Texts Notes Verse List Exact Search
Results 1 - 20 of 37 for risked (0.000 seconds)
Jump to page: 1 2 Next
  Discovery Box
(1.00) (Act 15:26)

tn Grk “who have risked their souls”; the equivalent English idiom is “risk one’s life.” The descriptions commend Barnabas and Paul as thoroughly trustworthy.

(0.82) (Mat 19:25)

sn The assumption is that the rich are blessed, so if they risk exclusion, who is left to be saved?

(0.82) (Mar 10:26)

sn The assumption is that the rich are blessed, so if they risk exclusion, who is left to be saved?

(0.82) (Luk 13:3)

sn Jesus was stressing that all stand at risk of death, if they do not repent and receive life.

(0.82) (Luk 18:26)

sn The assumption is that the rich are blessed, so if they risk exclusion, who is left to be saved?

(0.71) (Luk 11:26)

sn The point of the story is that to fail to respond is to risk a worse fate than when one started.

(0.71) (Act 5:25)

sn Obeying God (see v. 29), the apostles were teaching again (4:18-20; 5:20). They did so despite the risk.

(0.71) (Act 12:20)

tn Or “for a reconciliation.” There were grave political risks in having Herod angry at them. The detail shows the ruler’s power.

(0.67) (Psa 17:9)

tn Heb “my enemies, at the risk of life they surround me.” The Hebrew phrase בְּנֶפֶשׁ (bÿnefesh) sometimes has the nuance “at the risk of [one’s] life” (see 1 Kgs 2:23; Prov 7:23; Lam 5:9).

(0.59) (Exo 22:15)

tn Literally “it came with/for its hire,” this expression implies that the owner who hired it out and was present was prepared to take the risk, so there would be no compensation.

(0.59) (Pro 26:17)

sn Someone who did this ran a serious risk of injury or harm. Dogs were not domestic pets in the ancient Near East; they were scavengers that ran in packs like jackals.

(0.59) (Luk 6:29)

sn The command do not withhold your tunic either is again an image of continually being totally at risk as one tries to keep contact with those who are hostile to what Jesus and his disciples offer.

(0.59) (Act 21:4)

sn Although they told this to Paul through the Spirit, it appears Paul had a choice here (see v. 14). Therefore this amounted to a warning: There was risk in going to Jerusalem, so he was urged not to go.

(0.47) (Exo 33:4)

sn The people would rather have risked divine discipline than to go without Yahweh in their midst. So they mourned, and they took off the ornaments. Such had been used in making the golden calf, and so because of their association with all of that they were to be removed as a sign of remorse.

(0.47) (Job 15:28)

sn K&D 11:266 rightly explains that these are not cities that he, the wicked, has destroyed, but that were destroyed by a judgment on wickedness. Accordingly, Eliphaz is saying that the wicked man is willing to risk such a curse in his confidence in his prosperity (see further H. H. Rowley, Job [NCBC], 113).

(0.47) (Pro 6:1)

tn Heb “stranger.” The term זוּר (zur, “stranger”) probably refers to a neighbor who was not well-known. Alternatively, it could describe a person who is living outside the norms of convention, a moral misfit in the community. In any case, this “stranger” is a high risk in any financial arrangement.

(0.47) (Pro 11:15)

tn The sentence begins with the Niphal imperfect and the cognate (רַע־יֵרוֹעַ, ra-yeroa’), stressing that whoever does this “will certainly suffer hurt.” The hurt in this case will be financial responsibility for a bad risk.

(0.47) (Pro 23:2)

sn The expression “put a knife to your throat” is an idiom that means “curb your appetite” or “control yourself” (cf. TEV). The instruction was from a time when people dealt with all-powerful tyrants. To enter the presence of such a person and indulge one’s appetites would be to take a very high risk.

(0.47) (Pro 25:7)

sn This proverb, covering the two verses, is teaching that it is wiser to be promoted than to risk demotion by self-promotion. The point is clear: Trying to promote oneself could bring on public humiliation; but it would be an honor to have everyone in court hear the promotion by the king.

(0.47) (Mat 16:25)

sn The point of the saying whoever wants to save his life will lose it is that if one comes to Jesus then rejection by many will certainly follow. If self-protection is a key motivation, then one will not respond to Jesus and will not be saved. One who is willing to risk rejection will respond and find true life.



TIP #15: To dig deeper, please read related articles at bible.org (via Articles Tab). [ALL]
created in 0.08 seconds
powered by bible.org