [The Chronicles of the Kings of Israel].

BBE ©

Now the rest of the acts of Jeroboam, and all he did, and his power, and how he went to war with Damascus, causing the wrath of the Lord to be turned away from Israel, are they not recorded in the book of the history of the kings of Israel?

NRSV ©

Now the rest of the acts of Jeroboam, and all that he did, and his might, how he fought, and how he recovered for Israel Damascus and Hamath, which had belonged to Judah, are they not written in the Book of the Annals of the Kings of Israel?

NKJV ©

Now the rest of the acts of Jeroboam, and all that he did––his might, how he made war, and how he recaptured for Israel, from Damascus and Hamath, what had belonged to Judah–– are they not written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Israel?

KJV
Now the rest
<03499>
of the acts
<01697>
of Jeroboam
<03379>_,
and all that he did
<06213> (8804)_,
and his might
<01369>_,
how he warred
<03898> (8738)_,
and how he recovered
<07725> (8689)
Damascus
<01834>_,
and Hamath
<02574>_,
[which belonged] to Judah
<03063>_,
for Israel
<03478>_,
are they not written
<03789> (8803)
in the book
<05612>
of the chronicles
<01697> <03117>
of the kings
<04428>
of Israel
<03478>_?
HEBREW
larvy
<03478>
yklml
<04428>
Mymyh
<03117>
yrbd
<01697>
rpo
<05612>
le
<05921>
Mybwtk
<03789>
Mh
<01992>
alh
<03808>
larvyb
<03478>
hdwhyl
<03063>
tmx
<02574>
taw
<0853>
qvmd
<01834>
ta
<0853>
bysh
<07725>
rsaw
<0834>
Mxln
<03898>
rsa
<0834>
wtrwbgw
<01369>
hve
<06213>
rsa
<0834>
lkw
<03605>
Mebry
<03379>
yrbd
<01697>
rtyw (14:28)
<03499>
LXXM
kai
<2532>  
CONJ
ta
<3588>  
T-NPN
loipa
 
A-NPN
twn
<3588>  
T-GPM
logwn
<3056>  
N-GPM
ieroboam
 
N-PRI
kai
<2532>  
CONJ
panta
<3956>  
A-APN
osa
<3745>  
A-APN
epoihsen
<4160>  
V-AAI-3S
kai
<2532>  
CONJ
ai
<3588>  
T-NPF
dunasteiai
 
N-NPF
autou
<846>  
D-GSM
osa
<3745>  
A-APN
epolemhsen
<4170>  
V-AAI-3S
kai
<2532>  
CONJ
osa
<3745>  
A-APN
epestreqen
<1994>  
V-AAI-3S
thn
<3588>  
T-ASF
damaskon
<1154>  
N-ASF
kai
<2532>  
CONJ
thn
<3588>  
T-ASF
aimay
 
N-PRI
tw
<3588>  
T-DSM
iouda
<2448>  
N-PRI
en
<1722>  
PREP
israhl
<2474>  
N-PRI
ouci
<3364>  
ADV
tauta
<3778>  
D-NPN
gegrammena
<1125>  
V-RPPNP
epi
<1909>  
PREP
bibliw
<975>  
N-DSN
logwn
<3056>  
N-GPM
twn
<3588>  
T-GPF
hmerwn
<2250>  
N-GPF
toiv
<3588>  
T-DPM
basileusin
<935>  
N-DPM
israhl
<2474>  
N-PRI
NET © [draft] ITL
The rest
<03499>
of the events
<01697>
of Jeroboam’s
<03379>
reign, including all
<03605>
his accomplishments
<06213>
, his military success
<01369>
in restoring
<07725>
Israelite
<03478>
control over Damascus
<01834>
and Hamath
<02574>
, are
<01992>
recorded
<03789>
in the scroll
<05612>
called the Annals
<03117>

<01697>
of the Kings
<04428>
of Israel
<03478>
.
NET © Notes

tn Heb “As for the rest of the events of Jeroboam, and all which he did and his strength, [and] how he fought and how he restored Damascus and Hamath to Judah in Israel, are they not written on the scroll of the events of the days of the kings of Israel?” The phrase “to Judah” is probably not original; it may be a scribal addition by a Judahite scribe who was trying to link Jeroboam’s conquests with the earlier achievements of David and Solomon, who ruled in Judah. The Syriac Peshitta has simply “to Israel.” M. Cogan and H. Tadmor (II Kings [AB], 162) offer this proposal, but acknowledge that it is “highly speculative.”