Results 1 - 11 of 11 for revenge (0.000 seconds)
(1.00)(Jdg 16:28)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;so I can get revenge with one act of vengeance.&#8221;

(1.00)(Isa 1:24)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;console myself&#8221; (i.e., by getting revenge); NRSV &#8220;pour out my wrath on.&#8221;

(0.75)(Psa 137:1)

sn <i>Psalm 137i>. The Babylonian exiles lament their condition, vow to remain loyal to Jerusalem, and appeal to God for revenge on their enemies.

(0.63)(Jdg 15:7)

tn The Niphal of <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1504;&#1464;&#1511;&#1464;&#1501;font> (<font face="Scholar">naqamfont>, &#8220;to avenge, to take vengeance&#8221;) followed by the preposition <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1489;font> (<font face="Scholar">betfont>) has the force &#8220;to get revenge against.&#8221; See 1 Sam 18:25; Jer 50:15; Ezek 25:12.

(0.50)(Gen 27:40)

sn <i>You will tear off his yoke from your necki>. It may be that this prophetic blessing found its fulfillment when Jerusalem fell and Edom got its revenge. The oracle makes Edom subservient to Israel and suggests the Edomites would live away from the best land and be forced to sustain themselves by violent measures.

(0.50)(Act 4:29)

sn <i>Grant to your servants to speak your message with great courage.i> The request is not for a stop to persecution or revenge on the opponents, but for boldness (<i>great couragei>) to carry out the mission of proclaiming the message of what God is doing through Jesus.

(0.44)(Pro 5:9)

sn The term <b><font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1492;&#1493;&#1465;&#1491;font>b> (<font face="Scholar">hodfont>, &#8220;vigor; splendor; majesty&#8221;) in this context means the best time of one&#8217;s life (cf. NIV &#8220;your best strength&#8221;), the full manly vigor that will be wasted with licentiousness. Here it is paralleled by &#8220;years,&#8221; which refers to the best years of that vigor, the prime of life. Life would be ruined by living this way, or the revenge of the woman&#8217;s husband would cut it short.

(0.38)(Gen 45:24)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;do not be stirred up in the way.&#8221; The verb means &#8220;stir up.&#8221; Some understand the Hebrew verb <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1512;&#1464;&#1490;&#1464;&#1494;font> (<font face="Scholar">ragazfont>, &#8220;to stir up&#8221;) as a reference to quarreling (see Prov 29:9, where it has this connotation), but in Exod 15:14 and other passages it means &#8220;to fear.&#8221; This might refer to a fear of robbers, but more likely it is an assuring word that they need not be fearful about returning to Egypt. They might have thought that once Jacob was in Egypt, Joseph would take his revenge on them.

(0.31)(Isa 63:4)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;for the day of vengeance was in my heart, and the year of my revenge came.&#8221; The term <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1490;&#1468;&#1456;&#1488;&#1493;&#1468;&#1500;&#1463;&#1497;font> (<font face="Scholar">g&#255;font>&#8217;<font face="Scholar">ulaifont>) is sometimes translated here &#8220;my redemption,&#8221; for the verbal root <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1490;&#1488;&#1500;font> often means &#8220;deliver, buy back.&#8221; A <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1490;&#1468;&#1465;&#1488;&#1461;&#1500;font> (<font face="Scholar">gofont>&#8217;<font face="Scholar">elfont>, &#8220;kinsman-redeemer&#8221;) was responsible for protecting the extended family&#8217;s interests, often by redeeming property that had been sold outside the family. However, the responsibilities of a <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1490;&#1468;&#1465;&#1488;&#1461;&#1500;font> extended beyond financial concerns. He was also responsible for avenging the shed blood of a family member (see Num 35:19-27; Deut 19:6-12). In Isa 63:4, where vengeance is a prominent theme (note the previous line), it is probably this function of the family protector that is in view. The Lord pictures himself as a blood avenger who waits for the day of vengeance to arrive and then springs into action.

(0.31)(Jer 50:28)

sn This verse appears to be a parenthetical exclamation of the prophet in the midst of his report of what the <sc>Lordsc> said through him. He throws himself into the future and sees the fall of Babylon and hears the people reporting in Zion how God has destroyed Babylon to get revenge for the Babylonians destroying his temple. Jeremiah prophesied from 627 <sc>b.c.sc> (see the study note on 1:2) until sometime after 586 <sc>b.c.sc> after Jerusalem fell and he was taken to Egypt. The fall of Babylon occurred in 538 <sc>b.c.sc> some fifty years later. However, Jeremiah had prophesied as early as the first year of Nebuchadnezzar&#8217;s reign (605 <sc>b.c.sc>; Jer 25:1) that many nations and great kings would come and subject Babylon, the instrument of God&#8217;s wrath &#8211; his sword against the nations &#8211; to bondage (Jer 25:12-14).

(0.25)(Nah 1:2)

tn The verb &#8220;rage&#8221; (<font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1504;&#1464;&#1496;&#1463;&#1512;font>, <font face="Scholar">natarfont>) is used elsewhere of keeping a vineyard (Song 1:6; 8:11-12) and guarding a secret (Dan 7:28). When used of anger, it does not so much mean &#8220;to control anger&#8221; or &#8220;to be slow to anger&#8221; (<i>HALOTi> 695 s.v.) but &#8220;to stay angry&#8221; (<i>TWOTi> 2:576). It describes a person bearing a grudge, seeking revenge, and refusing to forgive (Lev 19:18). It is often used as a synonym of <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1513;&#1473;&#1464;&#1502;&#1463;&#1512;font> (<font face="Scholar">shamarfont>, &#8220;to maintain wrath, stay angry&#8221;) in collocation with <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1500;&#1456;&#1506;&#1493;&#1465;&#1500;&#1464;&#1501;font> (<font face="Scholar">l&#255;font>&#8217;<font face="Scholar">olamfont>, &#8220;forever, always&#8221;) and <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1500;&#1464;&#1506;&#1463;&#1491;font> (<font face="Scholar">lafont>&#8217;<font face="Scholar">adfont>, &#8220;continually&#8221;) to picture God harboring rage against his enemies forever (Jer 3:5, 12; Amos 1:11; Ps 103:9). The long-term rage depicted by <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1504;&#1464;&#1496;&#1463;&#1512;font> (&#8220;maintain rage&#8221;) serves as an appropriate bridge to the following statement in Nahum that the <sc>Lordsc> is slow to anger but furious in judgment. God seeks vengeance against his enemies; he continually rages and maintains his anger; he is slow to anger, but will eventually burst out with the full fury of his wrath.