Results 21 - 40 of 180 for Poor (0.000 seconds)
(0.35)(Lev 19:15)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;You shall not lift up faces of poor [people] and you shall not honor faces of great.&#8221;

(0.35)(Pro 21:13)

sn &#8220;Cry&#8221; here would be a metonymy of effect for the cause, the cause being the great needs of the poor.

(0.35)(Pro 28:27)

sn The generous individual will be rewarded. He will not lack nor miss what he has given away to the poor.

(0.35)(Isa 32:7)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;to ruin the poor with words of falsehood, even when the needy speak what is just.&#8221;

(0.35)(Eze 18:17)

tc This translation follows the LXX. The MT reads &#8220;restrains his hand from the poor,&#8221; which makes no sense here.

(0.35)(Jam 2:6)

tn This is singular: &#8220;the poor person,&#8221; perhaps referring to the hypothetical one described in vv. 2-3.

(0.35)(Pro 10:15)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;the ruin of the poor.&#8221; The term <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1491;&#1468;&#1463;&#1500;&#1468;&#1460;&#1497;&#1501;font> (<font face="Scholar">dalimfont>, &#8220;of the poor&#8221;) functions as an objective genitive. Poverty leads to the ruin of the poor. The term &#8220;ruin&#8221; includes the shambles in which the person lives. This provides no security but only the fear of ruin. This proverb is an observation on life.

(0.31)(Pro 28:3)

tc The MT reads &#8220;a poor man,&#8221; <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1490;&#1468;&#1462;&#1489;&#1462;&#1512; &#1512;&#1464;&#1513;&#1473;font> (<font face="Scholar">gever rashfont>); cf. KJV, NASB, NLT. The problem is that the poor in the book of Proverbs is not an oppressor and does not have the power to be such. So commentators assume the word is incorrect. By a slight change to <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1512;&#1464;&#1513;&#1473;&#1464;&#1506;font> (<font face="Scholar">rashafont>&#8217;) the reading becomes &#8220;a wicked ruler&#8221; [<i>Hebi> &#8220;a wicked mighty man&#8221;]. There is no textual support for this change. The LXX, however, reads, &#8220;A courageous man oppresses the poor with impieties.&#8221; If &#8220;a poor man&#8221; is retained, then the oppression would include betrayal &#8211; one would expect a poor man to have sympathy for others who are impoverished, but in fact that is not the case. It is a sad commentary on human nature that the truly oppressed people can also be oppressed by other poor people.

(0.30)(Pro 28:27)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;hides his eyes&#8221;; &#8220;to them&#8221; is supplied in the translation to indicate the link with the poor in the preceding line. Hiding or closing the eyes is a metonymy of cause or of adjunct, indicating a decision not to look on and thereby help the poor. It could also be taken as an implied comparison, i.e., not helping the poor is like closing the eyes to them.

(0.30)(Psa 102:14)

tn The Poel of <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1495;&#1464;&#1504;&#1463;&#1503;font> (<font face="Scholar">khananfont>) occurs only here and in Prov 14:21, where it refers to having compassion on the poor.

(0.30)(Pro 31:5)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;all the children of poverty.&#8221; This expression refers to the poor by nature. Cf. KJV, NASB, NRSV &#8220;the afflicted&#8221;; NIV &#8220;oppressed.&#8221;

(0.30)(Jer 5:4)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;Surely they are poor.&#8221; The translation is intended to make clear the explicit contrasts and qualifications drawn in this verse and the next.

(0.30)(Zep 3:12)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;needy and poor people.&#8221; The terms often refer to a socioeconomic group, but here they may refer to those who are humble in a spiritual sense.

(0.30)(Act 24:17)

tn <i>Grki> &#8220;to bring alms,&#8221; but the term &#8220;alms&#8221; is not in common use today, so the closest modern equivalent, &#8220;gifts for the poor,&#8221; is used instead.

(0.30)(Gal 2:10)

tn <i>Grki> &#8220;only that we remember the poor&#8221;; the words &#8220;They requested&#8221; have been supplied from the context to make a complete English sentence.

(0.28)(Job 24:9)

tc The MT has a very brief and strange reading: &#8220;they take as a pledge upon the poor.&#8221; This could be taken as &#8220;they take a pledge against the poor&#8221; (ESV). Kamphausen suggested that instead of <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1506;&#1463;&#1500;font> (&#8217;<font face="Scholar">alfont>, &#8220;against&#8221;) one should read <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1506;&#1493;&#1468;&#1500;font> (&#8217;<font face="Scholar">ulfont>, &#8220;suckling&#8221;). This is supported by the parallelism. &#8220;They take as pledge&#8221; is also made passive here.

(0.28)(Psa 41:1)

sn <i>One who treats the poor properlyi>. The psalmist is characterizing himself as such an individual and supplying a reason why God has responded favorably to his prayer. The Lord&#8217;s attitude toward the merciful mirrors their treatment of the poor.

(0.28)(Pro 10:4)

tc The MT reads <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1512;&#1464;&#1488;&#1513;&#1473;font> (<font face="Scholar">rafont>&#8217;<font face="Scholar">shfont>, &#8220;poor&#8221;) which is the plene spelling of <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1512;&#1464;&#1513;&#1473;font> (<font face="Scholar">rashfont>, &#8220;poor [person]&#8221;; <i>HALOTi> 1229-30 s.v. <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1512;&#1461;&#1497;&#1513;&#1473;font>). Both <i>Tgi>. Prov 10:4 and LXX reflect an alternate vocalization <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1512;&#1460;&#1497;&#1513;&#1473;font> (<font face="Scholar">rishfont>, &#8220;poverty&#8221;) which is from the same root, and essentially means the same thing.

(0.28)(Pro 13:7)

tn The Hitpolel of <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1512;&#1493;&#1468;&#1513;&#1473;font> (<font face="Scholar">rushfont>, &#8220;to be poor&#8221;) means &#8220;to pretend to be poor&#8221; (BDB 930 s.v. Hithpolel); this is another example of the &#8220;Hollywood Hitpael&#8221; &#8211; the Hitpolel forms of hollow root verbs are the equivalent of Hitpael stem forms.

(0.28)(Pro 19:4)

sn This proverb simply makes an observation on life: People pursue wealthy folk hoping that they can gain something from the rich, but the poor are deserted even by friends, who fear that the poor will try to gain something from them.