Results 1 - 5 of 5 for midnight (0.000 seconds)
(1.00)(Pro 31:18)

sn The line may be taken literally to mean that she is industrious throughout the night (&#8220;burning the midnight oil&#8221;) when she must in order to follow through a business deal (W. McKane, <i>Proverbsi> [OTL], 668); cf. TEV. But the line could also be taken figuratively, comparing &#8220;her light&#8221; to the prosperity of her household &#8211; her whole life &#8211; which continues night and day.

(1.00)(Joh 4:6)

sn <i>It was about noon.i> The suggestion has been made by some that time should be reckoned from midnight rather than sunrise. This would make the time 6 a.m. rather than noon. That would fit in this passage but not in John 19:14 which places the time when Jesus is condemned to be crucified at &#8220;the sixth hour.&#8221;

(0.71)(Joh 1:39)

sn <i>About four o&#8217;clock in the afternoon.i> What system of time reckoning is the author using? B. F. Westcott thought John, unlike the synoptic gospels, was using Roman time, which started at midnight (<i>St. Johni>, 282). This would make the time 10 a.m., which would fit here. But later in the Gospel&#8217;s Passover account (John 19:42, where the sixth hour is on the &#8220;eve of the Passover&#8221;) it seems clear the author had to be using Jewish reckoning, which began at 6 a.m. This would make the time here in 1:39 to be 4 p.m. This may be significant: If the hour was late, Andrew and the unnamed disciple probably spent the night in the same house where Jesus was staying, and the events of 1:41-42 took place on the next day. The evidence for Westcott&#8217;s view, that the Gospel is using Roman time, is very slim. The Roman reckoning which started at midnight was only used by authorities as legal time (for contracts, official documents, etc.). Otherwise, the Romans too reckoned time from 6 a.m. (e.g., Roman sundials are marked VI, not XII, for noon).

(0.50)(Mat 26:74)

tn It seems most likely that this refers to a real rooster crowing, although a number of scholars have suggested that &#8220;cockcrow&#8221; is a technical term referring to the trumpet call which ended the third watch of the night (from midnight to 3 a.m.). This would then be a reference to the Roman <i>galliciniumi> (<font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#7936;&#955;&#949;&#954;&#964;&#959;&#961;&#959;&#966;&#969;&#957;&#943;&#945;font>, <font face="Greektl">alektorofwniafont>; the term is used in Mark 13:35 and is found in some <sc>msssc> [<font face="Greek Uncials">&#204;font><sup>37vid,45sup> <font face="Greek Uncials">&#203;font><sup>1sup>] in Matt 26:34) which would have been sounded at 3 a.m.; in this case Jesus would have prophesied a precise time by which the denials would have taken place. For more details see J. H. Bernard, <i>St. Johni> (ICC), 2:604. However, in light of the fact that Mark mentions the rooster crowing twice (Mark 14:72) and in Luke 22:60 the words are reversed (<font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#7952;&#966;&#8061;&#957;&#951;&#963;&#949;&#957; &#7936;&#955;&#941;&#954;&#964;&#969;&#961;font>, <font face="Greektl">efwnhsen alektwrfont>), it is more probable that a real rooster is in view. In any event natural cockcrow would have occurred at approximately 3 a.m. in Palestine at this time of year (March-April) anyway.

(0.50)(Joh 18:27)

tn It seems most likely that this refers to a real rooster crowing, although a number of scholars have suggested that &#8220;cockcrow&#8221; is a technical term referring to the trumpet call which ended the third watch of the night (from midnight to 3 a.m.). This would then be a reference to the Roman <i>galliciniumi> (<font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#7936;&#955;&#949;&#954;&#964;&#959;&#961;&#959;&#966;&#969;&#957;&#943;&#945;font>, <font face="Greektl">alektorofwniafont>; the term is used in Mark 13:35 and is found in some <sc>msssc> [<font face="Greek Uncials">&#204;font><sup>37vid,45sup> <font face="Greek Uncials">&#203;font><sup>1sup>] in Matt 26:34) which would have been sounded at 3 a.m.; in this case Jesus would have prophesied a precise time by which the denials would have taken place. For more details see J. H. Bernard, <i>St. Johni> (ICC), 2:604. However, in light of the fact that Mark mentions the rooster crowing twice (Mark 14:72) and in Luke 22:60 the words are reversed (<font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#7952;&#966;&#8061;&#957;&#951;&#963;&#949;&#957; &#7936;&#955;&#941;&#954;&#964;&#969;&#961;font>, <font face="Greektl">efwnhsen alektwrfont>), it is more probable that a real rooster is in view. In any event natural cockcrow would have occurred at approximately 3 a.m. in Palestine at this time of year (March-April) anyway.