Internet Verse Search Commentaries Word Analysis ITL - draft

2 Corinthians 7:8

Context
NET ©

For even if I made you sad 1  by my letter, 2  I do not regret having written it 3  (even though I did regret it, 4  for 5  I see that my letter made you sad, 6  though only for a short time).

NIV ©

Even if I caused you sorrow by my letter, I do not regret it. Though I did regret it—I see that my letter hurt you, but only for a little while—

NASB ©

For though I caused you sorrow by my letter, I do not regret it; though I did regret it— for I see that that letter caused you sorrow, though only for a while—

NLT ©

I am no longer sorry that I sent that letter to you, though I was sorry for a time, for I know that it was painful to you for a little while.

MSG ©

I know I distressed you greatly with my letter. Although I felt awful at the time, I don't feel at all bad now that I see how it turned out. The letter upset you, but only for a while.

BBE ©

For though my letter gave you pain, I have no regret for it now, though I had before; for I see that the letter gave you pain, but only for a time.

NRSV ©

For even if I made you sorry with my letter, I do not regret it (though I did regret it, for I see that I grieved you with that letter, though only briefly).

NKJV ©

For even if I made you sorry with my letter, I do not regret it; though I did regret it. For I perceive that the same epistle made you sorry, though only for a while.


KJV
For
<3754>
though
<1499>
I made
<3076> (0)
you
<5209>
sorry
<3076> (5656)
with
<1722>
a letter
<1992>_,
I do
<3338> (0)
not
<3756>
repent
<3338> (5736)_,
though
<1499>
I did repent
<3338> (5711)_:
for
<1063>
I perceive
<991> (5719)
that
<3754>
the same
<1565>
epistle
<1992>
hath made
<3076> (0)
you
<5209>
sorry
<3076> (5656)_,
though [it were] but
<1499>
for
<4314>
a season
<5610>_.
NASB ©
For though
<1487>
<2532> I caused
<3076>
you sorrow
<3076>
by my letter
<1992>
, I do not regret
<3338>
it; though
<1487>
<2532> I did regret
<3338>
it--for I see
<991>
that that letter
<1992>
caused
<3076>
you sorrow
<3076>
, though
<1487>
<2532> only
<2532>
for a while
<5610>
--
GREEK
oti
<3754>
CONJ
ei
<1487>
COND
kai
<2532>
CONJ
eluphsa
<3076> (5656)
V-AAI-1S
umav
<5209>
P-2AP
en
<1722>
PREP
th
<3588>
T-DSF
epistolh
<1992>
N-DSF
ou
<3756>
PRT-N
metamelomai
<3338> (5736)
V-PNI-1S
ei
<1487>
COND
kai
<2532>
CONJ
metemelomhn
<3338> (5711)
V-INI-1S
blepw
<991> (5719)
V-PAI-1S
oti
<3754>
CONJ
h
<3588>
T-NSF
epistolh
<1992>
N-NSF
ekeinh
<1565>
D-NSF
ei
<1487>
COND
kai
<2532>
CONJ
prov
<4314>
PREP
wran
<5610>
N-ASF
eluphsen
<3076> (5656)
V-AAI-3S
umav
<5209>
P-2AP
NET © [draft] ITL
For
<3754>
even if
<1487>
I made
<3076>
you
<5209>
sad
<3076>
by
<1722>
my letter
<1992>
, I do
<3338>
not
<3756>
regret
<3338>
having written it (even though
<2532>
I did regret
<3338>
it, for I see
<991>
that
<3754>
my letter
<1992>
made
<3076>
you
<5209>
sad
<3076>
, though only for
<4314>
a short time
<5610>
).
NET ©

For even if I made you sad 1  by my letter, 2  I do not regret having written it 3  (even though I did regret it, 4  for 5  I see that my letter made you sad, 6  though only for a short time).

NET © Notes

tn Grk “if I grieved you.”

sn My letter. Paul is referring to the “severe” letter mentioned in 2 Cor 2:4.

tn Grk “I do not regret”; direct objects in Greek must often be supplied from the context. Here one could simply supply “it,” but since Paul is referring to the effects of his previous letter, clarity is improved if “having written it” is supplied.

tn Grk “I did regret”; the direct object “it” must be supplied from the context.

tc A few important mss (Ì46c B D* it sa) lack γάρ (gar, “for”), while the majority of witnesses have it (א C D1 F G Ψ 0243 33 1739 1881 Ï sy bo). Even though Ì46* omits γάρ, it has the same sense (viz., a subordinate clause) because it reads the participle βλέπων (blepwn, “seeing”; the Vulgate does the same). A decision is difficult because although the overwhelming external evidence is on the side of the conjunction, the lack of γάρ is a significantly harder reading, for the whole clause is something of an anacoluthon. Without the conjunction, the sentence reads more harshly. This would fit with Paul’s “vehemence of spirit” (A. T. Robertson, A Grammar of the Greek New Testament, 435) that is found especially in 2 Corinthians and Galatians. However, the mss that omit the conjunction are prone to such tendencies at times. In this instance, the conjunction should probably stand.

tn Grk “my letter grieved you.”



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