Results 21 - 40 of 70 for fortress (0.000 seconds)
(0.42)(2Ch 24:25)

sn The phrase <i>the City of Davidi> refers here to the fortress of Zion in Jerusalem, not to Bethlehem. See 2 Sam 5:7.

(0.42)(2Ch 25:28)

sn The phrase <i>the City of Davidi> refers here to the fortress of Zion in Jerusalem, not to Bethlehem. See 2 Sam 5:7.

(0.42)(2Ch 27:9)

sn The phrase <i>the City of Davidi> refers here to the fortress of Zion in Jerusalem, not to Bethlehem. See 2 Sam 5:7.

(0.42)(2Ch 28:27)

sn The phrase <i>the City of Davidi> refers here to the fortress of Zion in Jerusalem, not to Bethlehem. See 2 Sam 5:7.

(0.42)(2Ch 32:5)

sn The phrase <i>the City of Davidi> refers here to the fortress of Zion in Jerusalem, not to Bethlehem. See 2 Sam 5:7.

(0.42)(2Ch 32:30)

sn The phrase <i>the City of Davidi> refers here to the fortress of Zion in Jerusalem, not to Bethlehem. See 2 Sam 5:7.

(0.42)(2Ch 33:14)

sn The phrase <i>the City of Davidi> refers here to the fortress of Zion in Jerusalem, not to Bethlehem. See 2 Sam 5:7.

(0.42)(Psa 48:13)

sn The city&#8217;s <i>towersi>, <i>defensesi>, and <i>fortressesi> are outward reminders and tangible symbols of the divine protection the city enjoys.

(0.42)(Pro 14:26)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;confidence of strength.&#8221; This construct phrase features an attributive genitive: &#8220;strong confidence&#8221; (so most English versions; NIV &#8220;a secure fortress&#8221;).

(0.42)(Act 21:31)

tn <i>Grki> &#8220;went up&#8221;; this verb is used because the report went up to the Antonia Fortress where the Roman garrison was stationed.

(0.40)(Amo 4:3)

tn The meaning of this word is unclear. Many understand it as a place name, though such a location is not known. Some (e.g., H. W. Wolff, <i>Joel and Amosi> [Hermeneia[, 204) emend to &#8220;Hermon&#8221; or to similarly written words, such as &#8220;the dung heap&#8221; (NEB, NJPS), &#8220;the garbage dump&#8221; (NCV), or &#8220;the fortress&#8221; (cf. NLT &#8220;your fortresses&#8221;).

(0.37)(Isa 13:22)

tc The Hebrew text reads literally, &#8220;wild dogs will yip among his widows, and jackals in the palaces of pleasure.&#8221; The verb &#8220;yip&#8221; is supplied in the second line; it does double duty in the parallel structure. &#8220;His widows&#8221; makes little sense in this context; many emend the form (<font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1488;&#1463;&#1500;&#1456;&#1502;&#1504;&#1493;&#1465;&#1514;&#1464;&#1497;&#1493;font>, &#8217;<font face="Scholar">almnotayvfont>) to the graphically similar <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1488;&#1463;&#1512;&#1456;&#1502;&#1456;&#1504;&#1493;&#1465;&#1514;&#1462;&#1497;&#1492;&#1464;font> (&#8217;<font face="Scholar">arm&#255;notehafont>, &#8220;her fortresses&#8221;), a reading that is assumed in the present translation. The use of &#8220;widows&#8221; may represent an intentional wordplay on &#8220;fortresses,&#8221; indicating that the fortresses are like dejected widows (J. N. Oswalt, <i>Isaiahi> [NICOT], 1:308, n. 1).

(0.35)(2Ki 15:25)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;and he struck him down in Samaria in the fortress of the house of the king, Argob and Arieh, and with him fifty men from the sons of the Gileadites, and they killed him.&#8221;

(0.35)(Dan 11:10)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;and he will certainly come and overflow and cross over and return and be aroused unto a fortress.&#8221; The translation has attempted to simplify the syntax of this difficult sequence.

(0.35)(Oba 1:3)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;in the concealed places of the rock&#8221;; KJV, NAB, NASB, NIV, NRSV &#8220;in the clefts of the rock&#8221;; NCV &#8220;the hollow places of the cliff&#8221;; CEV &#8220;a mountain fortress.&#8221;

(0.35)(Nah 3:8)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;from (the) sea.&#8221; The form should be emended to <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1502;&#1463;&#1497;&#1460;&#1501;font> (<font face="Scholar">mayimfont>, &#8220;water&#8221;). This is a figurative description of the Nile River: It functioned like a fortress wall for Thebes.

(0.30)(Jer 48:1)

tn Or &#8220;Misgab.&#8221; The translation here follows the majority of commentaries and English versions. Only REB sees this as a place name, &#8220;Misgab,&#8221; which is otherwise unknown. The constant use of this word to refer to a fortress, the presence of the article on the front of it, and the lack of any reference to a place of this name anywhere else argues against it being a place name. However, the fact that the verbs that accompany it are feminine while the noun for &#8220;fortress&#8221; is masculine causes some pause.

(0.28)(Est 1:2)

tn The Hebrew word <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1489;&#1468;&#1460;&#1497;&#1512;&#1464;&#1492;font> (<font face="Scholar">birahfont>) can refer to a castle or palace or temple. Here it seems to have in mind that fortified part of the city that might be called an acropolis or citadel. Cf. KJV &#8220;palace&#8221;; NAB &#8220;stronghold&#8221;; NASB &#8220;capital&#8221;; NLT &#8220;fortress.&#8221;

(0.28)(Sos 8:9)

sn The term <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1496;&#1460;&#1497;&#1512;&#1464;&#1492;font> (<font face="Scholar">tirahfont>, &#8220;battlement, turret&#8221;) refers to the row of stones along the top of a fortress wall, set for the defense and stability of the wall (Ezek 46:23; cf. <i>HALOTi> 374 s.v. <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1496;&#1460;&#1497;&#1512;&#1464;&#1492;font>). This structure is connected with military operations set in defense of a siege.

(0.28)(Isa 23:4)

tn J. N. Oswalt (<i>Isaiahi> [NICOT], 1:430-31) sees here a reference to Yam, the Canaanite god of the sea. He interprets the phrase <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1502;&#1464;&#1506;&#1493;&#1465;&#1494; &#1492;&#1463;&#1497;&#1468;&#1464;&#1501;font> (<font face="Scholar">mafont>&#8217;<font face="Scholar">oz hayyamfont>, &#8220;fortress of the sea&#8221;) as a title of Yam, translating &#8220;Mighty One of the Sea.&#8221; A more traditional view is that the phrase refers to Sidon.