Results 1 - 20 of 34 for sailed (0.000 seconds)
(1.00)(Act 18:18)

tn That is, “before he sailed from Cenchrea.”

(0.83)(Act 27:40)

tn <i>Grki> &#8220;sail&#8221;; probably a reference to the foresail.

(0.75)(Act 27:8)

tn <i>Grki> &#8220;sailing along the coast&#8230;we came.&#8221; The participle <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#960;&#945;&#961;&#945;&#955;&#949;&#947;&#972;&#956;&#949;&#957;&#959;&#953;font> (<font face="Greektl">paralegomenoifont>) has been translated as a finite verb due to requirements of contemporary English style. L&amp;N 54.8, &#8220;<font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#960;&#945;&#961;&#945;&#955;&#941;&#947;&#959;&#956;&#945;&#953;font>: (a technical, nautical term) to sail along beside some object &#8211; &#8216;to sail along the coast, to sail along the shore.&#8217; &#8230;&#8216;they sailed along the coast of Crete&#8217; Ac 27:13.&#8221;

(0.75)(Act 27:13)

tn L&amp;N 54.8, &#8220;<font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#960;&#945;&#961;&#945;&#955;&#941;&#947;&#959;&#956;&#945;&#953;font>: (a technical, nautical term) to sail along beside some object &#8211; &#8216;to sail along the coast, to sail along the shore.&#8217;&#8230;&#8216;they sailed along the coast of Crete&#8217; Ac 27:13.&#8221; With the addition of the adverb <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#7942;&#963;&#963;&#959;&#957;font> (<font face="Greektl">assonfont>) this becomes &#8220;sailed close along the coast of Crete.&#8221;

(0.71)(Act 21:3)

sn The expression <i>left it behind on our port sidei> here means &#8220;sailed past to the south of it&#8221; since the ship was sailing east.

(0.59)(Act 16:11)

tn BDAG 406 s.v. <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#949;&#8016;&#952;&#965;&#948;&#961;&#959;&#956;&#941;&#969;font> has &#8220;of a ship <i>run a straight coursei>&#8221; here; L&amp;N 54.3 has &#8220;to sail a straight course, sail straight to.&#8221;

(0.59)(Act 21:1)

tn BDAG 406 s.v. <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#949;&#8016;&#952;&#965;&#948;&#961;&#959;&#956;&#941;&#969;font> has &#8220;of a ship <i>run a straight coursei>&#8221;; L&amp;N 54.3 has &#8220;to sail a straight course, sail straight to.&#8221;

(0.50)(Act 10:11)

tn Or &#8220;a large linen cloth&#8221; (the term was used for the sail of a ship; BDAG 693 s.v. <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#8000;&#952;&#972;&#957;&#951;font>).

(0.50)(Act 15:39)

tn <i>Grki> &#8220;taking along Mark sailed.&#8221; The participle <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#960;&#945;&#961;&#945;&#955;&#945;&#946;&#972;&#957;&#964;&#945;font> (<font face="Greektl">paralabontafont>) has been translated as a finite verb due to requirements of contemporary English style.

(0.50)(Act 20:15)

tn <i>Grki> &#8220;setting sail from there.&#8221; The participle <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#7936;&#960;&#959;&#960;&#955;&#949;&#973;&#963;&#945;&#957;&#964;&#949;&#962;font> (<font face="Greektl">apopleusante&quot;font>) has been translated as a finite verb due to requirements of contemporary English style.

(0.50)(Rev 18:17)

tn Or perhaps, &#8220;everyone who sails as a passenger.&#8221; On <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#960;&#955;&#941;&#969;&#957;font> (<font face="Greektl">plewnfont>) BDAG 825 s.v. <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#960;&#955;&#941;&#969;font> states, &#8220;<font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#960;&#8118;&#962; &#8001; &#7952;&#960;&#8054; &#964;&#972;&#960;&#959;&#957; &#960;&#955;&#941;&#969;&#957;font> <i>everyone who sails to a place = seafarer, sea traveleri>&#8230;Rv 18:17. The vv.ll.&#8230;have led to various interpretations. Some render: <i>everyone who sails along the coasti>&#8230;See EbNestle, Einf&#252;hrung in das Griech. NT 1909, 182; AFridrichsen, K. Hum. Vetensk.-Samf. i Upps. &#197;rsb. &#8217;43, 31 note <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#8001; &#7952;&#960;&#943;&#964;&#959;&#960;&#959;&#957; &#960;&#955;&#941;&#969;&#957;font>=one who sails occasionally, a passenger. &#8211; S. also IHeikel, StKr 106, &#8217;34/&#8217;35, 317).&#8221;

(0.47)(Act 20:15)

tn Or &#8220;crossed over to,&#8221; &#8220;arrived at.&#8221; L&amp;N 54.12 has &#8220;<font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#960;&#945;&#961;&#945;&#946;&#940;&#955;&#955;&#969;font>: (a technical, nautical term) to sail up to or near &#8211; &#8216;to approach, to arrive at, to sail to.&#8217; <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#960;&#945;&#961;&#949;&#946;&#940;&#955;&#959;&#956;&#949;&#957; &#949;&#7984;&#962; &#931;&#940;&#956;&#959;&#957;font> &#8216;we approached Samos&#8217; or &#8216;we arrived at Samos&#8217; Ac 20:15.&#8221;

(0.42)(Act 27:2)

sn Although not explicitly stated, the ship <i>put out to seai> from the port of Caesarea (where the previous events had taken place (cf. 25:13) and then sailed along the Asiatic coast (the first stop was <i>Sidoni>, v. 3).

(0.42)(Act 27:7)

tn BDAG 1040 s.v. <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#8017;&#960;&#959;&#960;&#955;&#941;&#969;font> states, &#8220;<i>sail under the lee ofi> an island, i.e. in such a way that the island protects the ship fr. the wind Ac 27:4, 7.&#8221;

(0.42)(Act 27:21)

tn L&amp;N 36.12 has &#8220;<font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#960;&#949;&#953;&#952;&#945;&#961;&#967;&#8053;&#963;&#945;&#957;&#964;&#940;&#962; &#956;&#959;&#953; &#956;&#8052; &#7936;&#957;&#940;&#947;&#949;&#963;&#952;&#945;&#953; &#7936;&#960;&#8056; &#964;&#8134;&#962; &#922;&#961;&#8053;&#964;&#951;&#962;font> &#8216;you should have listened to me and not have sailed from Crete&#8217; Ac 27:21.&#8221;

(0.42)(Act 27:24)

tn <i>Grki> &#8220;God has graciously granted you all who are sailing with you.&#8221; The words &#8220;the safety of&#8221; have been supplied to clarify the meaning of the verb <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#954;&#949;&#967;&#940;&#961;&#953;&#963;&#964;&#945;&#953;font> (<font face="Greektl">kecaristaifont>) in this context.

(0.42)(Act 28:10)

tn BDAG 384 s.v. <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#7952;&#960;&#953;&#964;&#943;&#952;&#951;&#956;&#953;font> 1.b has &#8220;<i>givei> <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#964;&#953;&#957;&#943; &#964;&#953;font> <i>someth. to someonei>&#8230;<font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#7936;&#957;&#945;&#947;&#959;&#956;&#941;&#957;&#959;&#953;&#962; &#964;&#8048; &#960;&#961;&#8056;&#962; &#964;&#8048;&#962; &#967;&#961;&#949;&#943;&#945;&#962;font> <i>when we sailed they gave us what we neededi> Ac 28:10.&#8221;

(0.36)(Act 27:17)

tn Or perhaps &#8220;mainsail.&#8221; The meaning of this word is uncertain. BDAG 927 s.v. <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#963;&#954;&#949;&#8166;&#959;&#962;font> 1 has &#8220;<font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#964;&#8056; &#963;&#954;&#949;&#8166;&#959;&#962;font> Ac 27:17 seems to be the <i>kedgei> or <i>driving anchori>&#8221; while C. Maurer (<i>TDNTi> 7:362) notes, &#8220;The meaning in Ac. 27:17: <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#967;&#945;&#955;&#940;&#963;&#945;&#957;&#964;&#949;&#962; &#964;&#8056; &#963;&#954;&#949;&#8166;&#959;&#962;font>, is uncertain. Prob. the ref. is not so much to taking down the sails as to throwing the draganchor overboard to lessen the speed of the ship.&#8221; In spite of this L&amp;N 6.1 states, &#8220;In Ac 27:17, for example, the reference of <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#963;&#954;&#949;&#8166;&#959;&#962;font> is generally understood to be the mainsail.&#8221; A reference to the sail is highly unlikely because in a storm of the force described in Ac 27:14, the sail would have been taken down and reefed immediately, to prevent its being ripped to shreds or torn away by the gale.

(0.33)(Pro 15:19)

sn The contrast to the &#8220;thorny way&#8221; is the highway, the Hebrew word signifying a well built-up road (<font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1505;&#1464;&#1500;&#1463;&#1500;font>, <font face="Scholar">salalfont>, &#8220;to heap up&#8221;). The upright have no reason to swerve, duck, or detour, but may expect &#8220;clear sailing.&#8221; Other passages pair these two concepts, e.g., Prov 6:10; 10:26; 28:19.

(0.33)(Isa 33:23)

tn The words &#8220;though at this time&#8221; are supplied in the translation for clarification. The first half of the verse is addressed to Judah and contrasts the nation&#8217;s present weakness with its future prosperity. Judah is compared to a ship that is incapable of sailing.