Results 21 - 40 of 76 for firm (0.000 seconds)
(0.38)(Psa 39:5)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;surely, all vapor [is] all mankind, standing firm.&#8221; Another option is to translate, &#8220;Surely, all mankind, though seemingly secure, is nothing but a vapor.&#8221;

(0.38)(Jon 2:9)

tn The verbs translated &#8220;I will sacrifice&#8221; and &#8220;I will pay&#8221; are Hebrew cohortatives, expressing Jonah&#8217;s resolve and firm intention.

(0.38)(Luk 9:51)

tn <i>Grki> &#8220;he set his face,&#8221; a Semitic idiom that speaks of a firm, unshakable resolve to do something (Gen 31:21; Isa 50:7).

(0.35)(Num 12:7)

tn The word &#8220;faithful&#8221; is <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1504;&#1462;&#1488;&#1457;&#1502;&#1464;&#1503;font> (<font face="Scholar">nefont>&#8217;<font face="Scholar">emanfont>), the Niphal participle of the verb <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1488;&#1464;&#1502;&#1463;&#1503;font> (&#8217;<font face="Scholar">amanfont>). This basic word has the sense of &#8220;support, be firm.&#8221; In the Niphal it describes something that is firm, reliable, dependable &#8211; what can be counted on. It could actually be translated &#8220;trustworthy.&#8221;

(0.35)(Pro 29:4)

tn The form is the Hiphil imperfect of the verb <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1506;&#1464;&#1502;&#1463;&#1491;font> (&#8217;<font face="Scholar">amadfont>, &#8220;to stand&#8221;), hence, &#8220;to cause to stand.&#8221; It means that the king makes the nation &#8220;stand firm,&#8221; with &#8220;standing firm&#8221; being a figure for strength, security, and stability. Cf. NCV &#8220;makes his country (the nation CEV) strong.&#8221;

(0.35)(Isa 26:3)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;[one of] firm purpose you will keep [in] peace, peace, for in you he possesses trust.&#8221; The Hebrew term <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1497;&#1461;&#1510;&#1462;&#1512;font> (<font face="Scholar">yetserfont>) refers to what one devises in the mind; <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1505;&#1464;&#1502;&#1493;&#1468;&#1498;&#1456;font> (<font face="Scholar">samukhfont>) probably functions here like an attributive adjective and carries the nuance &#8220;firm.&#8221; So the phrase literally means, &#8220;a firm purpose,&#8221; but as the object of the verb &#8220;keep, guard,&#8221; it must stand by metonymy for the one(s) who possess a firm purpose. In this context the &#8220;righteous nation&#8221; (v. 2) is probably in view and the &#8220;firm purpose&#8221; refers to their unwavering faith in God&#8217;s vindication (see 25:9). In this context <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1513;&#1473;&#1464;&#1500;&#1493;&#1465;&#1501;font> (<font face="Scholar">shalomfont>, &#8220;peace&#8221;), which is repeated for emphasis, likely refers to national security, not emotional or psychological composure (see vv. 1-2). The passive participle <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1489;&#1468;&#1464;&#1496;&#1493;&#1468;&#1495;&#1463;font> (<font face="Scholar">batuakhfont>) expresses a state that results from the subject&#8217;s action.

(0.31)(Job 33:19)

tc The <i>Kethibi> &#8220;the strife of his bones is continual,&#8221; whereas the <i>Qerei> has &#8220;the multitude of his bones are firm.&#8221; The former is the better reading in this passage. It indicates that the pain is caused by the ongoing strife.

(0.31)(Pro 21:29)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;he hardens his face.&#8221; To make the face firm or hard means to show boldness (BDB 738 s.v. <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1506;&#1464;&#1494;&#1463;&#1494;font> Hiph); cf. NRSV &#8220;put on a bold face.&#8221;

(0.31)(Pro 25:15)

sn The idea of breaking a bone uses the hardest and most firm part of the body in contrast to the &#8220;softness of the tongue.&#8221; Both are figurative, forming a comparison. A gentle speech can break down any stiff opposition.

(0.31)(Isa 8:9)

tn The imperatival form (<i>Hebi> &#8220;be shattered&#8221;) is rhetorical and expresses the speaker&#8217;s firm conviction of the outcome of the nations&#8217; attack. See the note on &#8220;be broken.&#8221;

(0.31)(Jer 24:6)

tn The words &#8220;There&#8221; and &#8220;firmly in the land&#8221; are not in the text but are implicit from the connection and the metaphor. They are supplied in the translation for clarity.

(0.31)(Act 11:28)

sn This <i>faminei> is one of the firmly fixed dates in Acts. It took place from <sc>a.d.sc> 45-48. The events described in chap. 11 of Acts occurred during the early part of that period.

(0.31)(Phi 1:28)

sn The antecedent of the pronoun <i>Thisi> is conceptual, most likely referring to the Philippian Christians standing firm for the gospel. Thus, their stand for the gospel is the dual sign of their opponents&#8217; <i>destructioni> and of their own <i>salvationi>.

(0.31)(1Ti 1:19)

tn In Greek this continues the same sentence from v. 18, a participle showing the means by which Timothy will accomplish his task: <i>Grki> &#8220;fight the good fight, holding firmly&#8230;&#8221;

(0.31)(Rev 2:1)

tn <i>Grki> &#8220;holds,&#8221; but the term (i.e., <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#954;&#961;&#945;&#964;&#8182;&#957;font>, <font face="Greektl">kratwnfont>) with an accusative object, along with the context, argues for a sense of firmness. (Cf. <i>ExSyni> 132.)

(0.27)(Psa 119:89)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;Forever, O <sc>Lordsc>, your word stands firm in heaven,&#8221; or &#8220;Forever, O <sc>Lordsc>, [is] your word; it stands firm in heaven.&#8221; The translation assumes that &#8220;your word&#8221; refers here to the body of divine instructions contained in the law (note the frequent references to the law in vv. 92-96). See vv. 9, 16-17, 57, 101, 105, 130, 139 and 160-61. The reference in v. 86 to God&#8217;s law being faithful favors this interpretation. Another option is that &#8220;your word&#8221; refers to God&#8217;s assuring word of promise, mentioned in vv. 25, 28, 42, 65, 74, 81, 107, 114, 147 and 169. In this case one might translate, &#8220;O <sc>Lordsc>, your promise is reliable, it stands firm in heaven.&#8221;

(0.25)(Exo 7:13)

sn For more on this subject, see B. Jacob, <i>Exodusi>, 241-49. S. R. Driver (<i>Exodusi>, 53) notes that when this word (<font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1495;&#1464;&#1494;&#1463;&#1511;font>) is used it indicates a will or attitude that is unyielding and firm, but when <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1499;&#1468;&#1464;&#1489;&#1461;&#1491;font> (<font face="Scholar">kavedfont>) is used, it stresses the will as being slow to move, unimpressionable, slow to be affected.

(0.25)(Exo 10:26)

sn Moses gives an angry but firm reply to Pharaoh&#8217;s attempt to control Israel; he makes it clear that he has no intention of leaving any pledge with Pharaoh. When they leave, they will take everything that belongs to them.

(0.25)(Exo 14:14)

tn The imperfect tense needs to be interpreted in contrast to all that Yahweh will be doing. It may be given a potential imperfect nuance (as here), or it may be obligatory to follow the command to stand firm: &#8220;you must be still.&#8221;

(0.25)(Job 2:3)

tn The form is the Hiphil participle, &#8220;make strong, seize, hold fast.&#8221; It is the verbal use here; joined with <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1506;&#1465;&#1491;&#1462;&#1504;&#1468;&#1493;&#1468;font> (&#8217;<font face="Scholar">odennufont>, &#8220;yet he&#8221;) it emphasizes that &#8220;he is still holding firmly.&#8221; The testing has simply strengthened Job in his integrity.