Results 1 - 15 of 15 for den (0.000 seconds)
(1.00)(Psa 10:9)

tn Or “in its den.”

(0.63)(Nah 2:11)

tn Or “What has become of the den of the lions?”

(0.50)(Jer 7:11)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;Is this house&#8230;a den/cave of robbers in your eyes?&#8221;

(0.50)(Dan 6:16)

sn The <i>deni> was perhaps a pit below ground level which could be safely observed from above.

(0.44)(Dan 6:17)

sn The purpose of the den being <i>sealedi> was to prevent unauthorized tampering with the opening of the den. Any disturbance of the seal would immediately alert the officials to improper activity of this sort.

(0.44)(Dan 6:24)

tc The LXX specifies only the two overseers, together with their families, as those who were cast into the lions&#8217; den.

(0.31)(Pro 7:27)

tn &#8220;Chambers&#8221; is a hypocatastasis, comparing the place of death or the grave with a bedroom in the house. It plays on the subtlety of the temptation. Cf. NLT &#8220;Her bedroom is the den of death.&#8221;

(0.31)(Isa 11:8)

tc The Hebrew text has the otherwise unattested <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1502;&#1456;&#1488;&#1493;&#1468;&#1512;&#1463;&#1514;font> (<font face="Scholar">m&#255;font>&#8217;<font face="Scholar">uratfont>, &#8220;place of light&#8221;), i.e., opening of a hole. Some prefer to emend to <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1502;&#1456;&#1506;&#1464;&#1512;&#1463;&#1514;font> (<font face="Scholar">m&#255;font>&#8217;<font face="Scholar">aratfont>, &#8220;cave, den&#8221;).

(0.22)(Mat 21:13)

sn A quotation from Jer 7:11. The meaning of Jesus&#8217; statement about making the temple courts <i>a den of robbersi> probably operates here at two levels. Not only were the religious leaders robbing the people financially, but because of this they had also robbed them spiritually by stealing from them the opportunity to come to know God genuinely. It is possible that these merchants had recently been moved to this location for convenience.

(0.22)(Mar 11:17)

sn A quotation from Jer 7:11. The meaning of Jesus&#8217; statement about making the temple courts <i>a den of robbersi> probably operates here at two levels. Not only were the religious leaders robbing the people financially, but because of this they had also robbed them spiritually by stealing from them the opportunity to come to know God genuinely. It is possible that these merchants had recently been moved to this location for convenience.

(0.22)(Luk 19:46)

sn A quotation from Jer 7:11. The meaning of Jesus&#8217; statement about making the temple courts <i>a den of robbersi> probably operates here at two levels. Not only were the religious leaders robbing the people financially, but because of this they had also robbed them spiritually by stealing from them the opportunity to come to know God genuinely. It is possible that these merchants had recently been moved to this location for convenience.

(0.16)(Job 4:10)

sn Eliphaz takes up a new image here to make the point that the wicked are destroyed &#8211; the breaking up and scattering of a den of lions. There are several words for &#8220;lion&#8221; used in this section. D. J. A. Clines observes that it is probably impossible to distinguish them (<i>Jobi> [WBC], 109, 110, which records some bibliography of those who have tried to work on the etymologies and meanings). The first is <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1488;&#1463;&#1512;&#1456;&#1497;&#1461;&#1492;font> (&#8217;<font face="Scholar">aryehfont>) the generic term for &#8220;lion.&#8221; It is followed by <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1513;&#1473;&#1463;&#1495;&#1463;&#1500;font> (<font face="Scholar">shakhalfont>) which, like <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1499;&#1468;&#1456;&#1508;&#1460;&#1497;&#1512;font> (<font face="Scholar">k&#255;firfont>), is a &#8220;young lion.&#8221; Some have thought that the <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1513;&#1473;&#1463;&#1495;&#1463;&#1500;font> (<font face="Scholar">shakhalfont>) is a lion-like animal, perhaps a panther or leopard. KBL takes it by metathesis from Arabic &#8220;young one.&#8221; The LXX for this verse has &#8220;the strength of the lion, and the voice of the lioness and the exulting cry of serpents are quenched.&#8221;

(0.12)(Exo 16:15)

tn The text has: <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1502;&#1464;&#1503; &#1492;&#1493;&#1468;&#1488; &#1499;&#1468;&#1460;&#1497; &#1500;&#1488;&#1465; &#1497;&#1464;&#1491;&#1456;&#1506;&#1493;&#1468; &#1502;&#1463;&#1492;&#1470;&#1492;&#1493;&#1468;&#1488;font> (<font face="Scholar">man hufont>&#8217; <font face="Scholar">ki lofont>&#8217; <font face="Scholar">yad&#255;font>&#8217;<font face="Scholar">u mah hufont>&#8217;). From this statement the name &#8220;manna&#8221; was given to the substance. <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1502;&#1464;&#1503;font> for &#8220;what&#8221; is not found in Hebrew, but appears in Syriac as a contraction of <i>ma deni>, &#8220;what then?&#8221; In Aramaic and Arabic <font face="Scholar">manfont> is &#8220;what?&#8221; The word is used here apparently for the sake of etymology. B. S. Childs (<i>Exodusi> [OTL], 274) follows the approach that any connections to words that actually meant &#8220;what?&#8221; are unnecessary, for it is a play on the name (whatever it may have been) and therefore related only by sound to the term being explained. This, however, presumes that a substance was known prior to this account &#8211; a point that Deuteronomy does not seem to allow. S. R. Driver says that it is not known how early the contraction came into use, but that this verse seems to reflect it (<i>Exodusi>, 149). Probably one must simply accept that in the early Israelite period <i>mani> meant &#8220;what?&#8221; There seems to be sufficient evidence to support this. See <i>EAi> 286,5; <i>UTi> 435; <i>DNWSIi> 1:157.

(0.12)(Nah 2:11)

tc The Masoretic form <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1493;&#1468;&#1502;&#1460;&#1512;&#1456;&#1506;&#1462;&#1492;font> (<font face="Scholar">umirfont>&#8217;<font face="Scholar">ehfont>, &#8220;the feeding ground&#8221;) is supported by the Dead Sea Scrolls: <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1493;&#1502;&#1512;&#1506;&#1492;font> (4QpNah). It is also reflected in the LXX reading <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#7969; &#957;&#959;&#956;&#8053;font> (<font face="Greektl">Je nomhfont>, &#8220;the pasture&#8221;). The <i>BHSi> editors suggest emending to <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1493;&#1468;&#1502;&#1456;&#1506;&#1464;&#1512;&#1464;&#1492;font> (<font face="Scholar">um&#255;font>&#8217;<font face="Scholar">arahfont>, &#8220;the cave&#8221;), which involves the metathesis of <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1512;font> (<font face="Scholar">reshfont>) and <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1506;font> (<font face="Scholar">ayinfont>). This proposed emendation is designed to create a tighter parallelism with <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1502;&#1456;&#1506;&#1493;&#1465;&#1503;font> (<font face="Scholar">m&#255;font>&#8217;<font face="Scholar">onfont>, &#8220;the den&#8221;) in the preceding line. However, this emendation has no textual support and conflicts with the grammar of the rest of the line: the feminine noun <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1493;&#1468;&#1502;&#1456;&#1506;&#1464;&#1512;&#1464;&#1492;font> (<font face="Scholar">um&#255;font>&#8217;<font face="Scholar">arahfont>, &#8220;the cave&#8221;) would demand a feminine independent pronoun instead of the masculine independent pronoun <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1492;&#1493;&#1468;&#1488;font> which follows. Nevertheless, several English versions adopt the emendation (NJB, NEB, RSV, NRSV), while others follow the reading of the MT (KJV, NASB, NIV, NJPS).

(0.08)(Sos 5:4)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;hole.&#8221; Probably &#8220;latch-hole&#8221; or &#8220;key-hole,&#8221; but possibly a euphemism (<i>double entendrei>). The noun <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1495;&#1465;&#1512;font> (<font face="Scholar">khorfont>, &#8220;hole&#8221;) is used in OT in a literal and metaphorical sense: (1) literal sense: hole bored in the lid of a chest (2 Kgs 12:10); hole in a wall (Ezek 8:7); hole in the ground or cave used as hiding places for men (1 Sam 13:6; 14:11; Isa 42:23); hole in the ground, as the dwelling place of an asp (Isa 11:8); and a hole in a mountain, as the den of lions (Nah 2:13); and (2) figurative sense: hole of an eye (metonymy of association), that is, eye-socket (Zech 14:12) (<i>HALOTi> 348 s.v. II <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1495;&#1465;&#1512;font>; BDB 359 s.v. III <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1495;&#1465;&#1512;font>). While the meaning of <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1495;&#1465;&#1512;font> in Song 5:4 is clear &#8211; &#8220;hole&#8221; &#8211; there is a debate whether it is used in a literal or figurative sense. (1) Literal sense: The lexicons suggest that it denotes &#8220;hole of a door, that is, key-hole or latch-opening&#8221; (<i>HALOTi> 348; BDB 359). Most commentators suggest that it refers to a hole bored through the bedroom door to provide access to the latch or lock. The mention in 5:5 of <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1499;&#1468;&#1463;&#1508;&#1468;&#1493;&#1465;&#1514; &#1492;&#1463;&#1502;&#1468;&#1463;&#1504;&#1456;&#1506;&#1493;&#1468;&#1500;font> (<font face="Scholar">kaffot hammanfont>&#8217;<font face="Scholar">ulfont>, &#8220;latches of the door-bolt&#8221;) suggests that the term refers to some kind of opening associated with the latch of the bedroom door. This approach is followed by most translations: &#8220;the hole in the door&#8221; (JB), &#8220;the latch-hole&#8221; (NEB), &#8220;the latch-opening&#8221; (NIV), &#8220;the latch-hole&#8221; (NEB), &#8220;the latch&#8221; (RSV, NJPS), and &#8220;the opening of the door&#8221; (KJV). The assumption that the hole in question was a latch-hole in the door is reflected in Midrash Rabbah: Rabbi Abba ben Kahana said, &#8220;Why is the hole of the door mentioned here, seeing that it is a place where vermin swarm?&#8221; The situation envisaged by his actions are often depicted thus: In ancient Near Eastern villages, the bolting systems of doors utilized door-bolts and keys made of wood. The keys were often stored either on the outside (!) or inside of the door. If the key was placed on the inside of the door, a small hole was bored through the door so that a person could reach through the hole with the key to unlock the door. The key was often over a foot in length, and the keyhole large enough for a man&#8217;s hand. Apparently, he extended his hand through the hole from the outside to try to unbolt the door latch on the inside. He could put his hand through the hole, but could not open the door without the key. (2) Figurative sense: Because of the presence of several erotic motifs in 5:2-8 and the possibility that a <i>double entendrei> is present (see notes below), several scholars suggest that the term is a euphemism for the female vagina (<i>HALOTi> 348). They suggest that <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1495;&#1465;&#1512;font> (&#8220;hole&#8221;) is the female counterpart for the euphemistic usage of <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1497;&#1464;&#1491;font> (&#8220;hand&#8221;) in 5:4. See A. S. Cook, <i>The Root of the Thing: A Study of Job and the Song of Songsi>, 110, 123; Cheryl Exum, &#8220;A Literary and Structural Analysis of the Song of Songs,&#8221; <i>ZAWi> 85 (1973): 50-51; M. H. Pope, <i>Song of Songsi> (AB), 518-19.