Results 1 - 10 of 10 for filthy (0.001 seconds)
(1.00)(Nah 3:6)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;detestable things&#8221;; KJV, ASV &#8220;abominable filth&#8221;; NCV &#8220;filthy garbage.&#8221;

(0.70)(Isa 64:6)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;and like a garment of menstruation [are] all our righteous acts&#8221;; KJV, NIV &#8220;filthy rags&#8221;; ASV &#8220;a polluted garment.&#8221;

(0.70)(Phi 3:2)

sn <i>Dogsi> is a figurative reference to false teachers whom Paul regards as just as filthy as dogs.

(0.57)(Lam 3:45)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;offscouring and refuse.&#8221; The two nouns <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1505;&#1456;&#1495;&#1460;&#1497; &#1493;&#1468;&#1502;&#1464;&#1488;&#1493;&#1465;&#1505;font> (<font face="Scholar">s&#255;khi umafont>&#8217;<font face="Scholar">osfont>) probably form a nominal hendiadys, in which the first noun functions as an adjective and the second retains its full nominal sense: &#8220;filthy refuse,&#8221; i.e., &#8220;filthy scum.&#8221;

(0.50)(Pro 30:12)

sn <i>Filthinessi> often refers to physical uncleanness, but here it refers to moral defilement. Zech 3:3-4 uses it metaphorically as well for the sin of the nation (e.g., Isa 36:12).

(0.50)(Eze 47:8)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;to the sea, those which are brought out.&#8221; The reading makes no sense. The text is best emended to read &#8220;filthy&#8221; (i.e., stagnant). See L. C. Allen, <i>Ezekieli> (WBC), 2:273.

(0.50)(Rev 22:11)

tn <i>Grki> &#8220;filthy, and the.&#8221; This is a continuation of the previous sentence in Greek, but because of the length and complexity of the construction a new sentence was started in the translation.

(0.30)(Lam 1:17)

tn The noun II <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1504;&#1460;&#1491;&#1468;&#1464;&#1492;font> (<font face="Scholar">niddahfont>, &#8220;unclean thing&#8221;) has three basic categories of meaning: (1) biological uncleanness: menstruation of a woman (Lev 12:2, 5; 15:19-33 [9x]; Num 19:9, 13, 20; 31:23; Ezek 18:6; 22:10; 36:17); (2) ceremonial uncleanness: moral impurity and idolatry (Lev 20:21; 2 Chr 29:5; Ezra 9:11; Zech 13:1); and (3) physical uncleanness: filthy garbage (Lam 1:17; Ezek 7:19, 20).

(0.30)(Zep 3:1)

tn The present translation assumes <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1502;&#1465;&#1512;&#1456;&#1488;&#1464;&#1492;font> (<font face="Scholar">morfont>&#8217;<font face="Scholar">ahfont>) is derived from <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1512;&#1465;&#1488;&#1460;&#1497;font> (<font face="Scholar">rofont>&#8217;<font face="Scholar">ifont>,&#8220;excrement&#8221;; see Jastrow 1436 s.v. <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1512;&#1459;&#1488;&#1460;&#1497;font>). The following participle, &#8220;stained,&#8221; supports this interpretation (cf. NEB &#8220;filthy and foul&#8221;; NRSV &#8220;soiled, defiled&#8221;). Another option is to derive the form from <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1502;&#1464;&#1512;&#1464;&#1492;font> (<font face="Scholar">marahfont>, &#8220;to rebel&#8221;); in this case the term should be translated &#8220;rebellious&#8221; (cf. NASB, NIV &#8220;rebellious and defiled&#8221;). This idea is supported by v. 2. For discussion of the two options, see <i>HALOTi> 630 s.v. I <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1502;&#1512;&#1488;font> and J. J. M. Roberts, <i>Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniahi> (OTL), 206.

(0.20)(Lam 1:9)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;uncleanness.&#8221; The noun <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1496;&#1467;&#1502;&#1456;&#1488;&#1464;&#1492;font> (<font face="Scholar">tumfont>&#8217;<font face="Scholar">ahfont>, &#8220;uncleanness&#8221;) refers in general to the state of ritual uncleanness and specifically to (1) sexual uncleanness (Num 5:19); (2) filthy mass (Ezek 24:11; 2 Chr 29:16); (3) ritual uncleanness (Lev 16:16, 19; Ezek 22:15; 24:13; 36:25, 29; 39:24; Zech 13:2); (4) menstrual uncleanness (Lev 15:25, 26, 30; 18:19; Ezek 36:17); (5) polluted meat (Judg 13:7, 14). Here, Jerusalem is personified as a woman whose menstrual uncleanness has soiled even her own clothes; this is a picture of the consequences of the sin of Jerusalem: uncleanness = her sin, and soiling her own clothes = consequences of sin. The poet may also be mixing metaphors allowing various images (of shame) to circulate in the hearer&#8217;s mind, including rape and public exposure. By not again mentioning sin directly (a topic relatively infrequent in this book), the poet lays a general acknowledgment of sin in 1:8 alongside an exceptionally vivid picture of the horrific circumstances which have come to be. It is no simplistic explanation that sin merits such inhumane treatment. Instead 1:9 insists that no matter the legal implications of being guilty, the Lord should be motivated to aid Jerusalem (and therefore her people) because her obscene reality is so revolting.