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(0.30) (2Ch 30:8)

tn Heb “so that the rage of his anger might turn from you.” The jussive with vav conjunctive indicates purpose/result after the preceding imperative.

(0.30) (Job 9:13)

sn The meaning of the line is that God’s anger will continue until it has accomplished its purpose (23:13-14).

(0.30) (Job 16:9)

tn The referent of these pronouns in v. 9 (“his anger…he has gnashed…his teeth…his eyes”) is best taken as God.

(0.30) (Job 32:2)

tn The verse begins with וַיִּחַר אַף (vayyikharaf, “and the anger became hot”), meaning Elihu became very angry.

(0.30) (Job 32:2)

tn The second comment about Elihu’s anger comes right before the statement of its cause. Now the perfect verb is used: “he was angry.”

(0.30) (Psa 78:50)

tn Heb “he leveled a path for his anger.” There were no obstacles to impede its progress; it moved swiftly and destructively.

(0.30) (Pro 19:11)

tn The Hiphil perfect of אָרַךְ (’arakh, “to be long”) means “to make long; to prolong.” Patience and slowness to anger lead to forgiveness of sins.

(0.30) (Pro 27:4)

tn Heb “fierceness of wrath and outpouring [= flood] of anger.” A number of English versions use “flood” here (e.g., NASB, NCV, NLT).

(0.30) (Pro 30:33)

sn There is a subtle wordplay here with the word for anger: It is related to the word for nose in the preceding colon.

(0.30) (Isa 9:21)

tn Heb “in all this his anger is not turned, and still his hand is outstretched” (KJV and ASV both similar); NIV “his hand is still upraised.”

(0.30) (Isa 10:4)

tn Heb “in all this his anger was not turned, and still his hand was outstretched”; KJV, ASV, NRSV “his had is stretched out still.”

(0.30) (Isa 10:5)

tn Heb “Woe [to] Assyria, the club of my anger.” On הוֹי (hoy, “woe, ah”) see the note on the first phrase of 1:4.

(0.30) (Isa 14:6)

tn Heb “it was ruling in anger nations [with] oppression without restraint.” The participle (“ruling”) suggests repeated or continuous action in past time.

(0.30) (Isa 63:3)

sn Nations, headed by Edom, are the object of the Lord’s anger (see v. 6). He compares military slaughter to stomping on grapes in a vat.

(0.30) (Isa 66:15)

tn Heb “to cause to return with the rage of his anger, and his battle cry [or “rebuke”] with flames of fire.”

(0.30) (Jer 12:13)

tn Heb “be disappointed in their harvests from the fierce anger of the Lord.” The translation makes explicit what is implicit in the elliptical poetry of the Hebrew original.

(0.30) (Jer 51:45)

sn Compare Jer 50:8-10; 51:6 where the significance of saving oneself from the fierce anger of the Lord is clarified.

(0.30) (Lam 2:1)

sn Chapter 2 continues the use of feminine epithets (e.g., “Daughter Zion”), although initially portraying Jerusalem as an object destroyed by the angered enemy, God.

(0.30) (Jon 4:1)

tn Heb “it burned to him.” The verb חָרָה (kharah, “to burn”) functions figuratively here (hypocatastasis) referring to anger (BDB 354 s.v. חָרָה). It is related to the noun חֲרוֹן (kharon, “heat/burning”) in the phrase “the heat of his anger” in 3:9. The repetition of the root highlights the contrast in attitudes between Jonah and God: God’s burning anger “cooled off” when the Ninevites repented, but Jonah’s anger was “kindled” when God did not destroy Nineveh.

(0.30) (Act 4:25)

sn The Greek word translated rage includes not only anger but opposition, both verbal and nonverbal. See L&N 88.185.



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