Results 61 - 80 of 100 for Fair Havens (0.000 seconds)
(0.19)(2Ch 8:13)

tn The Hebrew phrase <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1492;&#1463;&#1505;&#1468;&#1467;&#1499;&#1468;&#1493;&#1465;&#1514;font>[<font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1495;&#1463;&#1490;font>] (<font face="Scholar">khag hassukotfont>, &#8220;[festival of] huts&#8221; [or &#8220;shelters&#8221;]) is traditionally known as the Feast of Tabernacles. The rendering &#8220;booths&#8221; (cf. NAB, NASB, NRSV) is probably better than the traditional &#8220;tabernacles&#8221; in light of the meaning of the term <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1505;&#1467;&#1499;&#1468;&#1464;&#1492;font> (<font face="Scholar">sukkahfont>, &#8220;hut; booth&#8221;), but &#8220;booths&#8221; are frequently associated with trade shows and craft fairs in contemporary American English. The nature of the celebration during this feast as a commemoration of the wanderings of the Israelites after they left Egypt suggests that a translation like &#8220;temporary shelters&#8221; is more appropriate.

(0.19)(Ezr 3:4)

tn The Hebrew phrase <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1488;&#1462;&#1514; &#1495;&#1463;&#1490;&#1470;&#1492;&#1463;&#1505;&#1468;&#1467;&#1499;&#1468;&#1493;&#1465;&#1514;font> (&#8217;<font face="Scholar">et khag-hassukotfont>, &#8220;festival of huts&#8221; [or &#8220;shelters&#8221;]) is traditionally known as the Feast of Tabernacles. The rendering &#8220;booths&#8221; (cf. NAB, NASB, NRSV) is probably better than the traditional &#8220;tabernacles&#8221; in light of the meaning of the term <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1505;&#1467;&#1499;&#1468;&#1464;&#1492;font> (<font face="Scholar">sukkahfont>, &#8220;hut; booth&#8221;), but &#8220;booths&#8221; are frequently associated with trade shows and craft fairs in contemporary American English. The nature of the celebration during this feast as a commemoration of the wanderings of the Israelites after they left Egypt suggests that a translation like &#8220;temporary shelters&#8221; is more appropriate.

(0.19)(Job 8:22)

sn These verses show several points of similarity with the style of the Book of Psalms. &#8220;Those who hate you&#8221; and the &#8220;evil-doers&#8221; are fairly common words to describe the ungodly in the Psalms. &#8220;Those who hate you&#8221; are enemies of the righteous man because of the parallelism in the verse. By this line Bildad is showing Job that he and his friends are not among those who are his enemies, and that Job himself is really among the righteous. It is an appealing way to end the discourse. See further G. W. Anderson, &#8220;Enemies and Evil-doers in the Book of Psalms,&#8221; <i>BJRLi> 48 (1965/66): 18-29.

(0.19)(Jer 51:26)

tn This is a fairly literal translation of the original which reads &#8220;No one will take from you a stone for a cornerstone nor a stone for foundations.&#8221; There is no unanimity of opinion in the commentaries, many feeling that the figure of the burned mountain continues and others feeling that the figure here shifts to a burned city whose stones are so burned that they are useless to be used in building. The latter is the interpretation adopted here (see, e.g., F. B. Huey, <i>Jeremiah, Lamentationsi> [NAC], 423; W. L. Holladay, <i>Jeremiahi> [Hermeneia], 2:426; NCV).

(0.19)(Luk 1:31)

sn <i>You will name him Jesus.i> This verse reflects the birth announcement of a major figure; see 1:13; Gen 16:7; Judg 13:5; Isa 7:14. The Greek form of the name <font face="Greektl">Ihsousfont>, which was translated into Latin as <i>Jesusi>, is the same as the Hebrew <font face="Scholar">Yeshuafont> (Joshua), which means &#8220;Yahweh saves&#8221; (Yahweh is typically rendered as &#8220;Lord&#8221; in the OT). It was a fairly common name among Jews in 1st century Palestine, as references to a number of people by this name in the LXX and Josephus indicate.

(0.19)(Act 9:31)

tn Or &#8220;Built up.&#8221; The participle <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#959;&#7984;&#954;&#959;&#948;&#959;&#956;&#959;&#965;&#956;&#941;&#957;&#951;font> (<font face="Greektl">oikodomoumenhfont>) has been translated as a participle of result related to <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#949;&#7990;&#967;&#949;&#957;font> (<font face="Greektl">eicenfont>). It could also be understood as adverbial to <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#7952;&#960;&#955;&#951;&#952;&#973;&#957;&#949;&#964;&#959;font> (<font face="Greektl">eplhqunetofont>): &#8220;Then the church throughout Judea, Galilee, and Samaria experienced peace. Strengthened and living in the fear of the Lord and in the encouragement of the Holy Spirit, it increased in numbers.&#8221; Although some scholars do not regard the participle of result as a legitimate category, it is actually fairly common (see <i>ExSyni> 637-39).

(0.19)(Gal 6:12)

tc &#8225; <i>Grki> &#8220;so that they will not be persecuted.&#8221; The indicative after <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#7989;&#957;&#945; &#956;&#8053;font> (<font face="Greektl">Jina mhfont>) is unusual (though not unexampled elsewhere in the NT), making it the harder reading. The evidence is fairly evenly split between the indicative <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#948;&#953;&#8061;&#954;&#959;&#957;&#964;&#945;&#953;font> (<font face="Greektl">diwkontaifont>; <font face="Greek Uncials">&#204;font><sup>46sup> A C F G K L P 0278 6 81 104 326 629 1175 1505 <i>pmi>) and the subjunctive <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#948;&#953;&#8061;&#954;&#969;&#957;&#964;&#945;&#953;font> (<font face="Greektl">diwkwntaifont>; <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1488;font> B D <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#936;font> 33 365 1739 <i>pmi>), with a slight preference for the subjunctive. However, since scribes would tend to change the indicative to a subjunctive due to syntactical requirements, the internal evidence is decidedly on the side of the indicative, suggesting that it is original.

(0.18)(Exo 30:11)

sn This brief section has been interpreted a number of ways by biblical scholars (for a good survey and discussion, see B. Jacob, <i>Exodusi>, 829-35). In this context the danger of erecting and caring for a sanctuary may have been in view. A census would be taken to count the losses and to cover the danger of coming into such proximity with the holy place; payment was made to ransom the lives of the people numbered so that they would not die. The money collected would then be used for the care of the sanctuary. The principle was fairly straightforward: Those numbered among the redeemed of the <sc>Lordsc> were to support the work of the <sc>Lordsc> to maintain their fellowship with the covenant. The passage is fairly easy to outline: I. Every covenant member must give a ransom for his life to avoid death (11-12); II. The ransom is the same for all, whether rich or poor (13-15); and III. The ransom money supports the sanctuary as a memorial for the ransomed (16).

(0.16)(Num 10:2)

sn The instructions are not clearly spelled out here. But the trumpets were to be made of silver ingots beaten out into a sheet of silver and then bent to form a trumpet. There is archaeological evidence of silver smelting as early as 3000 <sc>b.c.sc> Making silver trumpets would have been a fairly easy thing for the Israelites to do. The trumpet would have been straight, with a tapered form, very unlike the &#8220;ram&#8217;s horn&#8221; (<font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1513;&#1473;&#1493;&#1465;&#1508;&#1464;&#1512;font>, <font face="Scholar">shofarfont>). The trumpets were used by the priests in Israel from the outset, but later were used more widely. The sound would be sharp and piercing, but limited in scope to a few notes. See further C. Sachs, <i>The History of Musical Instrumentsi>.

(0.16)(Deu 16:13)

tn The Hebrew phrase <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1495;&#1463;&#1490; &#1492;&#1463;&#1505;&#1468;&#1467;&#1499;&#1468;&#1465;&#1514;font> (<font face="Scholar">khagfont> <font face="Scholar">hassukotfont>, &#8220;festival of huts&#8221; or &#8220;festival of shelters&#8221;) is traditionally known as the Feast of Tabernacles. The rendering &#8220;booths&#8221; (cf. NAB, NASB, NRSV) is now preferable to the traditional &#8220;tabernacles&#8221; (KJV, ASV, NIV) in light of the meaning of the term <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1505;&#1467;&#1499;&#1468;&#1464;&#1492;font> (<font face="Scholar">sukkahfont>, &#8220;hut; booth&#8221;), but &#8220;booths&#8221; are frequently associated with trade shows and craft fairs in contemporary American English. Clearer is the English term &#8220;shelters&#8221; (so NCV, TEV, CEV, NLT), but this does not reflect the temporary nature of the living arrangement. This feast was a commemoration of the wanderings of the Israelites after they left Egypt, suggesting that a translation like &#8220;temporary shelters&#8221; is more appropriate.

(0.16)(Pro 25:4)

tn The Hebrew <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1499;&#1468;&#1462;&#1500;&#1460;&#1497;font> (<font face="Scholar">kelifont>) means &#8220;vessel; utensil&#8221; (cf. KJV, ASV, NASB). But purging dross from silver does not produce a &#8220;vessel&#8221; for the silversmith. Some versions therefore render it &#8220;material&#8221; (e.g., NIV, NRSV). The LXX says &#8220;that it will be entirely pure.&#8221; So D. W. Thomas reads <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1499;&#1468;&#1464;&#1500;&#1460;&#1497;&#1500;font> (<font face="Scholar">kalilfont>) and translates it &#8220;purified completely&#8221; (&#8220;Notes on Some Passages in the Book of Proverbs,&#8221; <i>VTi> 15 [1965]: 271-79; cf. NAB). W. McKane simply rearranges the line to say that the smith can produce a work of art (<i>Proverbsi> [OTL], 580; cf. TEV &#8220;a thing of beauty&#8221;). The easiest explanation is that &#8220;vessel&#8221; is a metonymy of effect, &#8220;vessel&#8221; put for the material that goes into making it (such metonymies occur fairly often in Psalms and Proverbs).

(0.16)(Pro 27:10)

sn The meaning of the verse is very difficult, although the translation is rather straightforward. It may simply be saying that people should retain family relationships but will discover that a friend who is available is better than a relative who is not. But C. H. Toy thinks that the verse is made up of three lines that have no connection: 10a instructs people to maintain relationships, 10b says not to go to a brother&#8217;s house [only?] when disaster strikes, and 10c observes that a nearby friend is better than a far-away relative. C. H. Toy suggests a connection may have been there, but has been lost (<i>Proverbsi> [ICC], 485-86). The conflict between 17:17 and 10b may be another example of presenting two sides of the issue, a fairly frequent occurrence in the book of Proverbs.

(0.16)(Pro 29:10)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;and the upright seek his life.&#8221; There are two ways this second line can be taken. (1) One can see it as a continuation of the first line, meaning that the bloodthirsty men also &#8220;seek the life of the upright&#8221; (cf. NIV, NRSV). The difficulty is that the suffix is singular but the apparent referent is plural. (2) One can take it is as a contrast: &#8220;but as for the upright, they seek his life&#8221; &#8211; a fairly straightforward rendering (cf. ASV). The difficulty here is that &#8220;seeking a life&#8221; is normally a hostile act, but it would here be positive: &#8220;seeking&#8221; a life to preserve it. The verse would then say that the bloodthirsty hate the innocent, but the righteous protect them (W. McKane, <i>Proverbsi> [OTL], 637; cf. NAB, NASB, TEV).

(0.16)(Jer 47:1)

sn The precise dating of this prophecy is uncertain. Several proposals have been suggested, the most likely of which is that the prophecy was delivered in 609 <sc>b.c.sc> in conjunction with Pharaoh Necho&#8217;s advance into Palestine to aid the Assyrians. That was the same year that Josiah was killed by Necho at the battle of Megiddo and four years before Necho was defeated by Nebuchadnezzar, the foe from the north. The prophecy presupposes that Ashkelon is still in existence (v. 5) hence it must be before 604 <sc>b.csc>. For a fairly complete discussion of the options see G. L. Keown, P. J. Scalise, T. G. Smothers, <i>Jeremiah 26-52i> (WBC), 299-300.

(0.16)(Mar 7:24)

tc Most <sc>msssc>, including early and important witnesses (<font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1488;font> A B <font face="Greek Uncials">&#203;font><sup>1,13sup> 33 2427 <font face="Greek Uncials">&#207;font> lat), have here <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#954;&#945;&#8054; &#931;&#953;&#948;&#8182;&#957;&#959;&#962;font> (<font face="Greektl">kai Sidwno&quot;font>, &#8220;and Sidon&#8221;). The Western text, as well as several other important <sc>msssc> (D L W <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#916;font> <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#920;font> 28 565 it), lack the words. Although the external evidence is on the side of inclusion, it is difficult to explain why scribes would omit the mention of Sidon. On the other hand, the parallels in v. 31 and Matt 15:21 would be sufficient motivation for scribes to add Sidon here. Furthermore, every other mention of Tyre in the Gospels is accompanied by Sidon, putting pressure on scribes to conform this text as well. The shorter reading therefore, though without compelling external evidence on its side, is strongly supported by internal evidence, rendering judgment on its authenticity fairly certain.

(0.16)(Act 3:6)

tc The words &#8220;stand up and&#8221; (<font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#7956;&#947;&#949;&#953;&#961;&#949; &#954;&#945;&#943;font>, <font face="Greektl">egeire kaifont>) are not in a few <sc>msssc> (<font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1488;font> B D sa), but are included in A C E <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#936;font> 095 33 1739 <font face="Greek Uncials">&#207;font> lat sy mae bo. The external testimony is thus fairly evenly divided, with few but important representatives of the Alexandrian and Western texttypes supporting the shorter reading. Internally, the words look like a standard scribal emendation, and may have been motivated by other healing passages where Jesus gave a similar double command (cf. Matt 9:5; Mark 2:9, [11]; Luke 5:23; [6:8]; John 5:8). On the other hand, there is some motivation for deleting <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#7956;&#947;&#949;&#953;&#961;&#949; &#954;&#945;&#943;font> here, namely, unlike Jesus&#8217; healing miracles, Peter raises (<font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#7972;&#947;&#949;&#953;&#961;&#949;&#957;font>, <font face="Greektl">hgeirenfont>) the man to his feet (v. 7) rather than the man rising on his own. In light of the scribal tendency to harmonize, especially in immediate context, the longer reading is slightly preferred.

(0.16)(2Th 2:3)

tc Most <sc>msssc> (A D F G <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#936;font> <font face="Greek Uncials">&#207;font> lat sy) read <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#7937;&#956;&#945;&#961;&#964;&#943;&#945;&#962;font> (<font face="Greektl">Jamartia&quot;font>, &#8220;of sin&#8221;) here, but several important <sc>msssc> (<font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1488;font> B 0278 6 81 1739 1881 <i>ali> co) read <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#7936;&#957;&#959;&#956;&#943;&#945;&#962;font> (<font face="Greektl">anomia&quot;font>, &#8220;of lawlessness&#8221;). Although external support for <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#7937;&#956;&#945;&#961;&#964;&#943;&#945;&#962;font> is broader, the generally earlier and better witnesses are on the side of <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#7936;&#957;&#959;&#956;&#943;&#945;&#962;font>. Internally, since <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#7937;&#956;&#945;&#961;&#964;&#943;&#945;font> (<font face="Greektl">Jamartiafont>, &#8220;sin&#8221;) occurs nearly ten times as often as <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#7936;&#957;&#959;&#956;&#943;&#945;font> (<font face="Greektl">anomiafont>, &#8220;lawlessness&#8221;) in the <i>corpus Paulinumi>, scribes would be expected to change the text to the more familiar term. At the same time, the mention of <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#7936;&#957;&#959;&#956;&#943;&#945;font> in v. 7 and <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#8001; &#7940;&#957;&#959;&#956;&#959;&#962;font> (<font face="Greektl">Jo anomo&quot;font>, &#8220;the lawless one&#8221;) in v. 8, both of which look back to v. 3, may have prompted scribes to change the text toward <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#7936;&#957;&#959;&#956;&#943;&#945;&#962;font>. The internal evidence is thus fairly evenly balanced. Although a decision is difficult, <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#7936;&#957;&#959;&#956;&#943;&#945;&#962;font> has slightly greater probability of authenticity than <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#7937;&#956;&#945;&#961;&#964;&#943;&#945;&#962;font>.

(0.12)(Isa 1:27)

tc The Hebrew text has, &#8220;her repentant ones/returnees with righteousness.&#8221; The form <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1513;&#1473;&#1464;&#1489;&#1462;&#1497;&#1492;&#1464;font> (<font face="Scholar">shavehafont>, &#8220;her repentant ones&#8221;), as pointed in MT, is a masculine plural Qal participle from <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1513;&#1473;&#1493;&#1468;&#1489;font> (<font face="Scholar">shuvfont>, &#8220;return&#8221;). Used substantivally, it refers to the &#8220;returning (i.e., repentant) ones.&#8221; It is possible that the parallel line (with its allusion to being freed by a ransom payment) suggests that the form be repointed to <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1513;&#1473;&#1460;&#1489;&#1456;&#1497;&#1464;&#1492;&#1468;font> (<font face="Scholar">shivyahfont>, &#8220;her captivity&#8221;), a reading that has support from the LXX. Some slightly emend the form to read <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1493;&#1456;&#1513;&#1473;&#1464;&#1489;&#1464;&#1492;font> (<font face="Scholar">v&#255;shavahfont>, &#8220;and will return&#8221;). According to this view, the verb from the first line applies to the second line as well with the following translation as a result: &#8220;she will be released when fairness is restored.&#8221; Regardless, it makes best sense in the context to regard this as a reference to repentant Israelites returning to the land of promise. This understanding provides a better contrast with the rebels and sinners in 1:28.

(0.12)(Jer 6:2)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;The beautiful and delicate one I will destroy, the daughter of Zion. The English versions and commentaries are divided over the rendering of this verse because (1) there are two verbs with these same consonants, one meaning &#8220;to be like&#8221; and the other meaning &#8220;to be destroyed&#8221; (intransitive) or &#8220;to destroy&#8221; (transitive), and (2) the word rendered &#8220;beautiful&#8221; (<font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1504;&#1464;&#1493;&#1464;&#1492;font>, <font face="Scholar">navahfont>) can be understood as a noun meaning &#8220;pasture&#8221; or as a defective writing of an adjective meaning &#8220;beautiful, comely&#8221; (<font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1504;&#1464;&#1488;&#1493;&#1464;&#1492;font>, <font face="Scholar">nafont>&#8217;<font face="Scholar">vahfont>). Hence some render &#8220;Fair Zion, you are like a lovely pasture,&#8221; reading the verb form as an example of the old second feminine singular perfect. Although this may fit the imagery of the next verse, that rendering ignores the absence of a preposition (<font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1500;&#1456;font> or <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1488;&#1462;&#1500;font>, <font face="Scholar">l&#255;font> or &#8217;<font face="Scholar">elfont>, both of which can be translated &#8220;to&#8221;) that normally goes with the verb &#8220;be like&#8221; and drops the conjunction in front of the adjective &#8220;delicate.&#8221; The parallel usage of the verb in Hos 4:5 argues for the meaning &#8220;destroy.&#8221;

(0.12)(Jer 9:24)

tn Or &#8220;fairness and justice, because these things give me pleasure.&#8221; Verse 24 reads in Hebrew, &#8220;But let the one who brags brag in this: understanding and knowing me that I, the <sc>Lordsc>, do faithfulness, justice, and righteousness in the earth for/that I delight in these.&#8221; It is uncertain whether the Hebrew particle <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1499;&#1468;&#1460;&#1497;font> (<font face="Scholar">kifont>) before the clause &#8220;I delight in these things&#8221; is parallel to the <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1499;&#1468;&#1460;&#1497;font> introducing the clause &#8220;that I, the <sc>Lordsc>, act&#8230;&#8221; or causal giving the grounds for the <sc>Lordsc> acting the way he does. In the light of the contrasts in the passage and the emphasis that Jeremiah has placed on obedience to the covenant and ethical conduct in conjunction with real allegiance to the <sc>Lordsc> not mere lip service, it is probable that the clauses are parallel. For the use of <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1499;&#1468;&#1460;&#1497;font> to introduce clauses of further definition after a direct object as here see GKC 365 &#167;117.<i>hi> and see BDB 393 s.v. <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1497;&#1464;&#1491;&#1463;&#1506;font> Qal.1.a. For parallels to the idea of Yahweh requiring these characteristics in people see Hos 6:6, Mic 6:8.