Results 1 - 5 of 5 for gibberish (0.000 seconds)
(1.00)(Isa 28:13)

sn When divine warnings and appeals become gibberish to the spiritually insensitive, they have no guidance and are doomed to destruction.

(0.71)(Isa 28:11)

sn This verse alludes to the coming Assyrian invasion, when the people will hear a foreign language that sounds like gibberish to them. The Lord is the subject of the verb “will speak,” as v. 12 makes clear. He once spoke in meaningful terms, but in the coming judgment he will speak to them, as it were, through the mouth of foreign oppressors. The apparent gibberish they hear will be an outward reminder that God has decreed their defeat.

(0.50)(Isa 28:13)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;And the word of the Lord will be to them, &#8216;tsahv latsahv,&#8217; etc.&#8221; See the note at v. 10. In this case the &#8220;Lord&#8217;s word&#8221; is not the foreigner&#8217;s strange sounding words (as in v. 10), but the Lord&#8217;s repeated appeals to them (like the one quoted in v. 12). As time goes on, the Lord&#8217;s appeals through the prophets will have no impact on the people; they will regard prophetic preaching as gibberish.

(0.36)(Isa 18:2)

tn Once more the precise meaning of the qualifying terms is uncertain. The expression <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1511;&#1463;&#1493;&#1470;&#1511;&#1464;&#1493;font> (<font face="Scholar">qav-qavfont>) is sometimes related to a proposed Arabic cognate and taken to mean &#8220;strength&#8221; (see BDB 876 II <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1511;&#1463;&#1493;font>). Others, on the basis of Isa 28:10, 13, understand the form as gibberish (literally, &#8220;kav, kav&#8221;) and take it to be a reference to this nation&#8217;s strange, unknown language. The form <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1502;&#1456;&#1489;&#1493;&#1468;&#1505;&#1464;&#1492;font> (<font face="Scholar">m&#255;vusahfont>) appears to be derived from <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1489;&#1468;&#1493;&#1468;&#1505;font> (<font face="Scholar">busfont>, &#8220;to trample&#8221;), so lexicographers suggest the meaning &#8220;trampling&#8221; or &#8220;subjugation,&#8221; i.e., a nation that subdues others. See BDB 101 s.v. <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1489;&#1468;&#1493;&#1468;&#1505;font> and <i>HALOTi> 541 s.v. <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1502;&#1456;&#1489;&#1493;&#1468;&#1505;&#1464;&#1492;font>. These proposals, which are based on etymological speculation, must be regarded as tentative.

(0.29)(Isa 28:10)

tn The meaning of this verse has been debated. The text has literally &#8220;indeed [or &#8220;for&#8221;] a little there, a little there&#8221; ( <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1499;&#1468;&#1460;&#1497; &#1510;&#1463;&#1493; &#1500;&#1464;&#1510;&#1464;&#1493; &#1510;&#1463;&#1493; &#1500;&#1464;&#1510;&#1464;&#1493; &#1511;&#1463;&#1493; &#1500;&#1464;&#1511;&#1464;&#1493; &#1511;&#1463;&#1493;font>, <font face="Scholar">ki tsav latsavfont>, <font face="Scholar">tsav latsavfont>, <font face="Scholar">qav laqavfont>, <font face="Scholar">qav laqavfont>). The present translation assumes that the repetitive syllables are gibberish that resembles baby talk (cf v. 9b) and mimics what the people will hear when foreign invaders conquer the land (v. 11). In this case <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1494;&#1456;&#1506;&#1461;&#1497;&#1512;font> (<font face="Scholar">z&#255;font>&#8217;<font face="Scholar">erfont>, &#8220;a little&#8221;) refers to the short syllabic structure of the babbling (cf. CEV). Some take <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1510;&#1463;&#1493;font> (<font face="Scholar">tsavfont>) as a derivative of <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1510;&#1464;&#1493;&#1464;&#1492;font> (<font face="Scholar">tsavahfont>, &#8220;command&#8221;) and translate the first part of the statement as &#8220;command after command, command after command.&#8221; Proponents of this position (followed by many English versions) also take <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1511;&#1463;&#1493;font> (<font face="Scholar">qavfont>) as a noun meaning &#8220;measuring line&#8221; (see v. 17), understood here in the abstract sense of &#8220;standard&#8221; or &#8220;rule.&#8221;