Results 1 - 6 of 6 for enforced (0.000 seconds)
(1.00)(Exo 31:6)

tn The expression uses the independent personal pronoun (“and I”) with the deictic particle (“behold”) to enforce the subject of the verb – “and I, indeed I have given.”

(0.67)(Job 21:17)

tn The pronominal suffix is objective; it re-enforces the object of the preposition, &#8220;upon them.&#8221; The verb in the clause is <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1489;&#1468;&#1493;&#1465;&#1488;font> (<font face="Scholar">bofont>&#8217;) followed by <i><font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1506;&#1463;&#1500;font>i> (&#8217;<font face="Scholar">alfont>), &#8220;come upon [or against],&#8221; may be interpreted as meaning attack or strike.

(0.67)(Pro 28:1)

sn The righteous, who seek to find favor with God and man, have a clear conscience and do not need to look over their shoulders for avengers or law enforcers. Their position is one of confidence, so that they do not flee.

(0.67)(Mal 3:1)

sn This <i>messenger of the covenanti> may be equated with <i>my messengeri> (that is, Elijah) mentioned earlier in the verse, or with <i>the Lordi> himself. In either case the messenger functions as an enforcer of the covenant. Note the following verses, which depict purifying judgment on a people that has violated the Lord&#8217;s covenant.

(0.58)(Lam 1:3)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;great servitude.&#8221; The noun <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1506;&#1458;&#1489;&#1465;&#1491;&#1464;&#1492;font> (&#8217;<font face="Scholar">avodahfont>, &#8220;servitude&#8221;) refers to the enforced labor and suffering inflicted upon conquered peoples who are subjugated into slavery (Exod 1:14; 2:23; 5:9, 11; 6:9; Deut 26:6; 1 Kgs 12:4; 1 Chr 26:30; 2 Chr 10:4; 12:8; Isa 14:3; Lam 1:3).

(0.42)(Num 5:18)

tn The expression has been challenged. The first part, &#8220;bitter water,&#8221; has been thought to mean &#8220;water of contention&#8221; (so NEB), but this is not convincing. It has some support in the versions which read &#8220;contention&#8221; and &#8220;testing,&#8221; no doubt trying to fit the passage better. N. H. Snaith (<i>Leviticus and Numbersi> [NCB], 129) suggests from an Arabic word that it was designed to cause an abortion &#8211; but that would raise an entirely different question, one of who the father of a child was. And that has not been introduced here. The water was &#8220;bitter&#8221; in view of the consequences it held for her if she was proven to be guilty. That is then enforced by the wordplay with the last word, the Piel participle <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1492;&#1463;&#1502;&#1456;&#1488;&#1464;&#1512;&#1458;&#1512;&#1460;&#1497;&#1501;font> (<font face="Scholar">hamfont>&#8217;<font face="Scholar">ararimfont>). The bitter water, if it convicted her, would pronounce a curse on her. So she was literally holding her life in her hands.